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Are Screen Kisses Hot or Cold ? 
I I'hat Becomes of tiieirWeddinjRinJs? 
I \ The Crown Jewels of Hollywood 



25 CENTS 




MILE-STONES 



In the Love Affairs that Last a Lifetime 




Staying young with your husband — the priceless 
reward that comes from keeping "That School- 
girl Complexion." The simple rule to follow 



At Eighteen- — "That Schoolgirl 
Comblexion" 




SWEETHEARTS in the first fresh 
radiance of Youth . . . lovers sharing 
the experience of the years . . . comrades 
together in life's mellow afterglow . . . 

Staying young with her husband! A 
priceless faculty . . . yet no secret, to the 
millions who are doing it. To these 
fortunate ones Mile-stones in life come only as 
happy reminders of congenial miles together. 

The art of keeping young — of staying beautiful, 
today is simply the secret of keeping natural beauty. 

Women with lovely complexions know that 
common-sense care surpasses any synthetic beauty 
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Keeping the skin cleansed, the pores open, with 
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More and more every day, women turn to 

this safe way to beauty 

Wash your face gently with soothing Palmolive 

Soap, massaging its balmy lather softly into the 

skin. Rinse thoroughly, first with warm water, then 



At Fifty — Still "That 
Schoolgirl Complexion" 



At Thirty — Keeping 

"That Schoolgirl 

Complexion" 

Avoid this mistake 
Do not use ordinary soaps in the treat 
ment given above. Do not think any grte; 

soap, or one represented as of olive and pain 

oils, is the same as Palmolive. 

And it costs but 10c the cake! So little that mil 
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Soap from trees 

The only oils in Palmolive Soap are the sooth 

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the world's priceless beauty 

i j, , i , .-, secrets. The Palmolive -Peet 

Retail \ f\c " a ' mo '"' e S° a P " untouched by human hands until 
Price W) you break the wrapper— it is never sold unwrapped Company, Chicago, 111. 



with cold. If your skin is inclined to be dry, apply a - 
touch of good cold cream — that is all. Do this reg- 
ularly, and particularly in the evening. Use powder 
and rouge if you wish. But never leave them on over 
night. They clog the pores, often enlarge them. Black- 
heads and disfigurements often follow. They must be 
washed away. 




PALMOLIVE RADIO HOUR— Broadcast every Friday night— from 10 to 1 1 p. m., eastern time; 9 to 10 p. m , 
central time— over station WEAF and 29 stations associated with The National Broadcasting Company. 

KEEP THAT SCHOOLGIRL COMPLEXION 



*, 




/[ETRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER brings great news to you for the coming year. 






#JOHN GILBERT and 
mance,"The Carnival 
two other pictures and GRETA 
GARBO in three. "Show People" 
brings MARION DAVIES 
and happy WILLIAM 
HAINES together in a mar- 
velous special production. MAR- 
ON DAVIES has three additional 
pictures and WILLIAM HAINES has 
four. "The Loves of Casanova" is 
a surprise special from M-G-M. 
i. \ LOW CHANEY will be in 
^Hf "While the City 
Sleeps" and three other \ 
Hlms; RAMON NOVARRO 

'Gold Braid" and one more; 
NORMA SHEARER in 



GRETA GARBO will appear in a great ro* 
of Life", and JOHN GILBERT will be in 



in 





"GOOD NIGHT RADIO-WE 

NEVER MISS AN M-G-M PICTURE" 




And now see the wonderful array of 
photoplays which Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer will bring you during 1928*29. 

AT YOUR THEATER 
NEXT SEASON! 

(Be sure to ask your Theater "Manager to make arrangements now") 



Winners of the Ralph Forbes Memory Contest for May: Mrs. Berniece Jackson, 

214 West Elm St., Ludlow, Ky., and Mr. Milburn Carl Smith, 520 South Rose 

Ave., Kalamazoo, Mich. Autographed photographs have been sent to the next 

fifty prize winners. 





^l| DANE and ARTHUR'S 
additional fun films. 




"Ballyhoo" and three other productions, and LILLIAN GISH jf 
in "The Wind", ^jfik BUSTER KEATON appears in "The Camera \; 
Man" and in another comedy, 

plans include "Camping Out" and three 

CODY and PRINGLE offer the Broadway hit, "The Baby Cyclone" and 

two more pictures* TIIVS £% IVIcCOY has six adventure pictures. 

That amazing dog, FLASH, has two thrillers. There will also be three 

COSMOPOLITAN PRODUCTIONS and three ELECTRIC LIGHT HITS with big, 

absorbing themes. Rounding out M-G-M's new offerings^are its famous HAL 

OACH comedies: those rascals, OUR GANG 5 1^^^^ the laugh artists 

a 1 AN LAUREL and OLIVER HARDY;^b JBL and rib-tickling 

CHARLEY CHASE and com ^S§\^j ical MAX DAVIDSON 

with HAL ROACH'S ALL- STARS. The M-G-M NEWS will again bring 

the world's happenings and, with M-G-M's GREAT EVENTS Series in TECHNICOL 

-M's famed ODDITIES, there's the best entertainment in the world in store foa 




T*j 






■ DWVN @ W4Y 





Wilder than any of the Arabian Nights are the tales that might "be told of some 
modern "Roadhouse" nights — and here is one of them you won't forget in a hurry ! 

Lured by a voluptuous siren who acts as the "come-on" for a gang of crooks operating 
a popular roadhouse as a shield for their real business, Larry Grayson runs the 
gamut of drink, passion and wild abandonment until he wakes up to find ^A 

himself on trial for murder! ^^p 

Here is a picture that will open your eyes — because what happened 
to Larry Grayson could happen to anyone! 

With Maria Alba, Warren Burke, Lionel Barrymore and ^A 

Julia Swayne Gordon in the leading roles, "Roadhouse" 
is one of the most powerfully enacted stories of 
modern youth ever filmed! 



W/iamJox 

presents 




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"NT 



Mr \j& 







with ^&m / 



Richard 
Rosson^ 

Production 





CI E7945', 




Volume XXXVI, No. 1 



August, 19. 



Features in This Issue 

Cover Portrait, Norma Shearer Marland Stone 

Are Screen Kisses Hot or Cold? . Helen Carlisle 28 

Do Film Lowers P t ut Their Heart — or Merely Their Art — Into Their Work? 

South Seasick Dorothy Calhoun 31 

// Monte Was Bine When He Went There, He Came Back a Vivid Indigo 

Art for Ark's Sake .* . Herbert Cruikshank 33 

Bigger and Better Orgies Mark the Spectacle Whose Expenses Know Noah Limit 

Souls in Plaster • Ann Cum ' '<?s 34 

William Mortenscn, the Mask-Master, Brought to the Movies His Art and Fay ll'ray 

The Crown Jewels of Hollywood Dorothy £ 

Willy and Gussie, of Copenhagen, Make — Overnight — Danish Pastry That Would Dazzle the Queen of 
Sheba 

Better Than He Expected Cedric . 

Walter Byron Left England Prepared for Jolly Well Anything, So Even Hollywodd Didn't Give Him 
Much of a Pain 

What Becomes of Their Wedding Rings? Dorothy Manners 44 

The Merry — and Otherwise — Widows of Hollywood Dispose of Them Variously 

Has Anybody Here Seen Connie ? Carl Lewis 49 

What Is the Last Name of the Extra Girl Whose Charm Outshines the Stars? 

* 

Act and Grow Young , Oscar Dunning 50 

Kathleen Clifford Docs — and She's as Fresh as the Dewiest Flowers in Any of Her Own Six Shops 

Brass Will Tell Elizabeth Petersen 52 

The Faster the Little Girls Work the Faster They Become Stars 

A Jack of One Trade. . Carolyn Dawson 55 

And After Fifteen Years of It the Buoyant Mr. Mulhall Likes Movie Acting Better Than Ever 

Too Nice to Love Gladys Hall 59 

Florence Vidor Lives in a Manless World and Says She Likes It 

She Knows Her Orchids Nancy Pryor 67 

Jane Winton Scored on a Triple Play: Philly to Follies to Films 

Fugitives from Fame Rilla Page Palmborg 68 

At Malibu Beach the Stars Entrench to Protect Their Privacy 

Bitter Bills to Swallow Gladys Hall 71 

Between Panhandlers and Fanners, James Hall Has Found Life in Hollywood Is No Story Book 

Paris : Cherbourg, 10:46 Lars Moen 72 

A Boat-Train Interview with Lili Damita, Samuel Goldzvyn's Newest Gift to American Fans 

•uickshank, Art Director Dorothy Donnell Calhoun, Western Edi 

Motion Picture Magazine is published monthly by Motion Picture Publications, Inc., at 18410 Jamaica 
Avenue, Jamaica, New York. Executive Offices, Paramount Building, 1501 Broadway, New York City. 
European agents, Atlas Publishing Company, 18, Bride Lane, London, E. C. 4. Entered as second- 
class matter at Post Office at Jamaica N. Y ., under Act of March 3rd, 1879. George Kent Shuler, 
Pres. and Treas.; Duncan A. Dobie, Jr., Vice Pres. ; Murray C. Bernays, Sec'y. Subscriptions for 
U. S., Cuba, Mexico and Philippines, $2.50 a year in advance. Canada, $3.00. Foreign countries, $3.50 



ries 

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Fifteen-Dollar Letter 
Think No Evil— See No Evil 

FORDSON, MICH.— Why do the critics 
(or fans rather) find so much fault 
with our sex appeal plays ? 

They are presented to the public true to 
life in most cases and an air of under- 
standing mingled with affection is always 
felt during love scenes, among the audi- 
ence. I have witnessed many times an arm 
steal across a shoulder, a gentle squeeze, a 
knowing look — maybe a sweetheart, maybe 
a wife — still those tender gestures some- 
times mean more than we realize. 

No ! Indeed they are not demoralizing. 
They are just what one makes them. 

If we think clean, so will we see. . Let 
the players use their own discretion. Let 
the fans use their better judgment, see 
things in the light for which they are in- 
tended. A movie is not much different 
from a story — without a little love per- 
meating the scenes, it will leave us feeling 
blue and very much dissatisfied. 

In last month's issue of a fan magazine, 
some girl said "she was tired of happy 
endings." Isn't that terrible? She must 
have a muchly warped view of life. It's 
really pitiful; such a heart must surely be 
heavy and sad. 

I am thankful that I am one of the out- 
standing majority that prefers the in- 
evitable happy ending — regardless. 

On with the show, let love be uncon- 
fined. Barbara Henderson. 



wheat up here in the Northwest, some- 
times we can't sell them, not because the 
world ever had too much of them, but 
simply because the world has not yet found 
the way. 

The shadow people of the screen are 
truly international. I regret so many 
change their names. I should like to see 
them retain something of their own na- 
tionality, or that of their parents, in the 
screen names under which they act. \\ hy 
should any .one particular race or nation 
get most of the credit among the mass of 
the people (who seldom go below names), 
when the sons and daughters of so many 
races and nations are all contributing to 
the glory of the movies? 

Theodora Smith. 



Ten-Dollar Letter 
All for Glory of the Movies 
SPOKANE, WASH.— I love the people 
of the screen. I 
love their bright, 
eyes and smiling 
faces. I regret 
that there 
should be such 
a keen struggle 
for a living 
among them, 
when it seems 
to me all the 
capable ones 
could be used to 
entertain us. I 
bate to think of 
the many good 
ones that must 
fail while the 
few survive. 
Too many peo- 
p 1 e in the 
movies? No, not 
for the amount 
" of entertainment 
that the world 
needs. It's like 
our apples and 



Prizes for Best Letters 

Each month Motion Picture Maga- 
zine will award cash prizes for the three 
best letters published. Fifteen dollars 
will be paid for the best letter, ten dol- 
lars for the second best, and five dollars 
for the third. If more than one letter is 
considered of equal merit, the full 
amount of the prize will go to each 
writer. 

So, if you've been entertaining any 
ideas about the movies and the stars, con- 
fine yourself to about 200 words or less, 
and let's know what's on your mind. 
Anonymous communications will not be 
considered and no letters will be re- 
turned. Sign your full name and ad- 
dress. We will use only initials if re- 
quested. Address: Letters to the Editor, 
Motion Picture Magazine, Paramount 
Building, 1501 Broadway, New York City. 



Five-Dollar Letter 

Youth Predominates 

AKRON, OHIO.— Emil Jannings is a 
great character actor, but, given the same 
opportunities as well as the same excellence 
in the choice of screen material, and George 
Bancroft would transplant that concession 
with a competition too potential for the 
good of the glamor that is at present at- 
tached to the adroit Teuton. 

John Barrymore, Ronald Colman, etc., 
names as common as the clatter of culinary 
wares, but I am sure that Charles Farrell 
has a remarkable personality that greatly 
overshadows that of "these (with the 
emphasis on the these) great actors" — and 
I don't mean maybe. 

Clara Bow, Billie Dove, Colleen Moore 
— all "old-timers" who still whirl with the 
divine gaiety of youth; but, alas. Time 

undermines the 
false sincerity 
of favoritism, 
for there is 
Janet Gaynor . . . 
there is Dolores 
del Rio . . . there 
i s . . . a h , and 
Time even 
chuckles grimly 
at these expres- 
sions of favorit- 
ism, for they are 
as insincere and 
fickle as New- 
Year 's resolu- 
tions. 

You 
domi- 
thesf 
wel 
re 
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A MONTHLY MAGAZINE 

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MOTHERS AND CHILDREN 



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Letters to the Editor 

(Continued from page 6) 



the wayside," the quicker do we induce 
progress to gallop to the chosen heights, 
unchecked. John Poda. 



Pity the Poor Players 

BLACKPOOL, ENGLAND— The pub- 
lic is too ready to overlook the hardships 
and exactions of movie acting. While 
admitting the pains and penalties of ap- 
prenticeship, we picture stars as floating 
languidly through an atmosphere of 
speechless admiration and muddled matri- 
mony. We envy their (alleged) salaries 
and covet their possessions. Publicity 
matter has caused many fans to break the 
Tenth Commandment. We firmly believe 
that star; lead lives of unbridled license, 
extravagant luxury and self-indulgence. 
They sup on nectar and ambrosia with fre- 
quent recourse to the hip-flask. One of 
several dozen cars takes the actor to work 
(if he feels like it), otherwise, he stays 
in bed all day with a leopard-skin counter- 
pane, sipping absinthe and reading smutty 
novels. 

Seriously, though, can anyone suppose 
that stars are permitted to play fast and 
loose with their health and morals, not to 
speak of reputations ? Of the minor players 
I say nothing, but the "brave men and 
fair women" of the movies must preserve 
their strength and beauty. 

I have recently seen players of first rank 
submit to being thrown from horses, 
dragged by a rope or a limb, plunged into 
water fully clothed, smothered in mud, 
kicked, shaken and slapped. 

Easy money? Not much! 

Barbara Fletcher. 



Only One Valentino 

MANILA, PHILIPPINE IS.— I would 
like to express my regret that so many 
people overuse and abuse the name of the 
late Rudolph Valentino. If a person hap- 
pens to have his hair exceedingly well- 
combed, he is called a Valentino ; if he 
happens to have some sort of romantic 
disposition, he is a Valentino ; if he can 
register certain expressions with the eyes, 
awkward and ungainly though they may 
be, he is hailed as a Valentino ; and to cap 
the climax, if an individual, who looks 
more like an ogre than a human being, 
happens to be in sight, for the sake of a 
laugh and of being called funny, someone, 
who thinks himself witty, dubs him a 
Valentino. In my opinion, this is wrong, 
because, since our gallant Rudolph is now 
dead, his memory should be held in respect 
and his name, instead of being used so 
foolishly and nonsensically, should be re- 
spected and revered. G. B. Z. 



No Occasion for Mud-Slinging 

OCEAN BEACH, CALIF.— I some- 
times wonder if the person who throws 
a brickbat ever heard the saying that, "It 
is the differences in opinion that have made 
the world what it is today." This may be 
applied to the motion picture world as 
well. If we all liked the same kind of 
candy, what would be the use of making 
a different kind. The same with stars and 
pictures. 

Not to cast any reflections on this star's 
wonderful career, by any means, but just 
as an illustration. If we all made a tin 
god of Mary Pick ford and would not think 
of going to see any picture other than one 
in which she played, what would be the 
use of having any other stars at all ? 

So you see it's our differences in opinion 



that lead some to like one star and others 
to like another. But that is not an oc- 
casion for "mud-slinging." There's always 
a little bit of good in a thing, no matter 
how bad the thing may be. 

Margaret Allen. 



Life Monotonous Without Movie? 

MELROSE, MASS.— I sometimes won 
der what would be the effect upon people 
if movies were suddenly entirely prohib- 
ited. It seems to me the everyday routine 
would be decidedly monotonous, while the 
number of amusements would be few and 
far between. 

The wonder of being transposed to the 
inspiring "Ben-Hur" period, or of follow- 
ing the strange actions of the French For- 
eign Legion in "Beau Geste," or even of 
wistfully yearning to be in "Seventh 
Heaven," is what endears the movies and 
the stars to me. 

To Griffith, DeMille, Ingram, Lasky, and 
hosts of other great directors, we fans 
owe our gratitude for the wonders of 
movieland which they have portrayed. 
While to Pickford, Del Rio, Gilbert, No- 
varro, and the thousands of other earnest 
stars, goes the glory of the splendid act- 
ing. 

So here's my three cheers for the movies 
■ — and the best of good wishes and success 
to the stars and directors. 

Ruth Anna Jcpson. 



Movies Are a Blessing 

BROOKLYN, N. Y.— So much has been 
said for and against the "movies" that to 
express oneself, in either way, seems trite. 
There are two factors of importance to be 
listed by every true patriot of the films. 

One is, that they are a blessing, sent to 
cheer the lonely at heart. The other is, 
that they broaden the mind, give one an 
interest outside of himself, and set the 
mind in motion. That is — pictures like 
"The Last Laugh" and "Wings." 

And there is one, and only one factor, to 
be expressed definitely concerning the be- 
low par picture of today. It seems to me 
that America is "growing up" to the reali- 
zation that we need clean, fine films, that 
are not made for half-wits and unlettered 
people. That we should see truth above 
all things, and yet have the beauty of well- 
acted stories. Why not cater to the edu- 
cated millions, who will condemn quickly 
and severely those pictures which are be- 
low notice in plot and acting? 

The next World War may be with fire 
and guns, but the next revolution will be 
the rebellion of the advanced picture-goers, 
who want wholesome fun not unmixed 
with sophistication. Then will we arise, 
and acclaim the great nation of the Motion 
Picture — America! Virginia Crowcll. 



For Sue and Nick 

DALLAS, TEXAS— There is only one 
actress whom I consider perfect in every 
respect. The girl is Sue Carol, an actress- 
who is so charming that adjectives can not 
even describe her. The best description 
that I can make of Sue is to say that she 
possesses the vivacity, individuality and sex 
appeal of Clara Bow plus the beauty, 
charm and sophistication that Clara lacks. 
I do not wish to talk against Clara Bow, 
as she is one of my favorite actresses, but 
I do wish to state that Sue Carol is the 
most perfect all-around actress on the 
screen and this seems to be the best de- 
(Continued on page 10) 



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A Thrill You Never Expected ! 

Mack Sen nett's 

^^■"V Jkrsonallu Directed Jull-Jknqth Jeature f ^ 

Will be at Your Theatre Soon a 



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Tlafe //ze z^orJ 0/ fAe raaw jwAo discovered — 

CHARLIE CHAPLIN* GLORIA SW ANSON * 
CHARLIE MURRA Y+ WALLACE BEERY* PHYLLIS 
HAVER* MARIE PREVOST* LOUISE EAZENDA + 

MABEL NORM AND • 
— you'll see 3 New Star Finds in "The Good-bye Kiss" — 
JOHNN Y BURKE • SALLY EILERS * MA TTY KEMP 

A liYAt Rational Picture 

yv/Iakes the Guesswork Out of "Going to the Movies" 




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"Can he really play?" a girl whispered. "Heavens, no!" 
Arthur exclaimed. "He never played a note in his life." 



, /innur exaaimea. tie never piayca a note in ms nje. ^s*. ^l % r wil'-iFT^ i (J l[l ' 'PJ M v^-\\TillDn»f ff;fli> ■ 

rhey Laughed When I Sat Down 

At the Piano 
But When I Started to Play! 



ARTHUR had just played 'The Rosary. 

l\ The room rang with applause. I de- 

I cided that this would be a dramatic 

'rnent for me to make my debut. To the 

azement of all my friends I strode con- 

ntly over to the piano and sat down. 

Jack is up to his old tricks," somebody 

Hickled. The crowd laughed. They were 

jjcertain that I couldn't play a single note. 

('■Can he really play?" I heard a girl 

lisper to Arthur. "Heavens, no!" Arthur 

claimed. "He never played a note in all 

,J life. . . But just you watch him. This is 

ibing to be good." 

I I decided to make the most of the situa- 
lon. With mock dignity I drew out a silk 
andkerchief and lightly dusted off the 
ceys. Then I rose and gave the revolv- 
ng piano stool a quarter of a turn, just 
as I had seen an imitator of Paderewski do 
in a vaudeville sketch. 

"What do you think of his execution?" 
called a voice from the rear. 

" We're in favor of it!" came back the an- 
swer, and the crowd rocked with laughter. 

Then I Started to Play 

Instantly a tense silence fell on the guests. 
The laughter'died on their lips as if by magic. 
I played through the first bars of Liszt's 
immortal Liebestraume. I heard gasps of 
amazement. My friends sat breathless — 
spellbound. 

I played on and as I played I forgot the 
people around me. I forgot the hour, the 
place, the breathless listeners. The little 
world I lived in seemed to fade — seemed to 
grow dim — unreal. Only the 
music was real. Only the 
music and the visions it 
brought me. Visions as 
beautiful and as changing 
as the wind-blown clouds 
and drifting moonlight, that 
long ago inspired the master 
composer. It seemed as if 

e master musician himself 

T. ere speaking to me — ■ 

■ )eaking through the me- 

| s , urn of music — not in 

' e fords but in chords. Not 

1 sentences but in ex- 



fl s ' 
,' lisite melodies. 

/A Complete Triumph! 

J As the last notes of the 



Pick 


Your 


Instrument 


Piano 


Harmony and 


Organ 


Composition 


Violin 


Sight Singing 


Drums and 


Ukulele 


Traps 


Guitar 


Mandolin 


Hawaiian 


Clarinet 


Steel Guitar 


Flute 


Harp 


Saxophone 


Cornet 


'Cello 


Piccolo 




Trombone 


Voice and 


Speech Culture 


Automatic 


Finger Control 


Banjo (Plectrum, 5-String or 


Tenor) 



Liebestraume died away, the room re- 
sounded with a sudden roar of applause. I 
found myself surrounded by excited faces. 
How my friends carried on ! Men shook my 
hand — wildly congratulated me — pounded 
me on the back in their enthusiasm! Every- 
body was exclaiming with delight — plying 
me with rapid questions. . . . "Jack! Why 
didn't you tell us you could play like that?" 

"Where did you learn? " — "How long have 
you studied?" — "Who was your teacher?" 

"I have never even seen my teacher," I 
replied. "And just a short while ago I 
couldn't play a note." 

"Quit your kidding," laughed Arthur, 
himself an accomplished pianist. "You've 
been studying for years, I can tell." 

" I have been studying only a short 
while," I insisted. " I decided to keep it a 
secret so that I could surprise all you folks." 

Then I told them the whole story. 

" Have you ever heard of the U. S. School 
of Music?" I asked. A few of my friends 
nodded. "That's a correspondence school, 
isn't it?" they exclaimed. 

"Exactly," I replied. "They have a new 
simplified method that can teach you to play 
any instrument by note in just a few 
months." 



How I Learned to Play Without 
a Teacher 

And then I explained how for years I had 
longed to play the piano. 

"It seems just a short while ago," I con- 
tinued, "that I saw an interesting ad of the 
U. S. School of Music men- 
tioning a new method of 
learning to play which only 
cost a few cents a day ! The 
ad told how a woman had 
mastered the piano in her 
spare time at home — and 
without a teacher! Best of all, 
the wonderful new method 
she used required no labo- 
rious scales — no heartless 
exercises — no tiresome prac- 
tising. It sounded so con- 
vincing that I filled out the 
coupon requesting the Free 
Demonstration Lesson. 

"The free book arrived 
promptly and I started in 
that very night to study the 



Demonstration Lesson. I was amazed to 
see how easy it was to play this new way. 
Then I sent for the course. 

"When the course arrived I found it was 
just as the ad said — as easy as A. B. C. ! And 
as the lessons continued they got easier and 
easier. Before I knew it I was playing all 
the pieces I liked best. I soon will be able to 
play ballads or classical numbers of jazz, all 
with equal ease. And I never did have any 
special talent for music." 

Play Any Instrument 

You, too, can now teach yourself to be an accom- 
plished musician — right at home — in half the usual 
time. You can't go wrong with this simple new 
method which has already shown almost half a 
million people how to play their favorite instru- 
ments by note. Forget that old-fashioned idea that 
you need special "talent." Just read the list of instru- 
ments in the panel, decide which one you want to 
play and the U. S. School will' do the rest. And 
bear in mind no matter which instrument you 
choose, the cost in each case will be the same — 
just a few cents a day. No matter whether you are 
a mere beginner or already a good performer, you 
will be interested in learning about this new and 
wonderful method. 

Send for Our Free Booklet and 
Demonstration Lesson 

Thousands of successful students never dreamed 
they possessed musical ability until it was revealed 
to them by a remarkable "Musical Ability Test" 
which we send entirely without cost with our inter- 
esting free booklet. 

If you are in earnest about wanting to play your 
favorite instrument — if you really want to gain hap- 
piness and increase your popularity — send at once 
for the free booklet and Demonstration Lesson. 
No cost — no obligation. Sign and send the con- 
venient coupon now. Instruments supplied when 
needed, cash or credit. U. S. School of Music, 
605 Brunswick Bldg., New York City. 



U. S. School of Music, 

605 Brunswick Bldg., New York City. 

Please send me your free book "Music Lessons In 
Your Own Home," with introduction by Dr. Frank 
Crane, Demonstration Lesson and particulars of 
your offer. I am interested in the following course: 



Have you above instrument 



Name. 



(Please write plainly) 



Address 



City. 



. State 



TED! 







whichYOV 
can write / 

How many times have you felt the 
urge to write a story for the screen 
only to despair in the realization that 
you were at a loss as how to proceed 
in putting your ideas into acceptable 
motion picture form? Many ideas — 
ideas that are -worth real money — 
never- get beyond the idea stage — are 
forgotten — all because you do not 
know how to go about it. Right now 
you may have an idea for a screen 
story which would put you on easy 
street, if only you could plan it 
properly and so gain the attention of 
a moving picture producer. 

Demand Greater 
Than Supply 

Hollywood is literally hungry for ideas. Screen 
stories arc in tremendous demand and there 
is no limit to what the producer will pay. 
And the most startling thing of all is that many 
of the biggest box office attractions in recent 
years were produced from ideas suggested by 
men and women — young and old — from all walks 
of life — who had absolutely no previous morion, 
picture experience! This should convince you that 
you, too, can succeed in this fascinating, highly 
profitable, field. 

Determine to Act — Now 

The Hollywood Academy, under the personal 
direction of a scenario writer of long experience 
and attainments, teaches motion picture play- 
writing from the ground up — in a practical way 
which you can easily understand — giving you 
instruction -based entirely on fact, imparting 
knowledge which would ordinarily require 
years of actual studio experience to acquirel 
In your home, in your favorite easy chair, you 
can now equip yourself for success in scenario 
writing or for one of eleven other delightful 
big-salaried positions in the motion picture field. 

Get the Facts — Today! 

Mail coupon now for illustrated book "The Key 
to Hollywood," giving complete information 
and money back guaratec offer. Small convenient 
payments — no contract to sign — plus the satisfaction 
of knowing that you are one of a family of students 
receiving the personal and individual instruction 
of the educational director of Hollywood Acad- 
emy. Mail coupon now 

THE HOLLYWOOD 
ACADEMY 

Educational Offices, Hollywood, Calif. 

Executive Offices, 55 West 42nd St. 

N. Y. C. 

A pproved as a correspondence school under 
the laws of the State of New York 



THE HOLLYWOOD ACADEMY 

55 West 42nd St., New York, Dept. H. 3 

Please send your book "The Key to Hollywood.' 



Letters to the Editor 

{Continued from page 8) 



Address . 



f'Qhe'Key toWollywoodl^ 



10 



scription that I can make of her. Nick 
Stuart, my favorite actor, seems to me a 
synonym for the word "youth," and I 
should sincerely like to see him play in a 
picture with Sue Carol. 

Packard Sherrcll. 



Directors, Attention! 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.— War pic- 
tures are still with us, so I'd like to ask 
the directors of this type of picture to use 
a little discretion in their war-scenes. 
Many of these pictures lack a proper sense 
of proportion. This is true mostly of the 
epic and super-pictures. 

Scenes of actual warfare are necessary, 
but are often allowed to continue endlessly, 
much to the boredom of the audience. The 
plot of the picture, and the leading char- 
acters, are far more important than the 
most artistically photographed war-scenes, 
so when these scenes are allowed to sub- 
merge the plot, and the leading characters, 
— then the director should call a halt. 
We've had so many war pictures already, 
that scenes of warfare are nothing unusual, 
and only the most cleverly done scenes will 
hold the interest of the fans in the future. 
Will the directors take the hint? 

Rose Palonskv. 



Movies Showing Great 
Improvement 

VANCOUVER, B. C— It is with much 
satisfaction that we notice a great improve- 
ment in the motion picture production of 
to-day. After the war they were with very 
few exceptions devoid of decency and 
morality. In their mad rush to make 
money, the producer forgot for awhile 
that they, like the novelist, have a mission 
to the public. The impressionable minds 
of the younger generation were filled with 
ideas of the marriage state and home life. 
They failed to remember that they were 
holding a mirror of false ideals and impure 
code of morals to minds eager to absorb. 

Fortunately there is now a reaction and 
the Movie is steadily improving. We have 
suitable music in most of the theaters and 
as an educational agency it has few rivals. 
Let us hope that the producers will at last 
realize that they have a duty to the public, 
a duty not onlv to entertain but to educate 
and elevate. E. R. M. (A Well-Wisher) 



Their Private Affairs 

BLACKPOOL, LANCS., ENG.— A lot 
has already been said and written about 
these "Hollywood Romances," and here is 
my contribution to this much discussed 
subject. I know there are happy families 
in the film city . . . but I don't think 
film actors should marry unless the woman 
gives up her work. 

Somehow, I get such a sinking feeling 
when I read of a star's "private affairs" 
(which are always so public). Most of 
us like to think of our favorites as "nice 
people," but it puts the tin lid on every- 
thing when one reads of all these divorce- 
court proceedings. It is not that I don't 
agree with divorce . . . I do . . . but dash 
it all ! they are getting fresh wives and 
husbands every minute. 

I say with a deep sigh, "If only we were 
kept in the dark a little more." 

Forgive me if I appear a little vague, but 
you tell me to confine myself to two hun- 
dred words, and that is a hard thing to 
ask any woman to do. 

Winifride Butterivorth. 



Nothing But Praise to Offer 

CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAN 
— I have nothing but praise to offer sor 
of the stars for the progress they hai 
made. A few years ago Marion Davi 
was lifeless and mechanical. Today she ' | 
one of our most lively and amusing come 1 
diennes. Madge Bellamy, too, has emerge 
triumphant from "poke bonnet roles" tc' 
the screen's best exponent of the modern 
girl. 

I congratulate such old favorites I 
Blanche Sweet and Francis X. Bushma 
on their successful returns. After seeii< 
Mr. Bushman's performance in "The 13tj 
Juror" I am convinced that he is still tl] 
screen's finest actor. /. E. ' 



To Buddy's Rescue 

MONTGOMERY, ALA.— I just re? 
something in the June Motion Pictu- 
Macazine that made me "red hot." Tl 
very idea of saying Buddy Rogers hasr 
the technique. We don't want old m.j 
playing love scenes with Clara Bow. BJ 
sides, we have to begin young boys in t', 
movies or what would we do if all t/ 
older men retired or died. There must ] 
someone to take their places. Whoevj 
heard of the fact that Buddy Rogers is/ 
liked or people don't care for him? I thi 
Mrs. C. C. is just away off. 

A Buddy Rogers admirer, M. Welch) 



Herbert Brennon, Ideal Direct< 

SEATTLE, WASH.— Consider this- 
arri not a fan. I am a self-confessed mo- 1 
student. Wait, now — don't misundersU: 
That doesn't mean "critic." (Perish t\\ 
thought.) It's only that, from constant 
servance, I've engendered a certain profi^ 
ciency which helps me distinguish sincen] 
acting from hokum, spontaneity from imi 
tation, good from bad direction. 

Directing is a peculiar art. Surprising 
when you realize that a director must pos- 
sess the aggregate knowledge of his actors 
and his crew, as well as of their work. He 
needs vision, imagination, subtlety, a sense 
of balance, rhythm, color, tempo and hu- 
mor. A movie is as great as its director — 
no greater. 

When I was a freshman in high school, 
I had an ideal — an actor — Wallace Reid. 
Now, a senior in college, I still have an 
ideal — a director — Herbert Brennon. Mr. 
Brennon has more finesse than any other 
man in his line whose work I have seen ; 
more wisdom, more sense of the fitness of 
things. He is credited with unfailing suc- 
cesses. He knows people — he knows Life. 
He is rising toward true greatness. I rec- 
ommend him to the future as the director 
of the 

"GREAT AMERICAN FILM." 
Sincerely, 

A. M. 



Thank You! We Strive to Please 

CONSHOHOCKEN, PA.=-Qse-o4~%i.. 

finest words in the English language or 
any language, is the word "service." 
it is embodied all those qualities that J 
far toward drawing people closer in bon f 
of friendliness and understanding. Clo! 
observation of your magazine has maj 
me come to the pleasing conclusion tlf 
it is built on the foundation stone C 
Service. \ 

M. C. McCaU.t 









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-*- ^ — including personalities of prominent college men and 
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J ^ short stories — famous Andy Protheroe stories by the 
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<-xjx> 



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11 



CLASSIC 



is the de luxe publi- 
cation of the screen. 
It prides itself on its 
bright and attractive 
features — features 
which are off the 
beaten track. It is 
ever in search of 
new, original and 
fresh ideas. It be- 
lieves in giving you 
the up-to-date slant 
on what's going o^in 
the picture world. 
It's far ahead of the 
field, because it 
scores one journalis- 
tic beat after an- 
other. Its contribu- 
tors are constantly 
writing new impres- 
sions. 

'Buy the - 

CLASSIC 

for AUGUST 

ORDER YOUR 
COPY NOW 

The ^Magazine with the 
Personality 




By MARION MARTONE 



' 



Adoree, Renee — playing in Tide of Empire — Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Arlen, Richard — playing in .Bfggars of Life — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Armstrong, Robert — playing in Celebrity — Pathe- 
De Mille Studio, Culver City, Cal. 

Arthur, George K. — playing in Brotherly Love — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Astor, Mary — playing in Heart to Heart — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Asther, Nils — playing in Her Cardboard Lover — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



T>ancroft, George — playing in Docks of New York 
-"-* — Paramount Studios, S451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Banks, Monty — recently completed Flying Luck — 
Metropolitan Studios, 1040 Las Palmas Ave., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Banky, Vilma — playing in The Awakening — Sam- 
uel Goldwyn Productions — De Mille Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. 

Barrymore, John — playing in Tempest — United 
Artists Studios, 1041 N. Formosa Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Barrymore, Lionel — playing in Road House — Fox 
Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Barthelmess, Richard — playing in Out of the 
Ruins — First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Basquette, Lina — plaving in Celebrity — Pathe-De 
Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Baxter, Warner — plaving in Craig's Wife — Pathe- 
De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Beery, Noah — playing in Noah's Ark — Warner 
Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

Beery, Wallace — playing in Beggars of Life — Par- 
amount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Bellamy, Madge — playing in Mother Knows Best 
— Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Boles, John — recently completed Give and Take — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Borden, Olive — playing in Gang War- — FBO 
Studios, 780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Bosworth, Hobart — playing in The Sawdust 
Paradise — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal 

Bow, Clara — playing in Ladies of the Mob — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Bowers, John — recently completed Soft Living — 
Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Boyd, William — playing in Power — Pathe-De 
Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Brent, Evelyn — playing in The Letter — Paramount 
Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Brian, Mary — playing in The Perfumed Trap — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Bronson, Betty — playing in The Bellamy Trial — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Brook, Clive — playing in The Perfumed Trap — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Brooks, Louise — playing in Beggars of Life — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Brown, Johnny Mack — recently completed Our 
Dancing Daughters — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, 
Culver City, Cal. 

Burns, Edmund — playing in Phyllis of the Follies 
— Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 



/^arol, Sue — playing in The Air Circus — Fox 
^ Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Carr, Mary — playing in Love Over Night — Pathe- 
DeMille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Chandler, Lane — playing in The First Kiss — Par- 
amount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Chaney, Lon — playing in While the Cilv Sleeps — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Chaplin, Charles — recently completed The Circus 
— Charles Chaplin Studios, 1420 La Brea Ave., Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Cody, Lew — playing in Baby Cyclone — Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



Collier, Jr., William — playing in Tide of Empire— 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Collyer, June — playing in Me, Gangster — Fox Stu 
dios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Colman, Ronald — recently completed Two Lovers- 
Samuel Goldwyn Productions, De Mille Studios 
Culver City, Cal. 

Compson, Betty — playing in The Barker — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Conklin, Chester — playing in Taxi 13 — FBO Stu- 
dios, 780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Cooper, Gary — playing in The First Kiss — Para 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Costello, Dolores — playing in Noah's Ark — War 
ner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal 

Costello, Helene — playing in The Midnight Taxi — 
Warner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 
Cal. 

Crawford, Joan — playing in Four Walls-— Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



Dana, Viola — plaving in Lure of (he Nivht Club — 
FBO Studios, 780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Dane, Karl — playing in Brotherly Love — Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Daniels, Bebe — playing in Hot News — Paramount 
Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Davies, Marion — playing in Her Cardboard Love 
— Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Day, Alice — playing in Phyllis of the Follies — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Day, Marceline — playing in Brotherly Love — Metro 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Del Rio, Dolores — playing in Revenge — United Ar- 
tists Studios, 1041 No. Formosa Ave., Hollywood, Cal 

Delaney, Charles — playing in After the Storm — 
Columbia Picture Corp., 1408 Gower St., Hollywood 
Cal. 

Denny, Reginald — playing in His Lucky Day — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Dix, Richard — playing in Warming Up — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal 

Dove, Billy — playing in The Night Watch — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Dunn, Josephine — playing in Excess Baggage 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Duryea, George — playing in Tide of Empire 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City. Cai. 



p^airbanks, Douglas — recently completed TheGau 
" cho — Pickford-Fairbanks Studios, Hollywood, Cal 

Farrell, Charles — playing in Backwash— Fox. Stu 
dios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Fawcett, George — playing in Tide of Empire — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios. Culver City, Cal_. 

Fazenda, Louise — playing in Noah's Ark — War- 
ner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Fields, W. C. — recently completed Fools For Luck 
— Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly 
wood, Cal. 

Foxe, Earle — playing in None But the Brave — Fox 
Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 



Gaynor, Janet — recently completed The 4 Devils 
Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Garbo, Greta — playing in War In the Dark — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Maver Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Gibson, Hoot — playing in Riding for Fame 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Gilbert, John— playing in Four Walls— Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Grant, Lawrence — playing in The Woman from 
Moscow — Paramount Studios, 545 1 Marathon St 
Hollywood, Cal. .. 

Gray, Lawrence — playing in Oh Kay'.— First Na- 
tional Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Griffith, Corinne — playing in The Divine Lady- 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

(Continued on page 14) 



12 



Graw^fes grow^Eyelashes m& 
Eyebrows like this in 30 days 



By Lucille Young 

America's most nvidely 
known Beauty Expert for 
fifteen years. Beauty Ad- 
viser to over a million 
women. 

The most marvelous discovery has 
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I know that women will be wild to 
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want them to — at my risk. Doubt 
all you want to. It does seem im- 
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tofore has failed. But my search of 
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So now I say to women that no 
matter how scant the eyelashes and 
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accept a single penny. There are no 
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No "ifs," "ands," or "maybes!" New 
growth or no pay. And you are the 
sole judge. 

'Proved Beyond the Shadow 
of a Doubt 




G N]pw Eyelashes and Eyebrows can be made to grow. 
My new discovery MUST accomplish this, or its cost 
'will be refunded in full. Over 10,000 women have 
made the test. I have the most marvelous testimonials. 
Read a few here. I have attested before a notary pub- 
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Not just a few, but over ten thou- 
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it before this, my very first adver- 
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I print a few of them on this page. 
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note the first testimonial — an amaz- 
ing statement that my discovery , 
•^rtnallv nrndnreH hair on the fore- In one week — sometimes in a day or Possess beautiful eyelashes and eyebrows 
actually produced nair on tne lore- notice rhp effert Yon * know that l have glven to woraen the 

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wompr I who riawtripri I mv Hisroverv eyelashes become more beautiful — A« d .I have waited until I was sure before 
women wno nave tried my discovery j c ;\u on <-,-,•„„.- tv,~ rUrUnn- offering it to the world at large. The more 

did SO on my guarantee. A nd not a " K ^ a bllKe n lT1 } 1 &^' i . e ,,vi? s than ten thousand women who have tested 
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contrary all have been wildly en- ^ rmv ?^ c °^j] e ^ ^}^Z 
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lashes and eyebrows. Now you can a discovery, found that the roots of the 

haw this h,f>auti7 imrart tr. wvnr eyelashes and eyebrows were marvelously 

nave tnis beauty— impart to your responsive to a certain rare ingredient- 
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What My Discovery Means 
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able — with a noticeable appearance 
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What's become of all the 
homely women? 

Women simply aren't homely any more. 
You meet plain women, yes . . . but 
their smart, trim air is the envy of 
many who are only beautiful. 

In the old days, when a girl gave 
promise of becoming "hopelessly 
plain," she was frankly informed of 
the fact to save her from hurt pride 
in later* years. She remained frumpy 
and tried to convince herself that she 
didn't care! 

Not today! 

Advertising has played a remarkable 
part in making every woman attractive. 

It has taught her to use the beauty 
and charm that are her heritage, re- 
gardless of the shape of her features. 
Her teeth, her hair, her hands, her 
complexion, her clothes, and even her 
erect, athletic figure have been 
"brought out" by methods constantly 
before her in advertising. 

The great beauty and style specialists 
of the country have been her consul- 
tants, as they are yours, if you are 
taking fullest advantage of the oppor- 
tunities before you, in the advertising 
pages of this magazine. 

Read the advertisements. They hold 

secrets oj beauty and style that were 

denied the women oj yesterday 



In the Starry Kingdom 

(Continued from page 12) 



TTaines, William — playing in Excess Baggage — 
"■ Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Hall, James — playing in Just Married — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Hamilton, Neil — playing in Hot News — Para- 
mount Studios, S451 Marathon St., Hollywood. Cal. 

Harron, John — playing in Night Life — Tiffany 
Productions, 933 No. Seward St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Hatton, Raymond — recently completed The Big 
Killing — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Haver, Phyllis — playing in The Battle of the Sexes — 
United Artists Studios, 1041 No. Formosa Ave., Hol- 
lywood, Cal. 

Hersholt, Jean — playing in The Battle of the Sexes, 
— United Artists Studios, 1041 No. Formosa Ave., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Hines, Johnny — playing in The Wright Idea — Tec- 
Art Studios, 5350 Melrose Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Holt, Jack — playing in The Vanishing Pioneer — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Hoxie, Jack — playing in Men of Daring — Universal 
Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Hughes, Lloyd — playing in Heart to Heart — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 



Jannings, Emil — playing in Sins of the Fathers — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Joy, Leatrice — recently completed The Bellamy 
Trial — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, 
Cal. 



TT'eaton, Buster — playing in Snapshots — Metro 
-•-»- Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Kent, Larry — playing in The Head Man — Fox 
Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Kenyon, Doris — playing in The Hawk's Nest — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Kerry, Norman — playing in The Woman From 
Moscow — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

* * * 

I angdon, Harry — playing in Here Comes the Band 
■*-' — First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Lake, Arthur — playing in The Air Circus — Fox 
Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

La Plante, Laura — playing in The Last Warning — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

La Rocque, Rod — playing in Love Over Night — 
Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Lewis, George — playing in Give and Take — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Lloyd, Harold — recently completed Speedy — Har- 
old Lloyd Productions, 1040 Las Palmas Ave., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Loff, Jeannette — playing in Love Over Night — 
Pathe-DeMille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Logan, Jacqueline — playing in Power — Pathe-De 
Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Lorraine, Louise — playing in The Wright Idea — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Love, Bessie — playing in The Matinee Idol— 
Columbia Pictures Corp., 1408 Gower St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Loy, Myrna — playing in Stale Street Sadie — War- 
ner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

Luden, Jack — playing in The Perfumed Trap — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 



A/facDonald, Farrell — recently completed The 4 
- 1 -'- 1 Devils — Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Mackaill, Dorothy — playing in Applesauce — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Marmont, Percy — playing in The Fruit of Divorce 
— Gotham Productions, Fine Art Studios, 4500 Sun- 
set Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

Maynard, Ken — playing in The Phantom City — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

McCoy, Tim — recently completed The Bush Ranger 
■ — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

McGregor, Malcolm — playing in The Girl on the 
Barge — Universal Studios, ITniversal City, Cal. 

McLaglen, Victor — playing in The River Pirate — 
Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Meeker, George — playing in Chicken a la King — 
Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Melghan, Thomas — playing in The Racket — 
Caddo Productions, Hollywood, Cal. 

Menjou, Adolphe — playing in His Private Life — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Miller, Patsy Ruth — playing in Hot Heels — Uni- 
versal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Moore, Colleen — playing in Oh Kay! — First Na- 
tional Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Moran, Lois — playing in The River Pirate — Fox 
Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Moreno, Antonio — playing in The Midnight Taxi 
— Warner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Morton, Charles — playing in None But the Brave 
— Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal. 



Mulhal!, Jack — playing in Applesauce — First Na- 
tional Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Murray, Charles — playing in Sport of Kings — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

* * * 

Nagel, Conrad — playing in War in the Dark — Me- 
tro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Ca!. 

Negri, Pola — playing in The Woman From Moscow 
— Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Nllsson, Anna 0- — playing in The Whip — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Nissen, Greta — playing in The Butter and Egg 
Man — First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Nixon, Marian — playing in Red Lips — Universal 
Studios, L^niversal City, Cal. 

Norton, Barry — playing in Mother Knows Best — 
Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood. Cal. 

Novarro, Ramon — playing in Gold Braid — Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

* * * 



'Brlen, George — playing in Noah's Ark — Warner 
Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 



o 

Cal. 

O'Day, Molly — playing in The Butter and Egg 
Man — First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

O'Neil, Sally — playing in The Girl on the Bar^e — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Oland, Warner — playing in Stand and Deliver — 
Pathe-De Mille Productions, Culver City, Cal. 

Olmstead, Gertrude — playing in The Hit of the 
Show — FBO Studios, 780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 



JJickford, Mary — recently completed My Best Girl 
■*■ — Pickford-Fairbanks Studios, Hollywood, Cal. 

Powell, William — playing in The Perfumed Trap 
— Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Prevos-t, Marie — recently completed The Godless 
Girl — Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Pringle, Aileen — playing in Baby Cyclone — Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



Ralston, Esther — playing in The Sawdust Paradise 
— Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Ralston, Jobyna — playing in The Night Flyer — 
Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Ray, Charles — recently completed The Garden of 
Eden — United Artists Studios, Hollywood, Cal. 

Reynolds, Vera — playing in Walking Back — Pathe- 
De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Rich, Irene — playing in Craig's Wife — Pathe-De 
Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Rogers, Charles (Buddy) — playing in Red Lips — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Roland, Gilbert — playing in Craig's Wife — Pathe- 
De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



Schildkraut, Rudolph — playing in Tenth Avenue 
— Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Sebastian, Dorothy — recently completed Our 
Dancing Daughters — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, 
Culver City, Cal. 

Shearer, Norma — playing in Ballyhoo — Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Sills, Milton — playing in The Barker — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Steele, Bob — playing in Lightning Speed — FBO 
Studios, 780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Stone, Lewis — recently completed The Patriot- 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Swanson, Gloria — playing in The Last of Mrs. 
Cheney — United Artists Studios, Hollywood, Cal. 



Talmadge,' Norma- — playing in The Woman Dis- 
puted — United Artists Studios, 1041 No. Formosa 
Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Taylor, Ruth — playing in Just Married — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Thomson, Fred — playing in Kit Carson — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Todd, Thelma — playing in Heart to Heart — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Tryon, Glenn — recently completed Lonesotne- 
L T niversal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Tyler, Tom — playing in Gun Law — FBO Studios. 
780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 



Valli, Virginia — playing in The Escape — Fox- 
Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood. 
Cal. 

Varconi, Victor — playing in The Divine Lady — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Veidt, Conrad — recently completed The Man Who 
Laughs — Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Vidor, Florence — recently completed The Magni- 
ficent Flirt — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 



indsor, Claire — playing in The Clash — Tiffany 
Productions, 933 No. Seward St., Hollywood, 



w 

Cal. 

Wray, Fay — playing in The First Kiss — Paramount 
Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 



14 




24 New Pictures and the Next Six 
Issues of Motion Picture Magazine 



Subjects : 



Mary Astor 
Clara Bow- 
James Hall 
Jack Holt 
Fred Thomson 
Sally O'Neil 
Ruth Taylor 
Ralph Forbes 
Olive* Borden 
John Gilbert 
Dolores Costello 
Marcelline Day 
Renee Adoree 
Eleanor Boardman 
Charles Farrell 
Tom Mix 
Rudolph Valentino 
Janet Gaynor 
Joan Crawford 
June Collyer 
Vilma Banky 
Ramon Novarro 
Rod LaRocque 
Lloyd Hughes 



You can have this wonderful set of pictures of your favorites if you act 
promptly. For a limited time we offer you this fine set of 24 new gravure 
pictures, size 5]/ 2 by 8 inches, with the next six issues of Motion Picture 
Magazine, for One Dollar. That's a bargain! The pictures are just the 
thing for your den or your collection. Suitable for framing, too. Just pin a 
dollar bill to the coupon and mail to-day. Subscribe for your friends and we 
will send them each a set of pictures. Do it now! 

Canada, tzvcnty-five cents extra — Foreign, fifty cents extra. 

8 M. P. M. 

Motion Picture Publications, Inc., Offer No. 3. 

Paramount Bldg., New York. 

For the enclosed $1.00 please send me the set of twenty-four new 
pictures of motion picture stars and the next six issues of Motion 
Picture Magazine. 

Name . 

Address , 

Start with issue. 



15 




VY/hat promises to be a wow of a pic- 
ture will shortly go into production. 
It is "The Swamp," which Eric von Stro- 
heim is directing for United Artists with 
Gloria Swanson playing the leading role. 
Tully Marshall is in the sup- 
porting cast. 



] aura La Plante will star in another 
mystery picture titled "The Last Warn- 
ing." The success of "The Cat and the 
Canary" has influenced Universal to star 
her in a picture of the same type. 



Loretta Young and Larry Kent are ah 
in the cast. 

A N epic of the North American, "Re< 
■^^ skin," will be Richard Dix's next sta 
ring vehicle for Paramount. 



"C alvage," a story of the early 
days of the San Francisco 
water front, will be Mary Phil- 
bin's next. It will be filmed in 
San Francisco to insure an au- 
thentic film of the Golden Gate. 



'"The Fleet's In," a story 
which quite obviously deals 
with the personnel of the Navy 
while on shore leave, is Clara 
Bow's next starring picture. 



\ >-\ T Christy, Harold Lloyd's 

dding woman in " Speedy," 

n important part in Jack 

.t's new film, "The Water 

Hole," which has Nancy Carroll 

in the leading feminine role. 



The Paramount picture, "Kit 
Carson," which is now in 
production, will show many of 
the most spectacular exploits in 
the life of the famous explorer 
and fighter. Fred Thomson has 
the name part. 



Dicardo Cortez and Claire 
Windsor are making "The 
Grain of Dust" for Tiffany 
under the direction of George 
Archainbaud. 




T^he picture dealing with co 
panionate marriage in a r 
morons vein which Univer 
is planning to film will be kno 
as "You Can't Buy Love" 
stead of "Sex Appeal." 



f^EORGE HaCKATHORNE, wj 

has been absent from I 
screen for a long period, w 
be seen in "Phantom Finger 1 
with Bill Cody and Dua 
Thompson. 



"UTools ix the For,," whij 
has May McAvoy and Co 
rad Nagel in the leading rol| 
has been changed to "Caugh 
the Fog." 



I ina Basquette, Robert Arj 
strong and Clyde Cook hq 
passed their screen test for " 
lebrity." It is a story of a 
mous pugilist and, of course, t 
big scene of the picture is 
world's championship battle 



J" 1 he role of Jule in "Show 
Boat," which Universal is 
making as a special production, 
will be played by Alma Rubens. 
Emily Fitzroy is also in the 



P. & A. 

Adolphe Menjou and Kathryn Carver were married in Paris 

recently. Here you see how happy the newlyweds looked after 

the ceremony. They are shown signing the fatal register which 

made them Mr. and Mrs. 



A lberta Vaughn, whom y 
will remember as the st/ 
of "The Telephone Girl" seri 
has been signed to play the le; 
in "Racing Blood," a series < 
twelve two-reel productions 
be released by FBO. 



cast. 



Paul Fejos will direct "The Charlatan,' 
Conrad Veidt's next for Universal. 



"yj^HEX his contract with M-G-M expires 
in a few weeks, King Vidor may join 
James Cruze in his independent producing 
company. 



"The first film in which the Vitaphone 
will replace all titles will be "The 
Terror." It's a Warner picture with May 
McAvoy, Edward Everett Horton and 
John Miljan. 



"The title of the next Char^ 
Chaplin picture will be "Ci 

Lights." Myrna Kennedy, wl 
was his leading lady in "The Circus," w 
play opposite him. 



JTrancis X. Bushman is planning to re- 
turn to the screen in the film version 
of his vaudeville act, "The Man Higher 
Up." 



"The screen version of the stage play 
"Kongo," which will be titled "West of 
Zanzibar," will be Lon Chaney's next 
picture for M-G-M. It is a mystery melo- 
drama with an African setting. 



f~\ nce again a blonde is preferred. Jeanetj 

Loff will have the feminine lead ovj 

posite Johnny Mack Brown in DeMille 

"Annapolis," instead of Lina Basquette. / 



Johnny Hines's picture, formerly calk 
"Black Magic," will in the future q 



JrpF. Yf.lez will make her first starring 
appearance for United Artists in "The 
Love Song," originally titled "La Paiva." 
William Boyd has been loaned by Pathe 
to play opposite her. 



(^hester Conklin, the Paramount 
' comedian, will play the role of 
Charles Rogers' father, a woe-begone 
college janitor, in Buddy's new picture, 
tentatively called "Varsity." 



known as "The Wright Idea." 
a bright idea. 



Sounds likl 



D illie Dove is taking her orders fro) 
Alexander Korda for the third tin- 
He is directing her in "The Night Watch/ 
"The Yellow Lily" and "The Stolen Bride 



"0° Y° UR Duty," an original screen 

story by Julian Josephson, will be 

Charlie Murray's next. Doris Dawson, 



Debe Daniels will shortly begin work 
her new picture, "Take Me Horn' 
She will have Neil Hamilton opposite 1: 



16 



You'd Never Know 
Aunt Effie Now! 

I DON'T mind telling" you that it was pretty tough on Dick and me for a 
while. Dick's my husband, you know. And except for one thing about him. 
I'd have been perfectly happy. 

That was that he was one of these men with a sense of duty. Strong", you know. 
But not silent. What he thought he spoke. 

So when he felt sorry for Aunt Effie, he said so. 

"She's all alone in the world, with nothing on her mind but her hair," he said. I 
was prompted to make the point that that wasn't hers, but I let it go. 

"We ought to go and see her at least once 
every two weeks. I know it's tiresome. But 
it cheers her up so." 



Maybe it did — if you could live through it. 
Boring wasn't the word. Aunt Effie was 
the human weevil. Her idea of excitement 
was to show you how much better the fruit 
in the bowl on the sideboard looked after 
she'd renewed its schoolgirl complexion with 
water colors. If nature abhors a vacuum, 
it would have shuddered at her mind. 

After two years of this I broke down. 
"Dick," I said, "I can't go on. Something- 
must be done. I can't listen again to the 
story about what Aunt Erne's boy friend 
said to her twenty years ago." 

But Dick was firm. Succinct, but firm. "We 
must," he said. 

I was desperate. Then, as happens once in 
a lifetime, came an idea. I spoke of it to 
Dick. "What that old girl needs," I said, "is 
a good dose of Classic." 

So, at the next ordeal, I left a copy with her. 
When we called two weeks later, she was 
out. And again two weeks after that. We 
had finally to pin her down to a date. 



"I won't be home tonight," she said, "but if 
you like, we can all go to see Passionate 
Petting. They say it's a hot number." We 
went and it was. 

"I knew this was no flop," said Ef — I got to 
calling her that before the evening was over 
— "because Classic gave it a good send-off. 
And Classic said, too " 

We see Ef frequently now. We discuss the 
love-life of Chester Conklin, Jackie Coogan's 
latest divorce and Dolores Del Rio's most 
recent speech before the Epworth League. 

You wouldn't know the old girl now. You 
wouldn't know she was old. In fact, at heart, 
she isn't. Just the other day she was saying: 
"This dress, of course, would be a bit youth- 
ful for Sally Blane, but I think on me " 

And it's all due to Classic. 

I pass on this little slice of life to you. Have 
you any bad relations you want made good? 
Are any of your friends tired of life? Or 
are you ? 

To them or to yourself, administer Classic 
every month. The prescription is one copy 
every thirty days, before or after or during 
meals. 




Motion Picture 

CLASSIC 



It's 
The Magazine 
With The 
Personality 



17 




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Richee 



Except for the fact that she is in it, one might jump to the conjecture that Esther Ralston's 

forthcoming picture, "The Sawdust Paradise," had been developed from "Ten Nights 

in a Barroom." But it cannot be. Esther's charm is of too celestial a sort; and if there 

is a brass rail in her photoplay, it must be the baluster for the golden stairs 




I 



Spurr 



A bird's-eye view, the view being one of Billie Dove, whose popularity seems to have set 

several new world's records both for altitude and sustained flight. She is to alight next 

on the screen in "The Yellow Lily." This, they tell us, was originally entitled "The 

Golden Lily," but the name was changed to cut down expense 




Russell Ball 



To interpret the meaning of Neil Hamilton's smile would call for something combining 

exclamations of both hot dog and good news. Which is natural enough. For he has 

just been assigned the part opposite Bebe Daniels in a new feature. And its title — well, 

isn't that a coincidence, now? — is "Hot News" 




R. H. Louise 



The incentive for anyone to turn over a new leaf is, of course, Anita Page. And here is 
Anita herself. Introduced to pictures through the graces of Harry K. Thaw, she has 
been chosen as the ideal type for the leading feminine role in "While the City Sleeps," the 

star of which is Lon Chaney 




Autrey 



Janet may be the richer for the movies. But that is only fair, for the screen is decidedly 

the Gaynor by her presence upon it. She has recently completed the portrayal of the one 

truly angelic member of "The Four Devils" and now undertakes to enact what must be 

the first half of the title role of "Blossom Time" 




Russell Ball 



Just from his pose, without even a hint of his name, you might guess him to be either one 
or a composite of all of "The Four Devils." But to confirm it definitely, this is Barry 
Norton. He is next to have an important and perhaps a more comfortable role in "Mother 

Knows Best" 




There's likely to be a lot of trouble on account of May McAvoy's next picture. Caught 
in the Fog" it's called, and there may be passed a special state law prohibiting its produc- 
tion within the confines of sunny California. They'll say it's impossible. And indeed, 
what with the bright radiance of May's personality through it all, perhaps it is 



>l 




Harold Dean Carsey 



In appearance and personality, as well as in his name, Donald Reed is reminiscent some- 
what of Wally. He is comparatively a newcomer. But for all that, his is regarded as 
one of the most promising names in First National's ledger. And while this picture may 
prove him high-hatted, no one can say he is high-hat 



The Screen Magazine of Authority 





August, 1928 



Major George K. Shuler, Publisher 



Duncan A. Dobie, Jr., General Manager 



Laurence Reid, Managing Editor 



Camera! 



THE actuality of talking pictures, it is said, has 
thrown a good many people in Hollywood into a 
good measure of panic. They are regarding this 
device with much the same feelings as does a book- 
keeper the shiny new adding machine that has just been 
rolled into the office. They are afraid it is going to take 
away their jobs. 

This apprehension, of course, probably has been present 
in a vague and faint form for some time, for there have 
been intimations these several years of the probability of 
the screen's breaking the silence it hitherto has been 
forced to maintain. But the misgivings really did not 
become acute until the concrete basis for them arrived. 
Fear did not set in seriously until producers began to 
produce talkies and, in consequence, demand of the players 
in them that they be effective audibly as well as visibly. 
Before that, actors were no more perturbed than were 
liverymen at the appearance first of the rumors and a little 
later of the initial few and imperfect examples of the 
horseless carriage. 

Stampede to Learn English 

Dut now they are. There is no doubt of it. The des- 
•D peration of the steps that some of them have under- 
taken makes it manifest beyond question. Certain stars 
have even gone so far as to take measures to learn to 
speak English; and certain scenario writers have been" 
similarly enterprising in regard to the writing of it. 

The situation to them must indeed seem serious. 

As a matter of fact, except to the hopelessly incom- 
petent, it should not be; and for several reasons. 

In the first place, the advent of the audible movie may 
mean only a sharper classification of players according to 
their prime abilities. On the stage, for instance, it is not 
demanded of the musical comedy star that she be able to 
do Ibsen. It is enough that she be able to dance, say, and 
sing a little and look pretty a great deal. If she can do 
those things, she satisfies her audience entirely. So, too, 
with the dramatic actress. Her public does not expect of 
her a versatility including excellence in the Charleston. 

Indeed, the element of sound is an assistant to everyone. 
Where a woman's voice is dramatically good, it is to her 
advantage; where it is not, then music and dancing are 
brought into play. 



Putting Them in Their Places 

And if this is so in the theater, it should be the case on 
■ the screen. The gay little flapper whose charm lies 
in the gaiety of her flapping will be entrusted with no 
more ; and she will be surrounded with settings and music 
to enhance her appeal. And this, as a matter of fact, 
should present her in a far more favorable light than 
would her appearance in roles not only too heavy for her 
to speak but, as is often the case now, too heavy for her 
to enact. 

Again, it is to be remembered that many a motion 
picture star has a very excellent voice and the ability to 
use it. This, where it is the case, would make of the 
talkie a greater opportunity. And still again, many a 
player only moderately effective before the camera, will, 
by reason of her uncommon gift for speaking lines, be 
able to rise to heights now denied her. The favorites of 
the stage are, by and large, far from the magazine-cover 
prettiness of those of the screen. Yet their popularity, 
within the range of their appeal, is quite as strong; and 
it is far more enduring. 

Vocal Doubles Likely 

Moreover, for valuable screen players who neither can 
sing nor speak presentably no matter how they may 
study and practise, it is well within possibility that pro- 
vision will be made. The producers, having built up 
personalities through the expenditure of several millions 
of dollars for publicity, should be able to contrive vocal 
doubles, people unseen, to say or sing what the player 
seems to be uttering. Indeed, if the pictures are to be 
exported, this will be necessary ; the action that is filmed 
and recorded in Hollywood will have to be spoken — by 
someone — in the language of its audience. In French 
for the French, and so on. And it can hardly be expected 
of Americans generally to speak French that will be 
understood in Paris. 

In short, while talking pictures are here in fact and 
here for good, there would seem to be little reason for 
established players to feel like self-conscious children 
over their bad tonsils or adenoids. It may not be neces- 
sary to operate; and, indeed, where it is, the thing may 
not be nearly so bad as its anticipation. 

27 



M 



re Screen 




Do Film Lovers Put Their 
Heart — Or Merely Their 
Art — Into Their Work? 

By Helen Carlisle 



From left to 
right: Richard Bar- 
thelmess and Doris 
Dawson ; Richard Dix and 
Jean Arthur; and Jack Mul 
hall and Dorothy Mackaill 



THE handsome youth crossing the 
stage looked like Dick Barthelmess. In 
fact, he was Dick Barthelmess, so I made a flying 
leap toward him, as what right-minded woman un- 
der seventy would not ? 

"Air. Barthelmess," I asked, "when you are enacting 
love scenes, before the camera, I mean, are they purely 
mechanical with you ? When you embrace a lovely lead- 
ing woman, are you thinking only of lights, camera angles, 
whether you are getting the proper amount of footage, 
whether the lady may be trying to take the scene from 
you, and so on? Or does the human element enter into 
these passionate scenes ? Are you, for the time being, 
somewhat enamored of the lady herself ? 

"In one sentence," I concluded — and it was about time 
— "is screen love-making just part of the day's job or is 
it a rather pleasant experience?" 

Mr. Barthelmess regarded me sadly, which is not sur- 
prising. He always looks that way. 

"Purely mechanical," he said briefly. "I never think 
of the girl in a personal sense." 

"Well, that's a nice thing to say!" Dorothy Mackaill, 
on whose set we were standing, came up and slipped her 
arm through his. "I worked in two pictures with you, 
'The Fighting Blade' and 'Shore Leave,' and I was madly 
in love with you all the time. Really I was. But you were 
married." 

"And now you are," said Dick, which just shows how 
things go in this unsatisfactory world. 

"I fall in love with my leading men," declared Dorothy. 

28 



"I couldn't work satis- 
^-" J factorily with one who 

had no personal attrac- 
tion for me. During love scenes I forget the camera, the 
director, everybody but the man who is playing the scene 
with me. I'm in love with him, at the time, anyway." 

Oddly enough, most of the men players to whom I put 
my very personal questions agreed with Dorothy — the 
women with Dick. Perhaps this is because Dorothy has 
a man's frankness, while Barthelmess is cautious. 

"God bless us, yes !" exclaimed Jack Mulhall, the irre- 
sistible Irishman. "I adore attractive girls. Always 
have, always will. When I am playing a love scene with 
some pretty girl, she is the embodiment of all feminine 
charms to me, and of all the lovely girls I've ever known 
or hope to know in future. 

"Let it never be said of me that I make love in a me- 
chanical manner. I'm no Robot, I hope. It is generally 
agreed that girls throughout the country place themselves 
in the movie heroine's place. I'm glad if that is true. 
For when I make love to the girl on the screen, I'm mak- 
ing love to them all." 



Kisses 




Beginning at the 
top: Lane Chand- 
ler and Clara Bow; 
George Bancroft and Eve- 
lyn Brent; and William 
Powell and Mary Brian 



Richard Dix bad a slightly different angle. 

"You can't leave it all up to the man," he declared, 
crashing back and forth across his dressing-room in the 
manner which is Richard's own. 

"Sometimes an actress is unresponsive. An amateur, 
perhaps, and camera-shy. When I'm working with such 
a girl, it's hard to lose myself in my part. Gee ! In the 
middle of a clinch she may get her elbow in my eye, 
which is enough to take all the sentiment out of a love 
scene, real or on the screen. 

"But if she is responsive, and a trained actress, I never 
think of the cameras nor the staring visitors from Yap 
Corner, Iowa. I'm making love just to her. 

"An actor is called upon to portray different kinds of 
|Jove, though. One characterization may demand snappy, 
up-to-date love-making. At such times I think only of 
the girl I'm working with. Another characterization re- 
quires a spiritual love. Then I think only of my mother 
all through the scenes. Don't even see the girl. But I 
can't remember a time when I thought of camera angles, 
footage and so forth, when I went into a love scene. 
Not Rich!" 



"The Flaming Flapper" a Surprise 

V/"ou'd expect something hot from Clara Bow, the Flam- 

A ing Flapper, wouldn't you ? When Clara goes after 

her man, she burns up the celluloid. Yet Clara fools us. 

Sitting on the steps of her dressing-room in the pale 
sunshine of a spring day, Clara shook her head gravely 
and declared that she never thinks of her screen lovers in. 
a personal way. 

"I never know they're there," is the way she put it. 
"Screen love-making doesn't mean a thing to me. I am 
the character I portray, and that's all there is to it.' I 
never know whether my leading man has gray, blue or 
brown eyes, and I'm never the least bit in love with him, 
no matter how intense our love scenes may appear on the 
screen." 

Nor does the handsome screen leading man mean a 
thing to Corinne Griffith. While such a statement from 
Clara may surprise us, one rather expects it of the lovely, 
remote Corinne, and she fulfils our expectations when 
she says that she plays only for characterization. Victor 
Varconi, who is appearing opposite her in "The Divine 
Lady," wasn't on the set when we talked with Corinne, 
or we would have drawn him into the discussion. - A 
mere outsider would assume that it might be quite 
{Continued on page 90) 

29 



_ 




Carewe//^ to Animals 



Russell Ball 



Hardly, for even to her dumb friends Dolores del Rio is the soul of kindness ; and the action of her next picture, 
"Revenge," as directed by Edwin Carewe, calls for no ill-treatment of the bear that sits like a man 



30 




Aoutk^jeasick 



If Monte Was Blue When He 
Went There, He Came 
Back a Vivid Indigo 



By Dorothy Calhoun 



IF a certain author ever visits Hollywood, he is 
hereby advised to wear false whiskers and call 
himself "O'Donovan" instead of "O'Brien." 
This author once wrote a book — such a 
glamourous book about the South Seas that aged 
millionaires and staid college professors and 
hardened movie producers dreamed, after reading- 
it, of tropic moons and bare brown limbs whirling 
in the hula hula, and flowers as large as hogs- 
heads. He wrote about lovely — and loving — 
ladies with such charming names as Gaga (Love 
Talk) and Pepi (Some Kid), who offered bowls 
of poi while one reclined languidly on a mat in a 
thatched hut. He wrote of an earthly paradise 
where one has not a care in the world. 

He neglected to mention that the tropic moon- 
light was malarial, the bare brown limbs were 
pudgy, and the thatched hut was inhabited by 
scorpions and centipedes. He knew, did Mr. 
Frederick O'Brien, that all civilized people are 
hungry for romance, and homesick for the 
jungle, and he gave them what they wanted. 
After all, the South Seas were a long distance 
off, and Cook didn't run a tour there. 

The Metro-Goldwyn company that has been 
in Tahiti for five months filming "White Shadows 
in the South Seas" would like to meet Mr. 
O'Brien personally. They have read his book, and they 
want to talk it over with him, somewhere where the 
police won't interfere. Not, of course, you understand 
that Director W. S. Van Dyke or Monte Blue, or any 
member of their company of sixty went to Papeete to 
see hula dancers or to have native belles hang wreaths 
around their necks. Their purpose (you understand) 
was solely to produce some Art. But they can't help 
feeling that Mr. O'Brien had his tongue in his cheek 
while writing that book. Instead of being a place where 
one forgets his troubles, the South Seas, so far as they 
are concerned, is a place where one discovers a whole lot 
of new troubles he never even thought of before. 

Leprosy and Canned Salmon 

After five months of being rained on, scorched dry by 
t a fierce sun, bitten by the entire collection of Tahitian 
insectivora, exposed to leprosy, elephantiasis and other 
interesting diseases, bored almost to the murder point by 
the unmitigated company of each other, fed on tinned 
salmon until the very sight of a can opener turns them 
pale, the exiles from Hollywood have returned with an 
interesting theory. 




Raquel Torres and Monte Blue 

and the South Seanery of the 

Island of Tahiti, where "White 

Shadows" was filmed 



The South 
Seas of ro- 
mance exist 
only in books 
like Mr. 
O'Brien's and 
in moti o n 
pictures such 
as they have 
brought back 
w i t h the m, 
which has in- 
spired the 
Metro-Goldwyn publicity department to such lyric out- 
bursts as these : 

"The first true story of the South Seas, Southern skies, 
passionate women, and the coming of the white man to 
a. strange land. The most beautiful scenery, the most 
interesting people ever filmed." 

Yet — says Monte Blue feelingly, the South Seas are 
the bunk ! The legend of their loveliness is a lie. The 
romantic beach-comber is in reality a shiftless tramp, the 
{Continued on page 82) 



31 




Shooting The Works 

The patriarchs at the Hague peace court are in for a jolt early this month. They're going to 
think a young world war has broken out unannounced. For Marceline Day has lumped all 
her fireworks together and is going to set 'em off that way. Marceline is all for making the 

Fourth of Julively 



32 




for 




Sake 



Bigger and Better Orgies Mark 
The Spectacle Whose Expenses Know Noah Limit 



By Herbert Cruikshank 



C 



The 



ALL out the 
guard ! The 
King's 
Guard!" 
command re- 
verberated through 
the length of the or- 
nate pagan temple. It 
seemed to come 
through the smoke 
that curled from the 
lascivious lips of the 
evil, hideous idol to 
which twenty virgins 
had just been sacri- 
ficed. 

The priests in their 
turreted hats and long 
yellow robes looked 
toward the throne 
which faced the idol from far 
clown at the other end of the 
temple. A bevy of courtezans, 
their soft, full mouths stained a 
a shameless scarlet, clustered 
closer to their imperial master. 
Brown-bellied slaves fed in- 
cense burners taller than them- 
selves. A thousand spears 
glistened with each slight 
movement of the ancient na- 
tion's fighting men. Nearly 
naked dancing girls paused in 
their abandoned steps, flower 
garlands poised high in air. 

"Where in hell is the King's 
guard ! Hey, you guys, get the 
hell up there by the King ! And 
hold your positions ! This 
ain't no holiday ! We're makin' 
a pitcher here!" 

Even so. The good looking 
young assistant director 

through 




Dolores Costello and George O'Brien as 
they appear in "Noah's Ark" 



shouted instructions 

a telephone-like instrument, 

and his words hurtled through 

a half-dozen loud speakers skilfully concealed in the 

frescoes of the temple. An assistant cameraman struck 

a match on the idol's eye. A priest removed his chin 

whisker to mop perspiration from his face. One of 

the King's courtezans languidly refreshed her cud of 

gum. And His Majesty parked the cigar against that time 

when he might again discard his kingly mien. 



It was all Hollywood. 



Even the virgins. 



Or at least that portion 
of it that has to do with 
days beyond recall. There 
is a modern sequence, too. 
For the argument of the 
drama is that as the an- 
cient world was cleansed 
by the turbulent 
waters of the del- 
uge, so the world 
w e kno w w a s 
washed free of sin 
in the blood of 
thirty million 
lambs who were 
sacrificed in the 
World War. 

The photoplay 
was "Xoah's Ark." 
Before it is com- 
pleted, Michael 
Curtiz. the direc- 
tor, will shoot 
three hundred 
thousand feet of film, while 
the valiant Warner Brothers' 
total production figures will 
exceed a million dollars. And 
this million, in the end, 
will be represented by the 
twelve thousand feet of film 
which will finally be shown 
to you. 

One Set, One Quarter Million 

t is said there never were such crowds 
assembled, that there never were such 
gigantic sets in the history of filmdom. 
If the huge proportions have been ever 
exceeded, it is by a matter of feet — or 
inches. The temple set is three hundred 
feet long. Its width is over seventy-five 
feet, and the actual height sixty feet, al- 
though it will appear more lofty through 
miraculous photography from'the camera 
genius, Hal Mohr. Even the picture 
people themselves are impressed. Bill 
Koenig, the boyish- faced studio execu- 
tive, almost removed his hat in reverence 
as he whispered the cost of the set — a quarter million of 
dollars. Not drachma, or dinari — dollars — coin of the 
realm. 

The chief electrician will tell you that it takes twenty- 
five thousand amperes of light to illuminate the scene. 
That there are over one hundred and fifty sun-arcs, be- 
side the other lights. The sun-arcs are the largest, you 
(Continued on page 94) 

33 




ouh in Plaster 



William Mortensen, The Mask-Master, 
Brought to the Movies His Art and Fay Wray 



Six years ago a young man rode 
out of Salt Lake City on a 
motor-cycle. The machine, bat- 
tered and wheezing, forty-five dollars, and a head- 
ful of dreams — these were all that he owned in the world. 
In the high school where he had been teaching they had 
decided that dreams were dangerous. What they wanted 
of a teacher was dates and formulas and rules, so they 
had told the young man that he had better go before his 
dreams did any further damage. And here he was, rid- 
ing out of town, with his face set toward California. 

On the edge of town he passed a hay wagon, with a 
girl sitting on top of the load, swinging bare legs beneath 
a ragged skirt. Dark hair framed her face — a face that 
caught his artist's eye. He knew suddenly and with cer- 
tainty that that little girl, perched on the hay, was one day 
going to be one of the world's great beauties ! 

In a humble settlement on the outskirts of town the 
hay wagon stopped. Sliding down from the load, the little 
girl disappeared into one of the cottages. With forty-five 
dollars in his pocket and a fortune in dreams in his head, 
the young man followed. "Your daughter is beautiful," 
he informed the astonished woman who answered his rap. 
"I'm going to Hollywood. Let her go with me." 

Oh, it takes a dreamer to do improbable things ! He 
stood there, shabby, jobless, a gaunt young man who had 

34 



By Ann Cummings 



high 



just been unfrocked by the 
school authorities because he pre- 
ferred to teach beauty instead of 
weights and measures, and somehow he made them see 
what he saw, a glamourous future for a little shantytown 
girl with tangled hair and a faded dress. 

Rainbow Bound 

T ater, with guardianship papers signed, the motor- 
*—* cycle was off toward California, plop-plop, and this 
time it carried two, a young artist and a child going to 
find the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. There 
have been strange fortune-seekers who have come to 
Hollywood, but none stranger than these two, William 
Mortensen and Fay Wray. 

Of the fortune that Fay found, presently, everyone has 
heard. She trudged about the studios, played small parts, 
went to high school, grew up to be a young lady and be- 
came a movie star. And when the publicity department 
came to write her life story, there was nothing mentioned 
of a load of hay, or a journey on the back of a battered 
motor-cycle. 

Fan magazines are filled with her strange, wistful type 
of beauty, but no one has seen the pictures Bill made of 
her • once, when they were too poor to afford a photog- 
(Conti-niicd on page 114) 




After many moons, Mary Pickford has 
finally persuaded her senor partner, Douglas 
Fairbanks, to stand still long enough to have 
his portrait taken with her. Both Mr. Fair- 
banks, alias The Caucho, and Miss Pickford 
are cinematograph players 



he G anchors Jiest Girl 



35 



—^■^^^^^^^■b 



- — 



V 





an, 




Back to the German silver- 
sheet returns Camilla Horn, 
after appearing opposite 
John Barrymore in "Tem- 
pest" and so — as was fit- 
ting and expected — taking 
Hollywood by storm 



Gossip of the 



TT doesn't pay to jump to conclusions. Recently a 
well-known newspaper woman sent her assistant 
over to First National to scout around and find out 
something that Avas supposed to be kept secret. Wan- 
dering about the lot, he came upon Dorothy Mackaill 
and pounced on her. "What is going to be the 
name of your next picture?" he inquired. Dorothy 
looked coy. "Dunt esk!" she answered. The next 
morning in flaunting headlines the newspaper 
woman's column announced a scoop ! "DORO- 
THY MACKAILL TO CHANGE TYPE. WILL 
PLAY JEWISH GIRL IN NEW PICTURE, 
'DUNT ESK!'" 

"^^HAT," asked a magazine writer of Estelle Tay- 
lor, "was your most embarrassing moment?" 
Estelle considered. The worm will turn after a cer- 
tain number of interviews! "My most embarrassing 
moment," said she deliberately, "was when your hus- 
band tried to pat my knee under the table-cloth at the 
last party Ave Avere on." 

JT is said that when Joe Schenck called Gilbert Row- 
land into his private office not long ago, the new 
sheik of the United Artists' lot Avent Avith lagging feet, 
expecting bad news. Instead, the producer looked at 
him keenly over his neAvspaper. "I hear, young man," 
said he, briskly, "that you've been gambling." 




K. II. Louise 



Blossoming out, indeed, as one of the most magnetic attractions of the 

screen today: Dorothy Sebastian. That is apparent even without 

the floral suggestion 



More chinned against than chinning are Evelyn Brent and Clive 

Brook in this one of them noble, silent-suffering scenes wherein love 

is cast aside for the principle of the thing 




Hommel 



36 







vcus v 



Stars and Studios 



Gilbert nodded. He had lost four thousand dollars 
at bridge, he admitted. 

"Too much for a young fellow just starting out," 
said Schenck. "Promise me you won't do it again." 

And he wrote out a check for the full amount and, 
without another word, handed it to the astonished 
actor. 

DY the way, here's a laugh I found in an old copy of 
JJ the "Los Angeles Times," about 1916: "FINAN- 
CIAL NOTE," it ran, "Mr. Joseph Schenck and Miss 
Norma Talmadge, celebrated motion picture actress, 
were married yesterday." 

QPENINGS. Lots of them. The new Warner 
Brothers' Theater starts off with Al Jolson offici- 
ating. Al matched his record for stories this time. 
His hottest was about a King of ancient Egypt whose 
valet was the great-great-grandfather of Jolson. One 
day, as he stepped out of his bath, the King was 
greatly incensed Avhen his valet came into the room 
and smote him playfully on the behind. "How, O 
varlet," roared the King, "durst you slap me so, on the 
behind ?" 

Al's great-great-grandfather bowed humbly. "I 
beg your pardon, O King," he apologized earnestly, 
"I assure you my act was entirely unintentional. I 
mistook you for the Queen." 




Striped for the bath: 
Agnes Franey, lately 
a dancer in "Rio 
Rita" and Ziegfeld's 
"Follies," and pres- 
ently to be presented 
in piclures by War- 
ner Brothers 



~1 




Colleen Moore wants it clearly understood that her playmate is not — 
despite appearances — a wolf in sheep's clothing. He is a one-hour- 
old Shetland pony and his name is Sam 

Something quite important on his chest, but in no great hurry to get it 
off: Clive Brook being hovered over by Billie Dove and unquestion- 
ably having a bird of a time 



37 




AH the Gossip of the 

QPEAKING of his golf game, Jolson admitted 
ruefully that his might be better. "The only 
mistake I make," said he, "is standing too close 
to the ball after I've hit it." 

"(COMPANIONATE marriage may be ended," 
^- / says Bill Haines, 'but the baby lingers 
on—" 

DUT to go back to our openings. "The Trail 

of '98" premiere was one of the most bril- 
liant I have ever attended. All the diamonds 
were out -of the moth balls. Joan Crawford, 
having just been named as corespondent in the 
afternoon's papers, was there, unperturbed, 
with Doug, Junior. No one has been able to 
find out whether they are really married, but 
she receives telegrams and letters addressed to 
Mrs. Douglas Fairbanks, Junior, and signed (so 
they say) "your loving husband, Doug." 

'PHE prologue announced as a unique attrac- 
tion an "American tenor who can sing one 
full note higher than any other tenor on earth." 
Why not stage a contest for tenors? 

"\X7HXCH reminds me that the art gallery at 
the New Roosevelt Hotel has long rows 
of paintings bearing the reassuring legend, 
"Best Art at Cheapest Prices." 



JJDUISE FAZENDA gives Dr. Frank Crane 
authority for the following little tale, which, 
of course, makes it respectable. An elderly minister 
attended a brilliant dinner party at which he was 
seated beside an attractive young woman in a very 
low-necked gown. The minister kept glancing at 
her curiously and finally leaned forward. "I beg 
your pardon, Madam," he asked, "but I would like to 
ask you a question. What keeps your grown up?" 



In the top corner is Ethel Jack- 
son, who would rather her name 
be prominent within the brown 
covers of the casting directory 
than — as it has been — between 
the blue bindings of the Los 
Angeles social register 



If haircuts were our only guide, 
we'd wonder whether the gentle- 
man before us were John Gilbert 
or Gilbert Roland. Only one 
thing tells us it's the latter: his 
unwaveringly Normal outlook 



The three big noises in "The 
Racket" are Louis Wolheim, 
Marie Prevost and Thomas 
Meighan — whose name, in char- 
acter, we suppose, will be Two- 
Star Hennessey 



f 




Stars and Studios 



The young - thing shrugged her shoulders. 
"Only your advanced age!" she replied. 

SEE that Jack Dempsey has finally won his 
law-suit over his former manager, Kearns, 
and Lillian Gish has won hers over her former 
fiance, Duell. Both of these suits have lingered 
along over two years and have cost fortunes to 
fight. They tell me that Lillian has spent all 
of her savings in defending hers. 

NEW beauty doctor has come to town. He 

guarantees to remove the scars of one's 
operations! "It's this way," he explains; "most 
women who have had operations get a good 
deal of pleasure describing their experience to 
their friends. But after a while there is noth- 
ing more to be said on. that subject. If they 
can have their scars removed, that gives them 
another interesting thing to talk about." He 
knows his operations, that one ! 

'pHYRA SAMPTER WINSLOW, the writer, 
who came West to make a photoplay of her 
book, "The Show Business," for Famous Play- 
ers, has a small, very fluffy Pomeranian, the 
color of a beige fox fur, which she is in the habit 
of carrying about with her under one arm 
dog has become so accustomed to it that he 
remains motionless and resigned under the con- 
fining elbow. The other day, as Thyra was 
Avalking along Hollywood Boulevard, a woman 
passing by stopped and stared closely at the 
Pom. Then she walked ahead, paused as if still doubt- 
ful about something, and came back again to scrutinize 
the funny little animal. Then she burst into delighted 
laughter. "Do excuse me," she begged, "but I made 
such an odd mistake. From a distance I thought tliat 
that tvas a dog." 

„. e .... -J^C/mtinucd on page 106) 

descer, 

of B/ ^__ ^ 

retu/ 

f re/ 



By this time Earle Foxe — at the 
top — should know the ropes of 
movie acting. After playing 
comedies for years, he's just 
been entrusted with the execution 
of a character role in "Hang- 
man's House" 



Don't pity the poor sailors on a 
day like this — the day of Ruth 
Hurst's visit to the battleship 
California. She proved a far 
better life-saver than the one 
she's holding 



Women, so brave men say, are 
never so charming as when angry. 
It's an idea, anyway — for here 
is Thelma Todd at her loveliest 
and — for some reason or other — 
plainly on her ear 



Hesser 



39 







l^rown 



Willy and Gussie of 
Danish Pastry that Would 

By Dorothy Spensley 



^m' 



business. He took the bee from bijou and put it 

in the producers' bonnets. Now they don't have to 

hock the Rolls-Royce to buy real diamond tiaras 

from Tiffany's when Esther Ralston 

plays a duchess. They have Willy 

make them in paste. 

Willy now has a little two-acre ranch 
in San Fernando Valley, adjacent to 
Hollywood, and a car that's paid for. 
It pays to know your karats. 



Gems for Ferns 

l_J e supplies artificial jewelry to five 
major studios, Paramount, First 
National, Fox, Warner Brothers, 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. To Paramount 
he sells his product ; to the others he 
rents each piece, at a price that ranges 
from two dollars to much higher, not 
per day, but for the length of a picture. 



ALL that glitters is not gold." I should say not. 
Do you think Fd be sitting here hemming 
doilies, if it was? Me, with my gold-mine 
stock and my oil stock. 

Do you think Fd be sitting here, knitting wash cloths, 
if it had been a real diamond ring that the hosiery 
drummer gave me ? 

It goes to prove that old adages, like old wine, are 
best. 

' 'All that glitters is not gold' . . . nor precious 
stones,'' said Willy Petersen-Fagerstam and 
tossed the Kohinoor back into a cardboard 
box with the Excelsior and the Cullinan. It 
clinked against a ruby the size of a pigeon's 
egg, knocked a couple of hundred-karat sap- 
phires out of the way and came to a sparkling 
pause by the side of a jumbo-sized emerald. 

Aladdin, you should lamp that collection. 

From a table covered with dust and last 
night's I/crald, he picked up a diamond- 
studded bracelet. Sapphires, bluer than 
melancholy, shimmered out from it. A wide 
band of splendor it was, fit for Queen Scher- 
herazade's arm. Or that of Pola Negri. 

In a corner of the room Noah's distaff, ser- 
pent entwined, jeweled, was being gilded. Some 
of the Russian crown jewels, double-eagled and 
all. were on the table. 

Pinch me, Ali Baba, and see if I'm awake, but 
first put more glue on that scale. 

Willy Petersen-Fagerstam is the paste gem artist 
of Hollywood. He is the mock-jeweler of the film 

40 



And when you have two hundred young ladies of the 

Empire period to jewel for a grand ballroom sequence, 

you can imagine the number of ear- 



rings, bracelets, brooches. 




chokers, dog-collars, pendants, 
buckles and what-not tdiat 
must be supplied. There are 
revenues therefrom. 

Maybe you thought 

those lovely bangles that 

Dolores del Rio wore in' 

"The Loves of Car- \ 

men" were handed ■ 

down from some 

ancestral dona. 

They weren't. They 

were fashioned on 

the slightly dusty 

work-table of Willy. 

Brass he uses 

mostly in creating the 

larger, more massive 

pieces, coating it with 

silver paint and' gold. 



At the top, Willy Petersen- 
Fagerstam displays an array of 
his gems worth their weight in 
celluloid. Below, Dolores del 
Rio in a sparkling head-dress 
of no less value 



/ 




ewe Is «/ Holly wood 



Copenhagen Make— Overnight 
Dazzle the Queen of Sheba 



On the smaller, modern baubles, that can be 
rented over and over again, he uses sterling" 
silver. And on every piece, great or small, 
he uses the utmost care and all the skill 
taught him in his years of apprenticeship in 
Copenhagen. He commenced to learn the 
craft when he was fourteen. 

And those hammered silver and gold 
pieces that Bebe Daniels wore in "She's a 
Sheik." Did you think they were sent from 
Arabia by a desert admirer ? Willy did those, 
too, working fourteen hours a day, Gussie 
by his side. Gussie is Willy's sole staff. 

Gussie was Gussie Petersen. Willy was 
Willy Fagerstam. And when they married 
in Denmark, they became Mr. and Mrs. 
Willy Petersen-Fagerstam. It must be an 
old Danish custom. 

Florence Vidor, the Countess Anstcr- 
mann of "The Patriot," the newest Jan- 
nings picture, wears a gorgeous array of 
Russian jewels, all made by Willy. 

Crown Jewels While You Wait 

There is not a period in gem history that 
he does not know. An intense desire for that 

knowledge led him to the museums of Scandinavi 

at Stockholm and Christiania. Ravag 

ing them of their information, he 

descended upon the museums 

of Berlin, Paris, Vienna, and 

returned to Copenhagen 

freighted with gem data. 
He can re-create the 

breastplates that Cleo- 
patra wore when she 

first shook hands with 

Mark Antony. The 

sapphires that Napo- 
leon favored are 

mounted in faithful 

reproduction by Willy. 

Russian crown jewels, 

the Kohinoor as it 

was when presented 

to Queen Victoria, 

the regal gems of 

Louis XIV, all come 

from his nimble fingers. 
Pola Negri has not 

made a picture for four 

years that has not been 

jeweled by Willy. 




sort o 
a, thos 



Florence Vidor's brilliant neck- 
lace and earrings are copies of 
Imperial Russian jewels 




Vera Voronina, left, an<- 

Esther Ralston, above, 

bedecked in diamonds of 

the purest paste 



The brilliant gems of Greta Garbo's "Love," 
f nee "Anna Karenina," were supplied by Willy, 

e He picked up a brace of crystal earrings, delicately 

fashioned. A stray sunbeam turned them into iridescent 
raindrops. They looked like Cartier or Tiffany. 

"It took me only an hour to make them. The materials 
cost about two dollars. And they look like the real 
thing." 
Yeh, and so did that diamond ring the hosiery 
drummer gave me. 

The imitation Kohinoors, Excelsiors and Cul- 

linans, along with paste rubies, emeralds and 

pseudo-precious stones he orders by the gross 

from Czecho-Slovakia. Perfect reproductions 

of famous stones, correct to minute defects. 

errors in cutting, tiny cracks, are supplied. 

Other materials he gets locally. But the 

talent, the ingenuity, is Willy's. 

His interest now is in the cubes and angles 

of modernistic jewelry. But it cannot last, 

this bizarre craze. It is only a passing fancy. 

American women have too much money to 

spend on trinkets and this will meet the mood 

of the moment. 

"In Europe they do not have so much money 
to spend on jewelry. One set of jewels lasts a 
lifetime. We take greater care in making them. 
Much carving and work we put into it. The 
settings are intricately done. But here it is the 
jewel that counts. The mounting means prac- 
tically nothing. 

This is true of the more conservative European. 
Hommel (Continued on page 110) 



41 




Lansing 
Brown 



Y 



writing 



OUR impressions of our great and progressive 
city?" I challenged Walter Byron. I had been 
old-fashioned enough to wait a decent interval 
after Mr. Byron's arrival in Hollywood before 
my interview. The more up-to-date magazines 
already had his first thoughts on America, the name of 
his favorite poet and his views on divorce humming 
through the printing-presses — when he was still on the 
Atlantic. 

"Let me see," pondered Vilma Banky's newly imported 
movie swain. "Perhaps my most gratifying discovery 
here has been that I could continue to sing my favorite 
song in my hath every morning without fear of contra- 
diction. The song, you know, is 'There is a Tavern in 
the Town.' " 

He pondered further. There seemed to be a constric- 
tion of some sort in his "impressions-of-your-city" outlet. 

"Ah, die motor horns," he said finally. "That is a 
point of interest, I think. I have just spent some weeks 
in Paris making a picture, and the 'toot-toot' and 'pip-pip' 
of those taxi horns still ring in my cars. Now they inform 
me that Los Angeles lias more cars in it than the whole 
of France and Italy put together. Each one is equipped 
with a klaxon, but you never hear anybody use it." 

"Mr. Byron," I put in, "don't tell me that on your first 
visit to America and Hollywood the only things that have 
struck you are the motor horns and the fact that there 
is a tavern in the town?" 

"Well, not exactly," he replied, a little abashed. "There 
was, for example, the expression on the faces of the 
motorists who passed me when I took a fifteen-mile 

42 




etter 



Than He 






(c)Xpected 



Walter Byron Left England 
Prepared for Jolly Well Any- 
thing, So Even Hollywood 
Didn't Give Him Much of 
a Pain 

By Cedric Belfrage 



morning stroll to Burbank and back yester- 
day. I gather that anybody who uses his two 
feet here is regarded as more or less potty. Am 
"ght?" 
But, Mr. Byron," I cried in alarm, ignoring hs 
question, "Hollywood? The stars? The parties? The 
studios ? The climate ? Miss Banky ? The Montmartre ? 
The Grove — the Beach Club — the Morgue ? The palatial 
Beverly homes ?" He 
boggled blankly at me ^ gsg^m^. 

as the questions came. I 

"The whisky?" I added, 
clutching desperately at 
this last straw. 

Scotching Insubordina- 
tion 

Oe brightened. "Oh, 
yes, 1 had some up 
at Louis Wolheim's place 
the other day — wonder- 
ful stuff, exactly the 
•same as we get over the 
bar in Leicester Square." 
There was another pause. 
"Come to think of it, 
Sam Goldwyn gave me 
a snifter one time, too. 
It was the day I got 
temperamental and 
threatened to take the 
next train home." 

Mr. Byron relapsed 
into musing melancholy. 
He did not appear to be 
having a particularly 
fruity time in Holly- 
(Coiitiiwcd on page 104) 





) 



Russeu Ball 



A cuff on the ear. But, we ask, what fur, what fur? What has little Laura La Plante 

done to deserve such treatment? Nothing, so far as can be made out, except to steal 

more and more of everyone's heart with her every appearance on the screen 



43 



hat Becomes of 

The Merry— Arid Otherwise — 
Dispose of Them Variously 








Beginning at the top and from 
left to right are Marie Prevost, 
Pauline Garon,' Virginia Brown 



• aire, 



Claire 
Hedda 



Windsor 
Hopper 




THEY send their old clothes home to relatives, or 
else turn them over to some good second-hand 
house. They trade their old cars in on new ones — 
if the finance company doesn't get 'em first. Their 
old contracts are torn up for new ones — if they're lucky. 
Their old ideas are replaced with new philosophies. Their 

old ambitions are filed away 'for fresher schemes, but 

Say, what do you suppose they do with their old wed- 
ding rings? 

That little band of gold with which they once took vows 
to love, honor and obey? 

That little gold circlet that at one time stood for so 
much happiness, or unhappiness, or alimony, as the case 
may have been? 
That is a question. 

Some of the Hollywood ladies refused to answer. 
Maybe it meant too much to discuss carelessly in print. 



Or maybe it didn't mean enough. 
Pauline Garon* cute and pert, had 
to think it over. Not that she didn't 
know what she had done with her wedding 
ring, but she wasn't quite sure whether or 
not she wanted to tell the world. Cute and 
pert as she is, Pauline took marriage rather 
seriously. Finally she said, "I still wear mine." 
She put out her hand and, yes, sir, there it was, that 
little band of platinum and diamonds on the same hand 
that Lowell Sherman had put it the day they were 
married. Not on the same finger. But the same hand. 
"I don't wear it on the same finger because it doesn't mean 
the same," Pauline explained. "But I'll never stop wear- 
ing it on the same hand. I have several rings that I have 
willed to relatives and friends if I should die. But I 
want to be buried in my wedding ring. I suppose if you 
print that, they'll say I'm still in love with Lowell. It 
isn't that. It's just a little sentiment." 

(The curtain is lowered to denote a change in mood and 
outlook — on wedding rings.) 

Memory in Pawn 

Tenter Priscilla Bonner, very gaily. Since Priscilla 
*—* emerged from • the moth-balls and cast aside her 
blighted butterfly complex, she's an entirely new girl. You 
wouldn't recognize the new Priscilla in her smart sport 
clothes as the downtrodden damsel of the movies who 
has always been cast out in the snow with a baby in her 
arms — for publicity purposes. Two or three years ago 
Priscilla might have become very sentimental about her 
wedding ring. But now she giggled : "I hocked it. You 
bet. I needed the money a lot more than I did that solid 



44 



r vledding^l 



their 



Widows of Hollywood 
By Dorothy Manners 




gold reminder of a tinsel experience. 
Why shouldn't I have sold it? I paid for 
it in the first place. Not by any stretch of 
the imagination could my marriage be 
looked on as a sweet, romantic episode. It 
stood for everything miserable and unhappy 
in my life and nothing pleasant. If the 
marriage means nothing — why should the 
wedding ring?" That's one way of look- 
ing at it. 

I don't mean to change the moods too 
violently, but Claire Windsor was the next person of dis- 
carded wedding rings I met, and Claire gets us back to 
the lavender and old lace motif. Like Pauline Garon, the 
lovely Windsor still wears her wedding ring, but her rea- 
son is less sentimental. "I still wear it," admitted Claire, 
flashing the little platinum band in the sunlight to catch 
the sparkle of the diamonds. "It's a pretty one, don't 
you think? I love all pretty things." It's nice that Bert 
Lytell gave Claire such a pretty ring. Else it might not 
have remained among her souvenirs. 

Marian Nixon really didn't want to be quoted about 
what she did with the wedding ring Joe Benjamin gave 
her. Not that it has a lot of sentimental value, either. 
She looked very dainty and regretful when she said, 
"You know my marriage was so unsuccessful — the less 
said about it the better." She doesn't wear Joe's ring, 
that's a cinch. I looked on the right finger, and it wasn't 
there. I know Marian well enough, however, to have 
an idea that she has it put away. Maybe down in some 
bank vault along with her other legal difficulties is the 
platinum band given her by the boy who, for a while, was 
one of the country's most promising lightweight boxers. 



Beginning at the top and from 
left to right are Constance Tal- 
madge, Priscilla Bonner, Jac- 
queline Logan, Evelyn Brent 
and Marian Nixon 



Jackie Keeps No Reminders 

Jacqueline Logan, peppy and red-headed, didn't have 
. much luck in her matrimonial flyer with Ralph Gilles- 
pie. Like Marian. But unlike Marian, she doesn't mind 
telling the world about it in all of its disappointing 
phases. Marriage, in her case, was twice as expensive 
as it was sacred. As a husband, Mr. Gillespie was a great 
luxury. The girl has a lot of sweet memories — all of 
bills. In time she got rid of both her husband and her 
wedding ring. 

A young colored gentleman named Freddie is Jackie's 
chauffeur. Freddie was all set to get married, but he 
couldn't afford a pretty ring for his bride-to-be. That 
gave Jacqueline an idea. She said, "Here, Freddie, take 
this one," and handed him her own. "It's just as good as 
new and you can have the initials crossed out." 

And so, now, Mrs. Freddie wears Mr. Gillespie's 
(Continued on page 98) 

45 



r 



You Can Count 
Her Rights 



The survival of the fittest seems to be a theory 
that Clara Bow holds true. For such rings as 
you find about her are never just under the eyes ; 
she prefers the basketball to the highball, and to 
flex the knee rather than the merry elbow 




Tough 



on Clara to Exercise 
and Lefts 




Has there ever been any question of 
Clara's . manhandling ability? If 
so, here's evidence that she has at 
least one gentleman completely up 
in the air. Above, a demonstra- 
tion of how she straight-arms the 
over-ardent; and at the top, proof 
of her mental alertness — for it's 
clear nothing goes over her head but 
a basketball 




47 




48 



1/ 



Editor's Note: The high- 
light of the visit of the 
author of this article to 
Hollywood was his im- 
pression of an unknown 
extra girl whose first 
name he knows, whose 
last name he never found 
out, and whose telephone 
number he was too dazed 
to ask for. Can any fan 
supply the information? 




as Anybody 
Here Seen 





j 



By Carl Lewis 

TM," I said over the telephone from the hotel room 
in Los Angeles fifteen minutes after we arrived, 
"We are here." And then to make our plight 
certain, we added, "And we must have an extra 
girl to complete our party." 

Now Jim has lived in Los Angeles long enough to be- 
come a native son and he's absorbed so much of that mis- 
placed, far- Western, go-getter spirit that you just can't 
stump him on any sort of problem. He has ordered his 
life that way and the very rocks and rills and the count- 
less variety of flowers that bloom outside his bungalow 
door, all were brought from afar. And the bungalow 
itself — idyllic dream that it is — rests on the roof of his 
brand-new twelve-story building — right in the heart of 
busy Los Angeles. That's the kind of bachelor boy Jim 
ttfrned out to be. So when Jim said he would see what he 
could do at the dawning eleventh hour, we felt confident 



What Is the Last Name of 

the Extra Girl Whose Charm 

Outshines the Stars 

enough of the outcome to open wide the hotel room door 
so that there could be no possibility of our expected guest 
passing by without noting our eager faces and our un- 
mistakable New York manner. 

We must have bent too far over the cocktail mixer, or 
something else happened, but when we swung about to 
refill another round of outstretched glasses, here, right in 
our midst, was this child of twenty — maybe older, maybe 
younger — I never did think to ask her age. 

Smoke and Small Talk 

"I'm Connie, I don't drink but I will have a cigarette if 

■* you will be so kind" — all one introductory sentence* 

from the hazel eyes and black-haired young miss who 

was all engulfe*d in a fur-trimmed red coat and perfume. 

{Continued on page 93) 

49 



^ 




and Gro 




oung 



Kathleen Clifford Does — And She's as Fresh as the Dewiest Flowers in 

Any of Her Own Six Shops 



I 



By Oscar Dunning 



AM so pleased to 
have met you, Miss 
Clifford," I said, 
with an unwonted 
ring of genuineness in the 
words. 

"Are you really?" said 
Kathleen Clifford. 

It was the second tim 
in a week I had pra 
cally swooned away 
Metro-Goldwyn-Ma) 
studio after too sudde 
exposure to that rare 
symptom, a human-being 
complex in a star. The 
first time was when the 
beautiful Mrs. King Vi- 
dor had come up to me 
out of a clear sky, held out her 
hand, and • said: "My name's 
Boardman." The editorial side of 
me takes this opportunity to view 
with alarm such remarks, striking 
as they do at the finest old aristo- 
cratic traditions of .Hollywood. 
What can Mr. Metro and Mrs. 
Goldwyn be thinking of to allow a 
spirit like that to get around their 
Culver City joint? I mean, come 
now. 

'Are you really?" The question 
is asked in equally surprised tones by all 
and sundry who visit the "Excess Bag- 
gage" set and are informed in a piping 
treble by a slip of a blonde that they are 
confronting the original Kathleen Clifford. 
And their minds work like much lightning 
. . . why, let me see . . . can it be ten 
years ago I saw her in serials . . . come to 
think of it, how many years before that was 
it she was playing the London music-halls 
. . . well, Aunty Grace died in '10, and she 
used to say . . . well, now, isn't that the 
darnedest thing? 

You stand gaping before a fresh-looking 
young creature in pink-check rompers, her 
blonde curls tied with a big white bow. 
That is her costume in backstage sequences 
of "Excess Baggage." She looks — in the 
middle twenties with make-up hiding the 
clearness of her complexion ; hardly out of 
the 'teens when you meet her on the street. 
That is all except for her eyes, which have 
lived in Hollywood and watched the tragi- 
comic changing scene of the movies just 

50 




long enough to have ac- 
quired a suspicion of a 
cynical glaze. 

She Is Young Inside 

Che is only to be de- 
scribed as "cute." It 
is not the forced skittish- 
ness of those conscious of 
approaching middle-age 
that is hers. She effer- 
vesces like a bottle of gen- 
uine Pol Roger. There 
are springs of youth and 
irresponsibility deep 
down in her which she 
could not check, even if 
she would. Her favorite 
expression, evidently, is 
"this, that and the other." 
Her conversation is embroidered 
with up-to-the-minute slang 
which she pronounces as if she 
meant it. Her voice is alert and 
melodious. 

"Speaking from your experi- 
ence," I asked her, "would you 
prescribe a career in the movies 
for incipient crow's-feet, double 
chin, dizzy spells after lunch 
and other symptoms of Father 
Time's inroads?" 

"Absolutely," she gurgled, 
"Positively, and how, and so forth. Now 
the theater, mind you, in which I spent my 
early days, is the most aging thing in the 
world. You're up half the night, rehears- 
ing all day, traveling from place to place, 
without rest or peace. If you strike a suc- 
cess, you may get a few months' continuous 
work. Most of the time you're sick worry- 
ing about a new job. 

"But the movies are different. Once you 

get started in Hollywood there couldn't be a 

profession more calculated to ward off the 

ravages of time. You have your own home, 

you have regular hours, you get to bed— at 

least, you can if you want to — at a reason- 

ablestime. Nowadays most of the successful 

people are on contract and haven't even got 

ifoufse t0 worry about their job. God knows they 

Photos haven't anything else to worry about. Act- v 

ing for the movies probably requires less 

mental and physical effort than anything in 

the world. You stand up in front of the 

camera, the director tells you what to do 

{Continued on page 88) 




R. H. Louise 



Don Joan, the last name being Crawford. When she doffs her skirt, must she carry a quirt? Or 
is it merely a part of the Mexican make-up? We think the latter, because, with eyes and a smile 

like Joan's, a girl carries already weapons aplenty 



51 



i 




rass 



_^-^^^C" 



Will 



The Faster the Little Girls Work 
The Faster They Become Stars 




By Elizabeth Petersen 




S' 



USIE GLUMPZ 
is a striking ex- 
ample of that old 
adage, "Ask and you 
shall receive," and 
she hasn't stopped 
asking. There are 
some meanies who go 
so far as to call her 
a gold-digger, but 
Susie hasn't accepted 
anything under platinum yet. She left home at the age 
of sixteen with her mother's egg money tightly clasped in 
her hands and from then on she was known as April 
Morn, the name that has endeared her to her public. 
Poor April had a long, hard road of it. She hurried 
home from the notion counter every evening to her 
modest little apartment on Park Avenue, where she re- 
luctantly changed from her simple little working dress to 
gold lame and diamonds. No matter how tired she was 
from her arduous toil, she was never too tired to smile, 
to laugh and to dance; and if at these times she asked for 
little things, what gentleman could refuse such a deserv- 
ing girl? April's brave struggle to make good was the 
talk of the town. Then one day she met Mr. Blankberg of 
Hollywood and he said, "You have such wonderful eyes." 
Susie smiled coyly up at him. "You flatterer," she said 
brightly. 

A year later April Morn's 
name was up in electrics and 
her success is a beacon for 
other struggling girls. 

The Primro8ie Path 

Cver since she was just an 
itsy bitsy girl, Roughhouse 
Rosie, as she was affection- 
ately called by the gas house 
gang back home, was lucky. 
You never did see the beat of 
that girl's luck. It wasn't any- 
thing for her to bring home ten 
dollars a day before she was 
sixteen, and after that her find- 
ings increased proportionately. 

52 



So it wasn't any wonder that in a little while she began 
to find diamond bracelets, emerald necklaces, smart little 
Paris frocks and Rolls Royces in all sorts of crooks and 
crannies. "Look what I found today!" was invariably 
Rosie's exuberant greeting. And she'd clap her hands 
with delight as she showed off her little trinkets. "If she 
can find all this in Duluth, what wouldn't she find in 
New York?" her mother asked herself. So the whole 
family put together their savings and Rosie found a few 
hundred dollars or so in an ash can and they went to 
New York. Rosie's name was now Rose D' Amour and 
every morning she went out into the big city to find things 
to keep her little family snug and happy. One day she 
found Mr. Blankberg. "You have such wonderful eyes," 
he said. Rosie glanced up from lowered lids. "You flat- 
terer !" she said brightly. 

A year later Rosie's name was up in electrics and her 
luck stayed right with her. 

Gwen Dreams Come True 

Gwendolyn Schmaltz lived with her family over her 
VJ father's pickle factory and every afternoon when she 
came home from school she used to curl up in a big chair 
eating dill pickles and reading fairy tales. One day, 
as she Was reading all about Cinderella and Prince Charm- 
ing and the glass slipper, one 
of the dill pickles suddenly 
stirred and she gasped with 
surprise as it changed into a 
funny little man in a green 
suit. "You can make three 
wishes and they will come 
true," he told her. Gwen- 
dolyn made three wishes so 
fast you couldn't see their 
dust. "I want a fairy god- 
father, I want a trip to 
Europe, I want to be a movie 
star." N The little green man 
smiled and in a flash he was 
a pickle again. Gwenny 
picked it up and after exam- 
ining it carefully, popped it in- 
her mouth and ate it, vaguely 
-surprised that it didn't taste 
any different from the others. 




Illustrations 
By Eldon Kelley 




Shortly afterwards she meet the nice old gentleman who 
became her fairy godfather, and she could never under- 
stand what such a fine gentleman saw in a poor girl like 
herself who had no other riches than a rose-leaf skin, 
pearl-like teeth and golden curls. The Cinderella man 
took her to Europe to finish her education, and Gwenny 
almost finished him. She was now known as Gwendolyn 
Darling, "Because Daddy calls me that," she explained 
prettily to anyone who would listen, which wasn't many. 
Well, Gwenny had a fine time in Europe. She visited all 
over, did marquises in France and belted earls in Eng- 
land, and she soon lost count of the gondolas she swam 
home from in Venice. And strangely enough, it was in 
a gondola that she met Mr. Blankberg. "You have 
such wonderful eyes," he exclaimed. "You flatterer!" 
She sallied brightly, making no move to swim home. 

A year later Gwendolyn's name was up 

in electrics and she still believed in Santa 

Claus. 



Mr. Blankberg, the Tireless Altruist 

Driscilla Katzenstein attributes her 
success to hard work. "I was always 
a hard worker," she said in a recent inter- 
view, "and a fast one. There was never a 
task too arduous for me to attempt in my 
struggle for success." Priscilla is also a 
firm believer in the old axiom, early to bed 
and early to rise, and she always went to 
bed early in the morning and rose early in 
the afternoon. She read all the success 
magazines and worked as hard as anyone 
could doing nothing. But fame still hid 
around the corner refusing to be coaxed 
out and Priscilla began to get desperate. 
Then at last, just as she was beginning to 
give up her last little speck of hope, she 
met Mr. Blankberg and he said "You have 
such wonderful eyes." She forgot all the 
success books she had ever read and put 
everything she had into her voice as she 
whispered coyly, "You flatterer." 

A year later her new name, Priscilla 
Alden, was up in electrics and she was 
telling interviewers she owed her success 
to hard work. 



wept 



A Ladder of Bed- 
clothes 

T ong before May Day was 
" L * 1 a star, she was an inno- 
cent little girl in a convent. 
Day after day she sat at her 
window watching the world 
go by and sometimes she hid 
her face in her hands and 
"Just think of the joy I could bring 
to others if I were a motion picture 
star," she used to tell herself over 
and over again. "Oh, dear, I must 
go out in the world and bring hap- 
piness to others." So you can see 
for yourself that May was a very 
unselfish soul who only thought of 
others. One evening she made a 
rope of her bedclothes and climbed down 
to freedom, taking along only a few evening 
gowns, her sapphire and platinum bar pin 
and her diamond rings. The long and short 
of it was that she went to Hollywood and 
got a job as an extra. Girls who have been 
brought up in convents get jobs just like that in Holly- 
wood. Well, sir, she struggled and struggled and strug- 
gled, and after that she struggled and struggled and 
struggled some more and still she wasn't any nearer star- 
dom. Day after day she appeared on the set with her 
make-up put on as carefully as though she were on her 
way to a close-up, only to be lost in a mob scene again. 
One day she couldn't bear disappointing the world any 
longer and falling to her knees gave way to long, bitter 
sobs. Mr. Blankberg heard it far away in his private 
office and unable to resist a lady in distress, or — in any- 
thing else for that matter — went to her assistance. As 
May raised her deep fringed violet orbs to his, he whis- 
pered hoarsely, "You have such wonderful eyes." Her 
answer was silvery with tears, "You flatterer !" 

A year later May Day's name was up in electrics and 
she spoke tearfully of the days when she was an innocent 
little girl in a convent. 

But she says that she does not regret having suffered 
the hardships of her long struggle, for she is now in a 
position to bring into the lives of Her Public an itsy bitsy 
ray of sunshine. {Continued on page 97) 



53 




x 



of to the hoardmanner horn 






For off-stage characterization, 
Eleanor Boardman chooses to be 
one of those girU just too advanced 
for words — at least, for nice words. 
Shocking you with stories and 
theories, you know. But it doesn't 
get over, somehow. Underneath all 
of Eleanor's sophisticated cama- 
raderie is a vanilla ice cream soul 









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54 



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a 




of One 




And After Fifteen Years 
of It the Buoyant Mr. 
Mulhall Likes Movie 
Acting Better Than Ever 



I 



By Carolyn Dawson 



LIKE the movies. I like 
acting in 'em. It may seem 
funny for me to say a 
thing like that, for I've , 
been in pictures fifteen 
years, and when you've 
been in this game so long 
you're supposed to pre- 
tend that you're bored 
with Hollywood and 
the studios ; that you're 
fed up with every- 
thing; that success is 
hollow and money 
brings more unhappi- 
ness than pleasure. 

"But I don't feel that 
way, so why should I 
say it ? Why, in this 
business, you get a kick 
out of life every day. It's 
always changing, full of 
variety, colorful. There's a 
seventy-five cent word for 
you, colorful. As I was saying, 
you may be up one day and down the 
next — don't / know! — but just as likely, if you get any 
break at all, you'll be up again. It's a continuous change. 
You never know what's around the corner. 

"And there's always something to hand you a laugh. I 
like to laugh, kid around and have a good time. I like 
people and enjoy amusing them, whether I'm being paid 
for it or not. I never could act the way a movie star is 
popularly supposed to. 

"For instance, when strangers come on a set where I'm 
working. I don't need to tell you that there are a lot of 
stars in this business who refuse to meet visitors, on the 
set. Even have the set closed in if they see one of the 
studio boys coming along with a bunch of tourists in tow. 

"Perhaps I'd be a grand success if I acted tempera- 




June Estep 

mental and mysterious like that. I don't know. But I 
can't do it. 

"Now, I've found that most visitors on a set are a little 
bit nervous and embarrassed. Perhaps they've just been 
thrown off another set. You can't tell. So I go up to 
them and shake hands all around. I answer any questions 
they ask me, tell a joke or two, and in a few minutes 
we're all laughing, and friendly. Having a good time." 

Too Easy to Last 

"LJonestly, I don't do it to boost my stock with them, 

though it doesn't hurt an actor to have folks go 

away saying he's a regular person. But my real reason 

for being friendly with them is that I like people. I can 

{Continued on page 86) 



55 



c/amily 



Little Josie Keaton was as high-spirited 
as she was high-waisted. When the lads 
tried to spark with her, she had a way of 
putting her foot down. And when she 
did, something usually broke 



Private Lemuel Keaton always felt that 
he would have been another Ulysses S. 
Grant if he could have afforded cigars. 
The thing which determined this pose of 
Lem's is that he is hiding behind his back 
a hen that unwisely flew the coop 



Cousin Osmer Keaton, "The Centerville 

Flash," would have won the game for his 

team if he hadn't — with score tied at 87 

to 87 — tried to steal left field 




56 



i/ 




lbums 



The bigger bustle movement, inspired by 
herself, first brought Aunt Minnie Keaton 
into prominence. Spiteful belles of her 
era used to refer to Minnie as the county 
seat, and think they were funny 



Jethro Z. Keaton — called "Stovepipe 
Joe" behind his back — was a fur bear- 
ing fur baron and organized the Believers 
in Beaver campaign in the '80's. As 
an example to his followers, he grew his 
hat fibre 



f 




own 




"Racehorse" Ralph Keaton, pride of the 
county fair and the most dangerous man 
in buggy-riding, had quite a vivid career, 
but was finally locked up for wearing 
bad checks 






jo 



r 




v ' t 'Hi v y y ^ i nKM 'nw'ii^ m 



Uom'mel 



A banner attraction, indeed: Florence Vidor. But misleadingly gowned. Attired as if 
about to retire, she actually is to appear soon in the titular role of "The Magnificent Flirt" 



58 



OO Nice 




ove 



Florence Vidor Lives in a 

Manless World and Says 

She Likes It 

By Gladys Hall 



the 



ence ! 
His 



vicarious 



DURING the making of "The Patriot 
great German actor used daily to rap 
on Florence Vidor's dressing-room door 
and hail her forth with "My good Flor- 
intoned as only Tannings could intone it. 
good Florence would emerge and they 
would stroll on to the set, arm in arm, delighted 
with one another's company. 

When, in two or three of the sequences, Tan- 
nings was required to make crude love to Flor- 
ence Vidor, he felt constrained about it. He 
needn't have. He inferred that with some other 
woman he wouldn't mind. But with his good 
Florence ! His sensitiveness rebelled at the 
insult. It took the combined forces 

jd Florence herself to break down 
his nice inhibition. 

Also, for the love scenes he wanted to "dress up." 
Playing the part of a slobbering Czar, unkempt and un- 
couth, he shied away from handling his good Florence in 
so repugnant an attire. He did "dress up." They shot 
some scenes that way. The rushes were shown and 
Lubitsch foamed at the mouth, technically speaking. He 
said to Tannings, "You are no longer the Czar ! You are 
out of character. We must re-take." 

Jannings sorrowfully doffed his fastidious attire and 
slumped into dishabille. He had been wrong, and he 
admitted that he had been wrong. He went about saying 
of Lubitsch, "He iss right ! He iss right !" 

And he was consoled when his good Florence assured 
him that she only saw his soul and not the habiliments of 
the Rabelaisian Czar. 

His good Florence has "a terrible crush" on him, by her 
own admission. He is, she says, the supremely great 
artist of the screen. And making this picture with him 
has been the supremely great epoch of her own career. 
• Jannings is a mighty channel, kept clear, through which 
the mighty currents of his art course to perfection. He is 
a child. He is a Gargantuan worker. When he has done 
a scene, he shakes with exhaustion, not simulated. There 
is a force in him akin to the force that ran through the 
men of whom they say "There were giants in those days !" 

These are a few of the things his good Florence thinks 
of Jannings. 




imam Jfowell is just what experiertr^-has 
" C"" ~~ Hom,. 



She says that her work in "The Patriot" has changed 
her. 

Probably it has. Every authentic experience re-molds 
every sensitized individual. But more than "The Patriot" 
and the co-working with Jannings has changed Florence 
Vidor. Life has had a hand. . . . 

When They Were Very Young 

Come years ago two youngsters, Florence and King 
Vidor, newly wed, rattled into Hollywood in a tin- 
pan car. They had "come West" from Texas to make 
their everlasting fortunes. They were young, courageous 
and in love. They worked hand in hand and their hearth- 
stone was considered unassailable. 

They progressed, Florence a bit the faster of the two. 
Then the small Suzanne was born. Florence Vidor says, 
today, that she was happier at that time than she has ever 
been before or since. She was fulfilling her destiny as a 
woman. And that is the basic commentary on Florence 
Vidor. Before she is anything else she is a woman, 
feminine species. The eager girl from small-town Texas, 
overlaid now with the light hand of sophistication and 
the heavier hand of experience, still reverts in her heart 
to an ideal of life wrenched from the flesh of the earth 
and the flesh of humanity. Other things — yes, there are 
other things. Important other things. Thrilling other 
things. But — they are substitutes. 

After Suzanne was born, Florence Vidor "retired" from 
(Continued on page 84) 



59 



r 



\, 




CERTAIN YOUNG MAN 



'T'HE less said about this the better. It's a picture made two 
years ago in a moment of poor judgment, and it's been 
on the shelf all this time, waiting for someone to get up the 
courage to bring it to light. The pity is that anyone ever did. 
All who like Ramon Novarro are advised to stay away, to 
avoid feeling unduly indignant about the stories handed out to 
Ramon. He should be romantic and intense and sincere — but 
never the dashing, cynical Beau Brnmmel. The story is about 
a blase young man who is pursued relentlessly by his cast-off 
ladies. On a fishing trip he meets another pretty girl. But this 
one is the wholesome type, and in a gesture of renunciation he 

»y his monocle, and asks her 



,.d"rrr~rnn 



iad in this if 



^ou're an easy giggler, and Mapetsfine Day looks yi&iq-. 



THE COP 



JT'S the open season for crook plays, without a doubt. This 
one is better than most. It all comes about because 
William Boyd befriends a wounded crook, who promptly runs 
off with his money and overcoat. Bill can hardly wait to get 
on the police force after that, and how he finally gets his man 
is worked out in a way that can't fail to interest you. There's 
humor in this, and lots of atmosphere, and one of those care- 
fully planned robberies that make you sick with nervousness 
for fear everything isn't going off as the master mind expected. 
This master mind is played exceptionally well by Robert Arm- 
strong. And Bill Boyd is awfully cute as the new, and dumb, 
cop. Alan Hale, Dan Wolheim, and Jacqueline Logan are also 
in the cast, and they all looked pretty good to me. You can 
-'Si&t'fj J v?5 this one. 





THE BIG KILLING 

A NOTHER comedy featuring those two incorrigibles, 
Wallace Beery and Raymond Hatton. The best part of 
the picture is the mountaineer sequence, before the so-called 
laughs begin. The story is of a couple of families in the Ozark 
mountains who long to wipe each other out, chiefly because 
the daughter of one house and the son of the other are in love. 
The boy's family is hopelessly outnumbered, so they hire a 
couple of sharpshooters from the county fair, to come out 
and practise on the enemy. You can imagine what a help our 
comic boy-friends would be. Through no fault of theirs the 
war is finally ended and Love is triumphant. This has a very 
swell cast, including Lane Chandler, Gardner James, and Paul 
McAllister. Mary Brian is the girl, and she's improving. A 
ray of hope comes with the rumor that producers are beginning 
to think comedy teams are a mistake. 

60 



LILAC TIME 

yHE romance of a little French girl and one of the seven 
aviators billeted at her house during the war. It has a nice 
atmosphere, and a simple story. He goes off to battle and 
escapes death by a miracle, she is driven from her home, and 
finally, after much despair and suffering, they find each other 
again. Colleen Moore as a French peasant girl is not con- 
vincing, but she's cute. There is some excellent comedy, and 
this is what Colleen knows how to do. She falls down in the 
love scenes, which might have been very very romantic. But 
her fans won't mind. The picture is made interesting by some 
beautiful and exciting shots of an air battle, and other aero- 
nautical feats. It is reminiscent of "The Legion of the Con- 
demned," though not so well handled. Gary Cooper plays in 
his usual stern, unbending manner. I kept thinking what a 
lovely romance this might have been, in other hands. 




WARMING UP 

DICHARD DIX'S baseball film follows the formula for 
sporting pictures. A rube pitcher wanders in .from the 
country and just naturally excels all the men in the Big 
Leagues. But one great big bully of a batter on the opposing 
team gets his number, and Richard can't do a thing with him. 
He finally works off this complex, during the last minutes of 
the Big Game. Anyone who is unable to palpitate over curves 
and strikes and innings will find the surrounding story rather 
slim. It's one of those pictures in which the aristocratic young 
heroine dresses up as the kitchen maid to make her beau feel 
at ease. This little snob is played nicely by Jean Arthur, who 
looks like an animated Mary Brian. Baseball and Richard Dix 
meaning what they do to the American people, this ought to be 
thoroughly satisfactory to most of you. It's clean. 




THE DRAG NET 

I7VELYN BRENT and George Bancroft do their stuff in 
*- J one more attempt to duplicate the success of - "Under- 
world.' This is the slowest moving crook drama on record. 
There's a very good story concealed here somewhere, but it 
gets so entangled in festoons of confetti and other strange 
forms of what we may as well call symbolism, that nothing 
much comes of it. The grouping and lighting are often beauti- 
ful and much more dramatic than the action. But there are 
some grand moments. It's about a policeman who goes all to 
pieces when he's tricked into thinking he has killed his pal. It 
would be more convincing if we were let in on some of the steps 
in his degeneration. Evelyn Brent hasn't much to do but look 
disgusted. And William Powell is just what experience has 
xpect. So is George Bancroft. 



taught yout 




DETECTIVES 

£EORGE K. ARTHUR and Karl Dane are back again. 
Karl is house detective in a hotel, and George, a bell-boy, 
is one of those amateur sleuths who know so much more about 
crime than any mere professional can ever hope to. Marceline 
Day, as the girl they both hanker after, has nothing to do but 
look pretty and a bit terrified. They all get involved with a 
strange hypnotic thief who carries them away in caskets. Then 
it turns into one of those typical spooky comedies that take 
place in a deserted house, with the usual sheets, shadows, and 
banging doors to chill you while you laugh. It's reasonably 
amusing. And for the benefit of those who can't resist a 
female impersonation, George K. Arthur does a very funny one. 
He's just too dainty for words in his chambermaid costume. In 
fact, George is head man in this picture, but that shouldn't 
trouble Karl Dane, after his triumph in "The Trail of '98." 



THE STREET OF SIN 

THHIS picture is both sordid and arty — than which there is no 
more distressing combination. It is stark realism in a. 
Caligari setting. And it is most unpalatable. The story is of 
the Big Boss of this squalid street — a tremendous, cruel, dis- 
reputable fellow — and his experiences with a Salvation Army 
lassie. The effect of Fay Wray's smile under the poke bonnet 
is almost instantaneous, and a few hours after they meet, the 
erstwhile criminal is seen bathing babies in the Army Shelter. 
The idea is that love and purity can redeem the worst of men, 
and he finds greatness in dying to save the now nicely scrubbed 
babies. There are many disappointments in this picture. But 
the greatest is Emil Tannings. He does not seem to have risen 
above its mediocrity. I don't know exactly how anyone could 
bring magnificence to such a part, but I thought Jannings 
would have some magic to invest it with. 

61 



r 



m*mmmmmmm* 



\ 



\ 



^ 



Current Pictures 




THE FIFTY-FIFTY GIRL 

\/0U will like Bebe Daniels' new picture. It is lively and 
funny, and particularly becoming to Bebe. As the title 
suggests, she is one of those independent gals, who contend 
that a man can't do anything she couldn't do. She even gets 
into a fierce argument about it with a strange young man on 
the train, and tells him she'll never have to depend on any man 
for protection. Imagine her embarrassment when she finds 
she's inherited one-half of a coal mine, and this same young 
man has inherited the other half. They go out to dig for coal 
together, and he does the woman's work and she does the 
man's — that is, until she gets too scared by various evil 
goings-on about the place to do much but try to stop her teeth 
from chattering. This should be very satisfactory to all 
gentlemen, as they win a complete moral victory in the end. 
Meanwhile, there are a lot of laughs, Bebe wears some nifty 
clothes, and the proceedings are helped on by the pleasant 
idiocies of William Austin. James Hall, he of the very blue 
eyes, is the boy who proves the supremacy of the male. 




NO QUESTIONS ASKED 

/T'S gotten so that yells of joy go up from the audience 
when Buster Collier appears, so Warner Brothers have put 
him in a fairly amusing comedy about some newlyweds. Tbese 
children have been turtle doves for almost a year, and their 
granddad is going to give them a handsome sum of money if 
they complete a year of married life with no quarrels. Other- 
wise, it goes to an unwedded and very covetous cousin. This 
disagreeable fellow looks about for some experienced home- 
wrecker to tempt his cousin. And Margaret Livingston, with 
her years of practise, gets the job. Margaret gives an exhibi- 
tion of non-stop vamping that would cause any man to haul off 
and give her a good sock. That's what she gets in the end, 
and the children get the .cheque. Most of this is fairly enter- 
taining, and to silence any complaints there are reels of Andre 
de Beranger swooning over various exotic and exquisite per- 
fumes more ecstatically than he has ever swooned before. 
Audrey Ferris is most attractive, but they had better put a 
weight clause in her contract before things go too far. 




THE MAGNIFICENT FLIRT 

yHIS is a story of the Lavernes — mother and daughter — 
and the moral is, Don't let mother stay out all night, or 
you'll never get a husband. Men are still old-fashioned. 
Loretta Young, very delicate and sweet, plays a good little 
daughter who goes to bed when her mother is just getting up 
for the night. She loves the nephew of the man her mother 
has a more experienced eye on, but neither can make any head- 
way until mama traps her man into matrimony, thus con- 
vincing him that she's not a notorious woman after all. Is 
that perfectly clear? This is supposed to be a smart, subtle, 
sophisticated, and Menjouian French comedy, but it doesn't 
quite come off. True, Albert Vino imitates Menjou con- 
scientiously, though he hasn't Menjou's charm. And Florence 
Vidor is seen in the bath-tub. And there are lots of hints, 
plants, paradoxes, and other "touches" dear to the director's 
heart. But there is such a display of modern interior deco- 
rating and prismatic photography that you can hardly keep your 
mind on the story. I deplore all these kaleidoscopic shots, this 
dizzy, fading, trick photography, when there's no possible 
necessity for it. It distracts the mind and strains the eyes. 




HIS TIGER LADY 

Pj/HOEVER thought of dressing Adolphe Menjou up in a 
Maharajah's turban and having him wear the same ex- 
pression for five or six reels, must have had a grudge against 
our Adolphe. None of the genial little subtleties for which he 
is so justly famous have a chance against these odds. It is a 
slightly idiotic story anyway, about a feline sort of Duchess 
very sinuously played by Miss Evelyn Brent. 

Adolphe, who is just a poor super of the Gaiety, loves this 
unattainable lady. So he dons his stage costume and mas- 
querades as a Hindu in order to get an introduction— since 
Hindus are accepted everywhere with nothing but their 
turbans as credentials. The Duchess' caprice is throwing her 
gloves into a tiger's cage and asking her current lover to go in 
and get them for her. For this rite Adolphe puts on a lion- 
tamer s costume, but that's not much more successful than the 

^ , u Wlt S a [ ace , J that de P ends so much on its expression, 
Adolphe really should not go in for these impassive roles 
They cramp his style and do him a genuine injustice.' 
f. b.— He got the gloves— but the tiger had died during the 



62 



In Review 




FORBIDDEN HOURS 

'T'HIS is a sort of reversal of "The Prisoner of Zenda," with 
the sacrifice ending omitted. Ramon Novarro is a young 
king — mythical, of course — who meets, woos, and loves (after 
a struggle with his baser self) a young girl from Paris. She 
is no less a person than the niece of Ramon's Prime Minister, 
but still not of the blood royal. Now that I think of it, this 
is exactly the same story as "The Yellow Lily," only instead 
of being put in jail, the girl is handed over to a group of 
drunken officers and humiliated in the back room. Renee 
Adoree plays this girl with her usual sincerity and charm. 
But even though it was a mythical kingdom, I don't see why 
she had to be garbed in clothes so utterly incredible, and so 
hopelessly unbecoming. Ramon is nearer his old self than he 
has been for some time. Harry Beaumont, the director, has 
great talent for making actors behave in a way you recognize 
as absolutely real. Even in its rather idiotic background, he 
made the big love scene seem so true and natural that for a 
moment it almost became a big romantic picture. 




THE YELLOW LILY 

"T'HIS is another of those archduke-and-commoner atfairs, in 
which Billie Dove plays an innocent girl, and Cllve Brook 
is a royal prince who means harm. Billie is the sister of the 
village doctor — a terrifying fellow with moustachios. She 
meets the prince — or is it the Duke — at a ball, and falls in love 
with him at once. But she knows dishonorable intentions when 
she sees them, and the Duke has to resort to very elaborate 
strategy to get into her bedroom. Then there's a struggle, and 
before Billie knows it, what with one thing and another, she 
has landed in jail. Of course, he doesn't leave her there. He 
gives up kingdom, uniform, everything, for her in the end. 
Billie looks lovely, especially in her nightie. Clive Brook is 
very intense, but he's hardly the mythical kingdom type. The 
photography and settings are handsome, and the story moves 
along fluently and pleasantly. But in spite of all these virtues 
there's nothing very intriguing about it. It simply won't cause 
you any pain. Taken all in all, it's about as natural and 
exciting as a picture as its title is as a flower. 




DON'T MARRY 

J NEVER expected to shriek with laughter over the antics 
of Lois Moran and Neil Hamilton — of all people ! — but 
that's what happened when I saw "Don't Marry." Lois has 
developed an unexpected sense of comedy, and the picture is 
just a good old-fashioned yell. Nothing intricate or subtle 
about this. It's awfully silly — about a serious-minded young 
man who disapproves of all but serious-minded young ladies 
with ruffles and blushes. An ultra-modern flapper resents his 
attitude. She needs a temporary husband — just to help her 
escape from an unhappy home. So she decides to kill two birds 
with one stone and marry the poor fellow to teach him a 
lesson. From then on there are views of Lois getting in and 
out of the most excruciating rigs — old-fashioned nightgowns, 
bathing suits, and what not. You can imagine the results. One 
look at that bathing suit, and Neil realizes there is something 
to be said for the modern girl. Then there are more and more 
situations and louder and louder shrieks from the audience. 
It would be a sad mistake not to go to this. So loud and long 
were the guffaws that I feel safe in recommending it to 
everyone. 




TELLING THE WORLD 

'T'HEY have given Billy Haines a new story, thank goodness. 
That other one was good, but it was better the first time. 
Bill has kept his old personality, however, and that guarantees 
everybody a good time. He continues to defy all the rules for 
heroes and get away with it. He is incorrigibly selfish. He 
swipes his girl's lamb chops and gives her the bone. He sleeps 
sumptuously on the only sofa while she gets rheumatism on 
the floor. He hides behind people when there's any shooting. 
He does everything an upstanding young man ought not to do. 
And the women adore him. This picture has the usual wise- 
cracks and Billy's special brand of clowning, and a nice love 
story too. It's about a rich young newspaper reporter who 
falls in love, too late, with a girl who has taken her broken 
heart to China. He follows her, and from then on the story 
gets wildly melodramatic, with murders, executions, airplanes, 
and the U. S. Navy to the rescue. But it's a lot of fun. A 
young and amiable girl named Anita Page makes a very 
promising debut, with pretty close-ups and some good acting. 
This is fine entertainment for those who like William Haines. 
And who doesn't? 



63 



w 



/ 




the 



Fifth Avenue 



When Marceline Day visited New York recently, she 
did quite a bit of shopping and agreed to pose for these 
photographs so that our readers could see some of the 
pretty things she bought. Above, she is showing you 
a negligee that is really a hostess gown of flesh-colored 
chiffon with cream lace and a striped flannel bathing 
suit ensemble with a plain jersey jumper. Note the 
smart flannel penguin bathing bag. Left, a chic 
futuristic satin pajama suit in black and white with 
blue checked effect 



64 




JDay Lon 



Wraps Up Mar cell tie 



And here are a few more of the pretties Marcehne 
brought back to Hollywood with her. Above a 
swagger waistcoat, cut on mannish lines, tops this 
pajama suit of silvercloth worn with a three-quarters 
length white velvet coat. The little velvet house coat 
with the cape effect she is gathering around her is the 
"very last word" and is worn over a cream lace slip. 
To the right, fastened at the waist with a large bow 
of coral satin ribbon is another negligee of lacy 
ruffles and frills 



■■ 



N 







alories Don't Count with \^arnilla 

The Only Thing About Her That's Not Slender 

Is Her Appetite 




IAT ladies and movie stars 

had better not read this. It's 

too discouraging. There's 

not a diet hint in the whole essay. For when Camilla 
Horn, the German girl friend of United Artists, sits down 
to a meal she means it. 

A couple of days after she landed in Hollywood I met 
Camilla. She knew two phrases in English. One of them 
was "I ham hungry" — and she didn't mean lamb chops 
and pineapple, either. This little girl has an old-fashioned 
appetite, and doesn't care who knows it. If you have one 
of those nice, thin, wiry fingers like Camilla's — she's got 
a couple of ideas about good things to eat. If you were 
lucky enough to lunch with Camilla, she might serve you : 
Fruit Cocktail : Slice the fruit of pineapple, oranges, 
grapes, pears and apples into tiny dices. Sweeten with 
sugar and moisten with natural juices. Serve cold in 
glass compote. 

Shad Roe : The safest way to cook shad roe is to parboil 
it first in acidulated water. Then boil it, bake it, or fry it, 
as preferred. If you cook it without this preliminary 
parboiling, it is liable to split, splutter and splash and there 
will be more shad roe out of the pan than in it. 

66 



By Betty Standish 



Add a teaspoonful of salt and 
a tablespoon ful of vinegar to a 
quart of boiling water. Boil the 
roe for fifteen minutes. Remove from the fire and place 
on the broiling rack two inches from the flame, cover with 
strips of bacon and broil for ten minutes on each side. 
There is nothing particularly fattening about shad roe — 
except the bacon — but with au gratin potatoes it's 
different. 

Au Gratin Potatoes : Peel, and cube or slice, uncooked 
potatoes. Fill baking dish with potatoes and moisten with 
sweet milk. Season with salt and pepper and sprinkle over 
with cheese. This should be served in baking dish — 
steaming hot. 

Green Peas : Should be cooked rapidly, until done, in 
salted water. To preserve greenness and freshness of 
peas, drop them in water after it has come to a boil. Serve 
with butter. 

Stuffed Celery: Mix roquefort cheese and Worcester- 
shire sauce (or plain cream will do) until it forms a 
soft paste. Chopped nuts or pimento may be added 
if preferred. Stuff center of celery with this cheese paste 
and serve cold. 




Knows 



rchids 



Jane Winton Scored on 

a Triple Play: Philly to 

Follies to Films 

By NANCY PRYOR 



JANE WINTON is the kind of 
girl who makes prosperous 
gentlemen wish they hadn't 
married so young in life. 
Even their wives would like 
her. So you can imagine what 
a slick sense of humor she has. 
Also, she has green eyes. And 
white skin. And an elegant and 
slightly voluptuous figure. 
Every week she draws a pleas- 
ant sum for lending the necessary 
touch of sophistication to the 
films made by Marion Davies, 
Jesse Lasky and William Fox 
When they need some one smart 
and a little worldly, they let Jane do 
it. The little girl know T s her orchids ! 
All she needs to do is be herself 
Nature did a neat job on Jane, but 
Fate and Experience really turned the trick 
and put her over. 

You get the idea that she has lived largely FreuI 

and rather thoroughly. Jane's green eyes can widen, 
with child-like amazement at the events of the world, but 
they can also narrow to an almost Oriental scrutiny if the 
occasion demands. Her mouth is pouting and full, but 
the words she speaks are Broadway. Venus herself had 
nothing on Jane for proportions, but she lets the French 
designers do her spring and fall silhouettes. In her off- 
stage moments she is happily and quite domestically mar- 
ried to Charles Kenyon, the playwright, but you can't lose 
the idea that Jane is perfectly capable of taking care of 
herself in the world and meeting any given situation with 
poise and gentle laughter. 

One day, as she sat on top of a trunk, she told me she 
had had to laugh off quite a few situations. She admits 
she knows her corsages, but even so, her life hasn't been an 
entire bed of roses. It was just a couple of days before 
she left for New York on her way to Enrope and she was 
perched up on her luggage trying to jam in a few extra 
bottles of French perfume and sheer, black lingerie things. 




A Fugitive From Philly 

:c Another girl and myself ran away 
■**■ from our homes in Philadelphia 
when I was sixteen," she began, brushing 
back a heavy wave of hair that had slipped 
over one eye. "She ran away 'because she 
thought it would be fun, and I went with her 
because I wanted to go on the stage." 
She went on to say that her father and mother had died 
when she was a very little girl and her guardian had 
rather severe ideas of how a young lady should conduct 
herself. She was never allowed to attend the theater or 
read the new novels or patronize the tea dances. Now 
and then she was escorted to one of the more conserva- 
tive hotels for Sunday dinner, and that about concluded 
her social activities for the week. When she was fifteen 
.years old, a daring aunt of hers sneaked her to a perform- 
ance of "Maytime," and that was the beginning and the 
end of lovely things so far as Jane was concerned. The 
dances and songs and pretty tunes made her almost drunk 
with happiness. She loved every bit of it. She figured 
that if she managed to get away she might bring this 
color and gaiety into her own life. And so she ran away. 
"Maybe if we had known how many meals we were 
going to miss and how badly things were going to turn 
out for us, we would never have left," Jane mused, reach- 
(Contiimcd on page 105) 

67 




'*w- 7 



w^'riir* 



"If^v 




Where a good maritime is had by all: the beach bungalows of Fred Beetson 
(farthest left), Raoul Walsh, Herbert Brenon and Allan Dwan 




M 



ALIBU BEACH — the movie stars' paradise! 
Here the pampered darlings of the screen with 
money enough to indulge every whim, enjoy the 
greatest luxuries they can find, escape from their 
own fame, freedom from their marble villas and imported 
limousines and high-salaried servants, the privilege of 
wearing old clothes and going unshaven and unmarceled. 

Along the California coast are scattered board shanties. 
Their squatter-inmates look out enviously on the stream 
of glittering automobiles that roll past their doors and 
mutter, "If I had their money I'd enjoy myself too." 

And the movie stars, with money enough to do what 
they wish, find nothing more desirable to buy than a bare 
board shanty on a stretch of California beach where they 
can do their own bousework ! 

Malibu Beach! "I simply had to have some place," the 
star with the famous eyes tells you tragically, "where I 
can get away from all this." Her gesture indicates the 
studio lot beyond the dressing-room door. "A place," 
she adds, "where I can forget my work." 

On week-ends you will find the star with the famous 
eyes at Malibu, with exactly the same crowd she sees 
every day at the studio, sitting about on the sands talking 
of the pictures they have just made, or are making or 



are going to make ! 



A year ago this spot, where fifty motion picture players 
have built cottages, was a strip of desolate beach walled 




ugitives 

At Malibu Beach the Stars Entrench to 

off from the world by rugged California hills at the back, 
and rocky promontories on either end. Twelve months 
ago this sandy shore, fourteen miles north of Santa 
Monica, echoed to the stamp of great cattle-herds. Today 
the million-dollar feet of movie stars leave the print on 
the same golden sands. For it is on the old herding 
grounds of the Malibu Ranch that the film millionaires 
have established the most exclusive colony in the world. 

A Community of Communicants 

Anna O. Nilsson started it all off when she built a 
** two-thousand-dollar cottage on the lonesomest strip 
of shore she could find. It was Anna's idea that she 
would be able to slip away week-ends to this cottage and 
commune with nature. But, being the most hospitable 
soul in the world, Anna invited her friends out to com- 
mune with her, and since Anna's friends consist of the 
entire population of Hollywood, Malibu Beach was not 
lonesome any longer. 

Simplicity and isolation do not come cheap. The enter- 
prising owners of the beach refused to sell lots to .the 
clamoring picture people. Instead they leased them for 
a period of ten years at a monthly rental which is no- 
body's business. By the time the public had awakened to 
the enterprise, every square foot of the beach was taken. 

Seated is George O'Brien; then come Ronald Colman, Louise 

Fazenda, Pauline Starke, Anna Q. Nilsson, Jane Winton and 

Myrna Loy 




68 




S Anf 



At the left, Herbert Brenon and Allan Dwan playing tennis; Phyllis Haver 
and Marie Prevost, Louise Fazenda ; the Ernest Torrences and Clive 
Brooks; Nils Asther, Loretta Young, Brenon and Lon Chaney ; and 

Karl Dane 




from 




ame 



Protect Their Privacy — By Rilla Page Palmborg 



Today picture players who heard about Malibu too 
late, and outsiders anxious to rub elbows with the stars, 
are clamoring for lots. But there is none to be had. It 
is rumored that fabulous sums have been offered for 
transfers of leases. But if transfers are ever made, there 
is an unwritten law that they must go to someone in the 
profession. 

With a private road running into this secluded domain 
and with a watchman patroling both beach and road, the 
most persistent movie fan hasn't a chance for a look-in. 
At last the stars have found a spot where they can play 
without the world looking on. 

The cottages with the ocean almost in the front yard 
are of all types, from simple little four-room shacks to 
elaborate two-story dwellings. Malibu Beach is one 
place in the world where the size and pretentiousness of a 
dwelling make not the slightest difference in the owner's 
popularity or social standing. Here money, pose and pre- 
tense are forgotten. 

Any old kind of clothes is worn, one-piece bathing suits 
being the favorite. Lilyan Tashman, for instance, prefers 
rather dressy bright-red pajamas, while Ronald Colman 
chooses baggy duck trousers and an old pull-on sweater. 
Famous marceled bobs are allowed to lose their curl, 
while the screen's most romantic lovers forget to shave. 
And gentlemen of the movies celebrated for the immaculate 
correctness of their attire, dress for dinner in a bathing suit. 



Negligees Aplenty 



TTospitality and open house are in the air. "Come on 
* * in and have a sandwich and a glass of something cool 
to drink," shouts Marie Prevost as she espies you passing 
her door. Marie has a closet filled with bathing suits and 
negligees of all sizes ready for visiting friends. "Come 
over to my clam-bake tonight," invites Louise Fazenda 
as you stop to watch her taking her exercises on the sand. 

The public, barred from this colorful spot, whispers all 
sorts of gossip about the goings-on of this new colony. 
But the movie players, used to all kinds of reports, pay 
not the slightest attention. 

If Mr. and Mrs. Grundy from Podunk should break 
through the patrol and happen to see the fair Gilda Gray 
originating a new dance on the beach in front of her 
house, they would probably rush out to tell the world that 
half-naked girls were dancing on the sand. They couldn't 
be convinced that this was a part of Gilda's daily routine. 
No doubt the sight of Marie Prevost and Phyllis Haver 
playing leap-frog on the water's edge would give rise to 
many a whispered story. Is it any wonder that the 
picture folk want a secluded spot ? 

Neil Hamilton owns the only sailboat in the colony and 
there is real excitement when it comes rolling in on the 
crest of a big wave. One day when I was down there, 
(Continued on page 122) 



The larger of the two small ladies at the left is Clive Brook's 

daughter; then Pauline Starke, Charles Farrell, Marie Prevost and 

Phyllis Haver 






69 





Within this, Mary Brian seems always to dwell, regardless of the 

part she plays. Whether she be gowned in the vestments of a nun, 

or togged out smartly for tennis, there is ever about her a bright 

radiance of youth, a gloriously eager tenderness 



The Vale of Innocence 



Richee 



70 



{fitter Qif/s 



to 




wallow 



Between Panhandlers and Panners 
James Hall Has Found Life in 
. Hollywood Is No Story-Book 

By Gladys Hall 



YOU pay Hollywood for what it gives you. 
You pay — and you pay until it hurts. 
Make no mistake about that. 

Sometimes Hollywood appears to single 
out a favorite son or a favorite daughter. To these 
rare ones she seems to give lib- 
erally, without stint. Like a 
painted, pampering old harridan 
of a mother, she bestows luxury- 
lollipops and lines the toboggan 
with velvet and oil of orchids. 

Sometimes Hollywood is nig- 
gardly. She defers payment. 
She evades. She vouchsafes a 
little nibble, then pulls it away 
again. She starves and forces 
knees to bend and hands to sup- 
plicate. 

But she always presents a bill. 

She has presented a bill to 
James Hall. And the coin he 
pays is bitter coin minted in 
heartache. 

It was so easy in the begin- 
ning. It showed such a favoring 
face. He thought "Heck, there 
isn't any cloud, there is only the 
silver lining !" 

Let's turn back the calendar. 

Jim was "born in the theater." 
When he was knee-high to Eve's 
grasshopper, he played in vaude- 
ville with his folks. He. was a 
bell-hop. When he grew too big 

to be a cunning bell-hop, he passed the role on to his sister, 
and he himself passed on to Broadway. 

He has gentle gray eyes and a frank, laughing mouth. 
Broadway liked him a lot. He danced and sang in "The 
Matinee Girl," "Merry, Merry" and others. He fell in 
love. First love. It was sweet, and he believed in it and 
in people and in life and everything. It's anticipating my 
story, but he doesn't now — not any more. 

One day an emissary from Flo Ziegfeld came to call. 
He suggested to young James Hamilton — for such was 




the name he used then — that he 
remain in New York for the 
summer in order to go into re- 
hearsal for the Follies in July. 
Mr. Ziegfeld liked his face. 

Jim had never summered in 
New York. The idea didn't 
appeal. He said so. The Zieg- 
feld emissary searched about 
for bait. He said, "What if I 
get you in the movies ? You're 
just the type. Scads of money. 
If that could be arranged, 
would you stay over?" 
Jim said tish or tosh or something. The Z. E. pre- 
sented the unbeliever with a letter to Walter Wanger of 
Famous Players. Jim put it in his pocket along with 
the letters he had forgotten to mail for his girl and other 
innocents. And he forgot it, too. Movies — money — apple 
butter! These things never happen to a "young man try- 
ing to get along on Broadway. 

A few weeks or months later Jim and a pal were out 
strolling. They had nothing in particular to do. The 
(Continued on page 116) 

71 



Paris: Cherbourg, 10:46 

A Boat-Train Interview with Lili Damita, 
Samuel Goldwyn's Newest Gift to American Fans 



By Lars Moen 



M 




Paris 
ONDAY: Read to 
day in L'Intran that 
Samuel Goldwyn 
has signed Lili 
Damita to go to America 
as Ronald Colman's new 
partner. What luck for 
Samuel Goldwyn! And 
what luck for the 
American public, even 
though it isn't yet 
aware of it ! Must 
see her at once and 
get an interview off 
to Motion Picture 
Magazine. 

TUESDAY: Went 
to United Artists to- 
day. She is in Paris. 
What luck for me! 
But the manager was 
out, and I couldn't learn 
her address. What to 
do? What to do? 

WEDNESDAY: Went 
to United Artists again. 
Learned that she is sailin 
Saturday on the Bcrcngai 
Will have to work fast. ]\ 
ager out again. And here 
Wednesday ! 

THURSDAY: At last! I have an 
appointment for tomorrow with her! 

FRIDAY: 3:15: Arrived for the ap- 
pointment. She has not yet arrived. 
And she sails tomorrow ! 3 :30 : Gloom 
hangs thick over the camp. She just 
telephoned that she can't come. Some- 
thing about gowns. Again what to do? 
3 :45 : We telephoned again, begging for an appointment 
later in the day. Not a chance ! She'll be busy every 
minute until time to leave. Perhaps I can see her at the 
boat train tomorrow morning. 

Four O'Clock and All's Wet 

Later : 4 :00 : Not much chance at the train tomorrow. 
There will be friends down to see her off, and the usual 
crowd and bustle at the station. We'll have to find a 
better idea — but what? 4:10: At last the old bean is 
working ! Perhaps we can ride to Cherbourg in the 
boat train tomorrow. That would give us more than six 
hours to interview her, write the story ; and post it by 
the same boat. 4:20: Mile. Damita is out. And now 
what are we going to do? The boat train will be in two 
sections; which will she be in? 4:35: Just telephoned 
again. Slill out. The gloom thickens by the minute. 



Manuel Freres 

Beauty and a proven ability to act 

brought Lili Damita her Goldwyn 

opportunity to accede to the throne 

of Vilma Banky 



5 :02 : Success ! She'll be in Car C. 
compartment 4. Xow to race oil 
and try to get a ticket for that 
train, in the same car if pos- 
sible. Luckily, we know a 
man who has a friend 
whose cousin lives in the 
same house with a man 
who has some pull with 
the railroad. Xow to 
see him. 5:47: What 
luck ! The celluloid 
gods of fortune are 
with us. In our pocket 
is a slip of paper read- 
ing : "Monsieur Moen 
is authorized to take 
the Train Transatlan- 
tique connecting with 
the R. M. S. Beren- 
garia." And our ticket 
reads Car C, compart- 
ment 4 ! 

SATURDAY: And 
here we are, riding across 
Normandy toward Cher- 
bourg. Just a few cars 
back is Will Hays, return- 
ing to America, now that 
some of the difficulties in the 
French situation are adjusted. 
Across from us sits Europe's 
loveliest screen star, soon to be 
American by adoption. She is avidly 
reading an Arscne Lupin novel which 
we brought to read on the trip back to 
Paris, while we sit, our portable on 
lap, tapping this out. 

At 10:45; one minute before the 
train pulled out, we were the sole occu- 
pant of the compartment. No sign of 
Mile. Damita. Had we misunderstood 
over the telephone the number of her compartment? 
Perhaps she was in the other train ! Horrors ! We 
surged out of the car and onto the quay, to take a last 
desperate look around — and nearly collided with Mile. 
Damita, rushing into the car. No mistaking her . . . 
for once in a weary, disillusioning, interviewing life, a 
star as beautiful as she is on the screen. 

As she sped past us, we gathered a vision of symphony 
in blue and gray that Whistler would have loved to 
paint — slim tailleur of gray shot with blue; gray felt hat 
with band of blue and gray ribbon ; pale blue blouse ; blue 
and gray tie ; gray hose — not a note to mar the perfect 
harmony. 

We dodged back into the car — and again nearly collided 
with Mile. Damita, coming out. We flattened ourselves 
against the side of the narrow corridor and let her pass. 
{Continued on page 101) 



72 



Dise 



d 



^Z' 



That 

tell-tale moment 

before a dip 

Curious eyes are quick to detect the 
slightest flaw that modern bathing attire 
reveals. So, too, with sleeveless frocks, 
evening gowns, sheer hosiery, and knee- 
length skirts. Today, women are more 
careful than ever to remove the least 
suggestion of superfluous hair on arms, 
underarms, face, legs, or back of the neck. 

Feminine Daintiness 

So much admired by everyone is pre- 
served most easily with Del-a- tone Cream. 
In '3 brief minutes Del-a-tone Cream 
removes every trace of offending hairs. 
Leaves skin soft, white and velvety 
smooth. 

Applied directly from its handy tube, 
Del-a-tone Cream has no equal for com- 
plete removal of hair. Snow-white and 
pleasantly fragrant, it is far superior to 
such growth encouraging methods as 

shavingor pullingthe 
hair out by the roots. 

Del-a-tone cream 
or powder has been 
the choice of fasti- 
dious women for 
twenty years. Try it 
and you, too, will be 
convinced that the 
Del-a-tone way is the 
modern way to re- 
move hair. 




Hair-free legs 




Charming ! 
Del-a-tone gives added daintiness 



DEL-A-TONE 



Removes Hair in 3 Minutes 

Sold by drug and department stores, or sent prepaid in 
U.S. in plain wrapper $1.00. Money back if not satisfied. 
If you have never tried Del-a-tone, send coupon for 10c 
package free to Miss Mildred Hadley, Dept. 78 
The Delatone Co., 721 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



/ 



/ 

/ FREE 

/ 10c Package 
/ in U. S. only 

y Miss Mildred Hadley, 
y c/o The Delatone Co., 
j Dept. 78, 721 N. Michigan Ave. 
^Chicago, 111. 



. Please send me FREE, prepaid in plain 
^'wrapper, 10c size I have checked herewith. 
/ D Del-a-tone Cream D Del-a-tone (powder) 

/ 
y Name 

y Address .... f 

> City State . . / 



73 



.. ... _ 



/ 



N 



Q0% of the lovely complexions 
you see on the screen are cared for 

by Lux Toilet Soap 



ALL the beautiful stars in Hollywood 
. know that exquisitely smooth skin is 
essential to a success on the screen. 

Only genuinely lovely skin, say leading 
directors, can confidently face the all- 
revealing lights of the close-up. How 
wisely the stars care for their smooth skin ! 

'Nine out of ten screen stars use Lux 
Toilet Soap. There are in Hollywood 433 
important screen actresses, including all 
stars. 417 of these use Lux Toilet Soap to 
keep their lovely skin soft and smooth! 




Molly O'Day 
First National 



Luxury hitherto found 
only in French soaps at 50^ 
1.00 a cake — now just 10^ 



74 




10c 



EX TOILET SOAP cares for 
the skin the true French way 
for it is made by the famous method 
France developed and uses for her 
finest toilet soaps. Order some to- 
day — you, like the lovely screen stars, 
will enjoy the delicate fragrance of 
this firm white cake, the instant 
abundant lather which even hard 
water can't quell! It is so luxurious! 



All the great film 
studios have made it 
the official soap in 
their dressing rooms 



75 



F 




n Artist /* Black and White 



Steppeing out before stepping 
out from American pictures: 
Pola Negri essays a Russian 
role in one of her final — for 
the time being, at least — ap- 
pearances before her return 
to the Continent 





76 



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-77 



*s 



X 




is G/owningGlory 



One of the few players celebrated equally in the speaking and the 
speechless drama is Arthur Lubin. A recruit from the stage 
and still an occasional visitor to its realms, his pantomimic ability 
has won him recently important screen roles in "The Bush 
Ranger" and, yet more recently, in a new Tim McCoy Western 



78 




Step in before you step out 



Maybe a person can be a social success 
without the help of soap and water, but 
he is working against heavy odds. 

Wise people do not rely entirely on 
interesting talk and pleasing manners. 



They also enlist soap and water — with 
clean linen as a matter of course. 

They want to look right and feel 
right. They want to know they' re clean > 
clean through. 



There's Personality in SOAP &> WATER 

PUBLISHED BY THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN SOAP AND GLYCERINE PRODUCERS, INC., TO AID THE WORK OF CLEANLINESS INSTITUTE 



79 



r 



\ 




LILY, ROSE AND VIOLET.— How 
about pansies, orchids and what-not? I 
prefer daisies. Ramon Novarro can be 
reached at the Metro-Goldwyn Studios, 
Culver City, Cal. "Across to Singapore" 
is his latest picture. You know, he's in 
Europe vacationing. Audrey Ferris is 
playing in "Noah's Ark." Douglas Fair- 
banks, Jr., Barbara Kent and Helene 
Chadwick have the leads in "Modern 
Mothers." John Darrow's real name is 
Harry Simpson, brother of Alan Simpson, 
who also plays in pictures. 

BUSTER COLLIER FAN.— This coun- 
try is not going to ruin; it's going to the 
movies. Buster was born in New York 
City, February 22, 1902 ; has brown hair 
and eyes. His latest picture is "Tide 
of Empire." Write him at Warner Bros. 
Studios, 5842 Sunset Boulevard, Holly- 
wood, Cal., as the stars do not give out 
their home addresses. 

MARION R.— The three balls in front 
of a pawn-shop mean, two to one, you 
won't get it back. Write Reginald Denny 
at Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 
Gary Cooper is not married. Ralph Forbes 
is playing opposite Dorothy Mackaill in 
"The Whip." Jackie Coogan is not do- 
ing anything in pictures right now, but 
your letter will reach him at the Metro- 
Goldwyn Studios, Culver City, Cal. James 
Murray was born in New York City. Write 
Malcolm MacGregor at the Tiffany-Stahl 
Productions, 933 N. Seward Street, Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

B. E. S. A. LOVER OF BOATS.— And 
all this means brown-eyed, semi-athletic 
lover of boats. How about an ocean liner? 
Louise Brooks was born in Kansas twenty- 
three years ago. Has black hair and 
brown eyes, and you may write her at 
Paramount-Famous Studios, 5451 Mara- 
thon Street, Hollywood, Cal. Alice 
White is eighteen years old. Has reddish 
hair and you may write her at First Na- 
tional Studios, Burbank, Cal. Jeannette 
Loff at De Mille Studios, Culver City, 
Cal. Vera Reynolds, Harrison Ford, 
Sally Rand and Kathleen Key are 
playing in "Golf Widows." Yes, Neil 
Hamilton really sings in the picture 
"Mother Machree"; he also played on the 
stage before entering pictures. 

S. R. — How's Africa? You bet I'm glad 
to hear from you. Kent Meade is not 
playing in any picture at this writing. 
Clive Brook was born in London, Eng- 
land, June 1, 1891 ; he has dark brown hair 
and hazel eyes, is married and has two 
children. Write Carrol Nye at FBO 
Studios, 780 Gower Street, Hollywood, 



80 



I am at your service. Write to me and 
I'll promptly answer as many letters in 
MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE as 
space permits and reply by mail to the oth- 
ers. If you wish a reply by mail, please be 
sure to write your name and address and 
enclose stamps or a stamped, addressed 
envelope. Address me: The Answer Man, 
Motion Picture Magazine, Paramount 
Building, 1501 Broadway, New York City. 



Cal., where he's playing in "The Perfect 
Crime," starring Irene Rich and Clive 
Brook. 

RED HEAD— There's a flock of 'em in 
the movies. Larry Kent is not related to 
Arnold Kent. Larry's real name is Henri 
Trumbell. Harold Lloyd's wife is Mildred 
Davis; surely you remember her — she was 
his leading lady for quite awhile, and 
played with him in "Safety Last," "Grand- 
ma's Boy," etc. Ralph Forbes's latest pic- 
ture is "The Whip." Yes, I can supply 
you with photos of your favorites, twenty- 
five cents each, five for a dollar. 

SARA M. L. — You forgot to give me 
your last name. You can reach Alice 
White at First National Studios, Burbank, 
Cal. Her latest picture is "Lingerie." 
Lupe Velez at DeMille Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. Norma Shearer was born in 
Montreal, Canada, August 10, 1904. She 
has returned to the Coast after her short 
vacation in Europe. Her latest picture 
will be "Ballyhoo." Address your letter 
to her at the Metro-Goldwyn Studios, Cul- 
ver City, Cal. 

MISS NO-NAME— Raymond McKee and 
Eleanor Boardman had the leads in "The 
Silent Accuser." Virginia Brown Faire 
was Angelica in "Recompense." Lillian 
Rich played opposite Douglas MacLean in 
"Never Say Die." Marguerite Clark seems 
to have retired from the screen. Lillian 
Gish is in Europe right now. 

PAT. — William Haines is playing in 
"Excess Baggage." Buddy Rogers in 
"Red Lips." That's their real names. 
Write Louise Brooks at the Paramount 
Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. Betty Bronson was born in Tren- 
ton, N. J., November 17, 1906. She will 
make one or two pictures for Warner 
Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Holly- 
wood, Cal. Your letter will reach her 
there. Doris Dawson at First National 
Studios, Burbank, Cal. Lupe Velez at 
De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

B. B. — Yes, I know the Hawk brothers. 
"Mo and Tommy," that is the real names 



of Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell. 
Norma Talmadge was born May 2, 1895. 
Her latest picture is "A Woman Dis- 
puted" and Gilbert Roland plays oppo- 
site. Rin-Tin-Tin in "Land of the Silver 
Fox." Warner Baxter and Martha Sleeper 
are playing in "Danger Street." Write 
Mary Carr at De Mille Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. Milton Sills's latest picture is 
"The Barker." 

DOLLY AND POLLY.— How's Mil- 
waukee? Billie Dove is married to Irvin 
Willat. Mary Pickford was born April 8, 
1893. She and Doug are in Europe, where 
she is recovering from the shock of her 
mother's death. Clara Bow is single. 
Madge Bellamy is twenty-five years old ; 
real name is Philpotts. Her latest picture 
is "Mother Knows Best," and you ma\ 
write her at the Fox Studios, 1401 North 
Western Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. A 
Scotchman sent me his picture today. 
How does he look? I don't know; I 
haven't had it developed yet. 

WONDERING— Cease right now. Billie 
Dove's real name is Lillian Bohny; Mary 
Astor, Lucille Langhanke. Sue Carol was 
born in Chicago, 111., Oct. 3, 1907. Yes, 
Mary Pickford appeared in one or two 
scenes in "The Gaucho." Send me your 
name and address in regards to photos. 
Tom Tyler and Frankie Darro are playing 
in "The Texas Tornado." Write them at 
FBO Studios, 780 Gower St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

• A BIT NOSEY.— I wouldn't say that. 
Charles Farrell played the role of Timmy 
in "Sandy." Alice White is eighteen 
years old, has reddish-gold hair, and you 
may write her at First National Studios, 
Burbank, Cal. You bet Buddv's a wow. 
His latest picture is "Red Lips." Send 
your note to him at the Paramount Stu- 
dios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood. 
Cal. Mae Busch will play in Lon Chaney's 
"While the City Sleeps." Lars Hanson 
was born in Gothenberg. Sweden, June 1, 
1895. Is six feet tall, blond hair and blue 
eyes. 

F. GAYBILL — You'll have peaches 
down your way soon. Rudolph Cameron 
played ^opposite Lois Wilson in "Coney 
Island." Alphons Fryland was Vinicius, 
Andree Habay Petronius and Lillian Hall 
Davis was Lygia in "Quo Vadis," starring 
Emil Jannings. Lane Chandler was born 
June 1, 1901. Write Arthur Lake at the 
Universal Studios, Universal City, • Cal. 
Fred Thomson's latest picture is "Kit Car- 
son." Lloyd Bacon, son of Frank Bacon, will 
direct Al Jolson in "The Singing Fool.' 
{Continued on page 99) 



J^ U M M E R, / 



yet your 

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clingSj 

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Summer . . . with old ocean beckoning down the white sands . . . limpid lakes 
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Summer calling you to a thousand activities . . . ivhispering of romance in 
night silence . . . thrillingyou with the joy of living every golden hour intensely . 




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Name (print) 

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City and State 




81 



SOUTH SEASICK 



Up a tree? Up 
in what looks lik 



natives who once fished with a spear for 
their living have degenerated since the 
coming of the white man. The white man's 
diseases are fast depopulating the islands. 
It was well that they had brought their 
"beautiful native 
girl" for the pic- 
ture from Holly- 
wood, for the au- 
thor of "White 
Shadows" was 
either a poor judge 
of feminine beau- 
ties, or he fibbed ! 

Director Van 
Dyke has passed 
on the legend of 
the South Seas. He 
has given the pub- 
lic what it wants to 
believe ; that some- 
where on earth 
there is an en- 
chanted island in 
an azure sea, 
where soft breezes 
blow and soft eyes 
shine and man need 
not toil for a liv- 
ing. He has 
brought back only 
South Seas he did 
not find himself. 
The picture is 
filled with lovely 
brown maidens and 
wreaths of hibis- 
cus (or should one 
say hibiscuses?), 
with native feasts 
and tropic kisses, 
romantic beach- 
combers and in- 
toxicating dances. It is enough to start 
a trek of Long Island commuters and in- 
hibited spinsters toward the South Seas. 
It is guaranteed to trouble the dreams of 
fathers of large familes. 

No one who sees the picture they have 
made will believe that Tahiti is not what 
O'Brien calls it, "An earthly paradise." 
They will say, looking at the dreaming 
lagoons, the mountains and groves of 
banyan trees, "Those actor fellows must 
be crazy ! That's the most beautiful spot 
I've ever seen. The camera can't lie, can 
it? Trouble with those Hollywood birds, 
they're too soft. They've got to have 
things easy — " 

Turkish-Bath Beds 

"JWFaxy a time," says Director Van 
Dyke, "I said 'when I get back, I'm 
going to buy myself a corner lot in Death 
Valley, build a bungalow and settle down 
in comfort.' I've never felt such heat. 
Wet heat, steamy. I'd put on a fresh suit 
of white ducks in the morning and ten 
minutes later they'd be wringing wet. At 
night the bed sheets would be sodden a 
few moments after I got between them. 
I didn't even try to sleep. I'd get a few 
drinks just to cast a rosier light over the 
prospect of more months in Tahiti, and 
then I'd read or write all night. The next 
morning it would be raining. It rains 
every minute of the day, somewhere on the 
island, and between showers the sun 
would burn us up. We all had 'rain-tan.' 
It is much more painful than ordinary sun- 
burn. Inside of a week we were all ma- 
hogany-colored." 

Fresh from reading "White Shadows" 
the company came ashore with visions of 
living an idyllic life in a village of thatched 



(Continued from page 31) 

huts. But the French settlers who met 
them laughed at the suggestion. No, no ! 
A white man could not live like a native, 
unless he had gone native himself, as some 
few had. They took them to the best 




several, it would seem. Monte Blue and Raquel Torres seek refuge 
e a bad dream but is really a banyan tree in the South Sea jungle 



hotel of the town. The open public sewer 
ran, gurgling prettily outside their win- 
dows. When Monte Blue drove a nail 
into the wall of his room to hang his coat 
on, an astonishing procession of insect life 
swarmed out. Scorpions scuttled out of 
their boots in the morning, cockroaches as 
big as mice ran across the dining room 
table. 

Eating Fish Eyes 

"J got used to eating raw fish," Monte 
says. "All except their eyes. Tahitians 
consider fish eyes a great delicacy, but they 
look at one so reproachfully I honestly 
hadn't the heart ! I even got so I could 
eat pox, and when I tell you that is a mess 
made out of decayed breadfruit, you can 
see we didn't have a lot of choice on the 
menu card. The fruit is gorgeous to look 
at but it all tastes alike — bananas, plan- 
tain, apples, melons — you can't tell the 
difference." 

But the native feasts, described so rhap- 
sodically by the lyric Mr. O'Brien? 
Those charming social affairs where all 
sorts of delicacies are served on leaves by 
native belles with flashing smiles? 

The South Sea Islanders have inherited 
with other white man's vices, his addiction 
to tin cans. Canned salmon is their 
favorite fish now, the delicacy they serve 
their guests. And those native beauties 
promised faithfully by O'Brien, those in- 
nocent light hearted damsels who bathe in 
the shallow lagoons and dance in grass 
skirts, those cafe an hit ladies who win 
the hearts of white men away from their 
Helens and Gertrudes at home, what were 
they doing when Monte and his friends 
attended a feast? 



Here is the saddest news of all, brought 
back by the "White Shadows" com- 
pany. There are no native beauties! 
There are no flashing smiles and long 
clouds of silken black tresses. The in- 
habitants of Tahiti 
lose their teeth 
early. The most 
coquettish smile 
lacks something 
in seduction when 
it discloses four 
front teeth missing. 
South Sea girls 
have taken to boy- 
ish bobs like the 
girls in the movies 
they see every 
week. The cos- 
tume considered 
stylish by dusky 
flappers, a simple 
square of tapa 
cloth wrapped 
about the middle 
and tied carelessly 
behind, displays 
the figure remark- 
ably, but — I have 
the word of all the 
men in the "White 
Shadows" com- 
pany — there is en- 
tirely • too much 
figure to display. 

The publicity de- 
partment of the 
Metro-Goldwyn 
company, working 
hard to earn their 
salaries, lists the 
hardships of the 
voyage in this lyric 
outburst. "To get this picture Metro sent 
an expedition of sixty men and women more 
than five thousand miles. They encountered 
terrific hardships, climbed mountains seven 
thousand feet high, braved tropical storms, 
lost themselves in the depths of jungles 
never before explored — " 

Stewed Cockroaches 

IV/JoNTE Blue, Director Van Dyke and the 
rest of the company have a list of 
harder hardships than these. Smells, 
squeaky tin phonographs grinding out ten- 
year-old tunes, cockroaches in the stew, 
centipedes in the beds, poor champagne at 
a terrific price, daytime in the South Seas, 
night-time in the South Seas, a mail 
steamer once a month, lack of barber shops. 
A man may climb steep mountains and 
swim fierce torrents without complaining, 
but to go around with a week-old growth 
of whiskers and needing a haircut takes 
real heroism. 

It should be some consolation to those 
who see the finished picture to remember 
this — after they have witnessed it. For 
thereby they may get a double thrill. The 
first will be one of delight in the beauty 
and romance of the setting as it appears 
on the screen, and a yearning some day to 
go there themselves, splash about in the 
baby-blue water of the lagoons and watch 
the native girls dance beneath the palms, 
black against the moonlight. And the 
second will be the consoling thought, when 
they reach home and have to remember 
about leaving a note for the milkman f.ir 
only one bottle tomorrow morning, that I 
they will not have to sleep between sodden 
sheets or have in the morning to make 
their breakfast of canned salmon, decayed 
breadfruit and fish eyes. 



82 




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83 



\ 




The Shadow 

Perhaps it's a gray hair, a wrin- 
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a little hint, but its flickering- 
shadow across your mirror awak- 
ens a longing for youth — a long- 
ing to have and to hold its appear- 
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GOURAUDS 

ORIENTAL 

CREAM 

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430 Lafayette Street _______ New York City 

Check shade desired: White □ Flesh CI Rachel EI 



Name. 
Street- 
City ._ 




Directee and director directly after the last step in the production of "Walking 
Back." The directee is Sue Carol ; the director is Rupert Julian. Success! 

Too Nice to Love 



(Continued fr 

the &c*een. And she meant the retire- 
ment. King had made "The Jack Knife 
Alan" and the bills were paid. 

Tom Ince persuaded her to return. He 
convinced her that to throw away one's 
medium of self-expression is waste, and 
the world has no room for wasters. 

More time passed, and the Vidor hearth- 
stone was assailed. Disrupted. Broken. 
And Florence was left alone with her 
baby, her work and several smashed-up 
dreams. 

She went through a period of very hu- 
man readjustment. She acquired a tran- 
sient superiority complex. She looked down 
on pictures and on the people who worked 
in pictures. She told everybody that she 
was working for the money there was in 
it and for no other reason. She buttered 
her bread and made mock of the butter. 
She drew her fastidious skirts aside and 
lived in a discriminating seclusion, emerg- 
ing only when necessary. 

She moved, and still moves among the 
"nice people" of Hollywood. The social 
set. "These Charming People" of movie- 
land. The Antonio Morenos. The Oliver 
Moroscos. The Conrad Nagels. 

She did a great deal of reading. A great 
deal of thinking. Some living. And the 
change began to ferment. 

You Just Know She Is a Lady 

"^TfE lunched together at the Ambassador 
the other day. I was in the corridor, 
and presently and imperceptibly Florence 
appeared, slender in a silk suit of dull reds 
and tans, a natural colored straw hat, a 
string of tiny, matched pearls. It is su- 
perfluous to say that she would wear 
neither artificial flowers, spurious jewelry 
nor a conspicuous make-up. 

She looks like a lady. She speaks like 
a lady. She is gracious and quiet, and has 



om page 59) 

some sort of accent, and is completely 
self-possessed. But if you assume that 
ladies cannot live and love, you are griev- 
ously mistaken. One does not have to 
utter loud obscenities, wave adulterous 
banners and otherwise crash the conven- 
tions in order to have red blood and a 
beating heart. 

Florence Vidor omits from her vocabu- 
lary the cheap cliches of the day. Any 
child could be in her presence uncon- 
taminated by sewer persiflage. I know of 
three other persons of whom I could say 
the same. She neither indulges in pro- 
fanity nor does she make sexual aberra- 
tions table talk. 

We mentioned the freedom of speech of 
this day and age. "It seems to me to be 
a pity," Miss Vidor said. "It is not that I 
disapprove on any grounds called moral. 
I believe in the right to discuss any topic 
under the sun so long as it is done for a 
reason. But salaciousness — it seems to me 
that this ruthless and reckless banning of 
all reticence is destroying the charm of 
living, and I have found that to be the 
most important thing in the world. 

"Out of my experience, personal and 
professional, if I have any philosophy, that 
is it — the charm of living. 

"It embraces so many things. The little 
things of being a charming hostess. Of 
regulating a household. It involves sim- 
plicity of dress. Good books to read. Fine 
music to hear. Appreciations. The ca- 
pacity for friendship and for love. The 
lyric tones of loneliness." 

I crashed the charm of living by asking, 
"Are you ever lonely?" 

"One night a week — " there was that 
quiet smile, "I am sometimes very lonely 
one night a week. For the rest of the 
time I think I rather enjoy it — a manless 
world. 

"One never knows, of course, what one 



84 



will do. It is so foolish to make self- 
prophecies. To say 'I will never marry 
again!' or 'I will never fall in love again!' 
How does one know? Part of the charm 
of living is the unpredictability of living. 
I may fall in love again. I may marry 
again. I don't know. I only know that 
I will have to be very sure, that, for better 
or worse, I must know that it is for all 
time. I have won through to peace by a 
hardy route and I shall not sacrifice it 
lightly. 

Is There Such a Man? 

"If I could meet a man stronger than I, 
my mental superior ... a man who 
could rule by the very force of his 
superiority . . . such stuff as a Napoleon 
is made of, a Mussolini, a Bernard Shaw. 
Some being with whom I could spend my 
days perpetually looking up . . . then, 
perhaps . . . 

"Failing that, or with that, I have 
found that the work I am doing and want 
to do, is worth while. To find a self-ex- 
pression that matters is the most import- 
ant thing for the woman who is doing it. 
I believe in pictures. Amusement — what 
better can we do for a world which, after 
all, has little enough of it. And by amus- 
ment I do not mean the obvious. I mean 
the more profound amusement that evokes 
tears and the pain that is sweeter than 
pleasure. 

"I think we all bother too much about 
little things. Shopping. Social obliga- 
tions. Going places. We never sit a day 
through contemplating a sunny patch of 
wall, leaving the channel open for greater 
things to come through ... we attach 
too much importance to ourselves, who are 
so really unimportant in the mighty scheme 
of things." 

From Texas came a lady . . . 

This summer, at this writing, the lady 
is in Cannes . . . she is seeing Europe 
for the first time . . . It is certain that 
into the charming pattern of her life 
Florence Vidor will weave new threads 
from the old world. What mill they be? 




The Paramount comedian introduces his new 
invention, the combination golf trousers and 
golf bag. Judging from Chester Conklin's ex- 
pression, something is apparently wrong 




Ttiuur New Beauty IDatih 

irudtardfy m.a£e0 



' I ^HE young girl or woman 
-*- ol tooay wants immediate 

results alter the use ol some 

beauty preparation. un.e doesn t 

want to wait weeks lc 
>fii 



Lor sonie sign 
ol improvement in her sltm. JL his 
is one reason lor the popularity 
ol the new J_anit -Deauty Jjath. 

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86 




Mr. and Mrs. Jack Mulhall get along, Mr. Mulhall says, because Mrs. Mulhall 
doesn't take at all seriously Mr. Mulhall's interest in girls other than Mrs. Mulhall 

A Jack of One Trade 

(Continued from page 55) 



put myself in almost anybody's place, for 
believe me, I've been through enough ex- 
periences in my life to make it fairly easy 
for me to understand the other fellow's 
point of view. 

"I've been just about down and out. 
Right here in Hollywood, too. You see, 
when I first started in pictures, things came 
too easy for me. The second picture I 
.ever worked in, for Universal, they made 
a star of me. That's absolutely the worst 
thing that can happen to a young actor. 

"Did I think I was good? Ask me! 
Why, I thought I had this movie business 
in the palm of my hand. That nobody 
could teach little Jack Mulhall anything. 
I was the curly-haired boy from Wap- 
pinger's Falls, and I. took it big. 

"I didn't know then, what a fight it is 
to keep your popularity, once you've got 
it. I'd been given an average amount of 
intelligence at birth, I guess, but I cer- 
tainly wasn't using it in those days. If I 
had worked then, the way I work now, 
every minute when I'm in front of the 
camera, I'd be as rich as Harold Lloyd 
today. He was an extra man, working 
around the lot in those days. None of us 
dreamed what a talented actor and shrewd 
business man he'd turn out to be. 

No Other Suit and No Overcoat 

"T remember one time — this may sound 
funny to you but it was a tragedy to 
me then — one time Hal Cooley borrowed 
my 'other suit' without bothering to ask 
me for it. I had had a swell overcoat and 
someone stole it from my dressing-room 
just a little while before the suit disap- 
peared. I'll tell you, when I opened that 
closet door and found my entire wardrobe 
had disappeared, I thought it was the end 
of the world for me. An actor has to 
have some clothes, you know. He can't 
go along indefinitely with just one suit 
and no overcoat. 

"And there were members of my family 
dependent on me. That's what made it so 
hard. It wasn't as though I had no re- 



sponsibility except for myself. Gee, I was 
low. 

"When Hal brought the suit back, I 
didn't know whether to kiss or kill him. 
But in the end we got a laugh out of it. 

"I remember the first car I ever had. 
Who doesn't ? I drove it up to the house 
as a surprise for my wife. That was my 
first wife. She died, later, and I was left 
alone with the responsibility of raising my 
little boy, as you know. 

"But — oh, yes, about the car. I insisted 
on taking my wife for a ride. She didn't 
want to go, and no wonder. It was a 
second-hand car, the seats were 'way up 
high, and it snorted in all directions. Well, 
we chugged through Hollywood in a cloud 
of smoke, and then the darn thing stalled 
on that grade out by the Los Angeles 
Country Club. It was a case of a fellow 
making his wife walk home from an auto- 
mobile ride. 

"Serious things, and funny things — a lot 
of them have happened to me. 

"After a while I got some pretty good 
engagements. The Talmadge girls were 
always awfully nice to me. I made several 
pictures with them. 

"But for a long time I was just a lead- 
ing man. Then First National co-starred 
me with Dorothy Mackaill. The fans liked 
those pictures, and when I've finished 'The 
Butter and Egg Man,' Dorothy and I are 
going to make another picture together. 

Being Himself 

"Y ou sa -id a kittle while ago that I'm 
more like my real self in these recent 
comedy-dramas I've been doing, than I 
ever was before. I guess that's true. I 
am playing myself on the screen, now. 
Until I tried it, I didn't know that people 
wanted me that way. 

"But it's the hardest work I ever did, 
and don't let anyone fool you. You see, 
you're more or less unconscious of your 
own personality. You do or say this and 
that because it's natural to you. But when 
you get in front of a camera, everything 



is timed, every movement must be planned 
beforehand. To be yourself instinctively 
is one thing, but to be yourself deliberately 
is another, if you understand what I mean. 
But now I'm getting analytical and no 
Irishman has a right to be that. 

"I'm glad you like our house out in 
Beverly Hills. Here's a laugh. When 
Evelyn and I built that house, we decided 
to make it large enough so that we could 
entertain on the grand scale, if we wanted 
to. And we haven't had a party since we 
moved in ! Maybe we will have, one of 
these days. I'll say this, that party should 
be good, after planning a house around it ! 

His Estimate of Evelyn 

"And about Evelyn. She's a wonderful 
•^ wife, for a man like me. I'm moody. 
I kid around a lot, but I get awfully blue 
sometimes. It's the Irish in me, probably. 
When things go wrong at the studio all 
day, as they occasionally do, I come home 
lower than an eel's chin. 

"When that happens, Evelyn just leaves 
me alone until I snap out of it. She under- 
stands me. Why she even understands 
that I can like other pretty girls without 
falling for them. Every now and then 
one of our well meaning friends, you know 
the kind, asks her if she doesn't get jealous 
of my leading women. Evelyn just laughs 
and says, 'If I worried about every pretty 
girl Jack works with, or meets in the 
studio, I'd go crazy.' She's wonderful. 
There aren't many like her. 

"Help ! It's one o'clock. Come back on 
the set, won't you ? I like to have people 
around. Yes, I'm staking a lot on this 
picture, 'The Butter and Egg Man.' I'm 
being starred in it, you know, and maybe 
the Pride of Wappinger's Falls isn't giving 
it everything he's got, after fifteen up and 
down years in this movie business. 

"I don't look old enough to have been 
in pictures fifteen years, and on the stage 
before that? Sure, it's the pure life I lead, 
and being Irish, that keeps me young." 




Franz Slavicek, of the Vienna Opera Com- 
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87 




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The moon is a lady, as everyone knows, and in this instance the lady s 
name is Frances Lee 



Act and Grow Young 

{Continued from page 50) 



and this, that and the other, and you do 
it. Then for the next hour you sit on the 
sidelines reading the fan magazines, or 
rather looking through them to see if 
there are any pictures of yourself in them." 
"What about these here girls who get 
aged before they are thirty and find their 
movie careers over ?" I questioned. 

Indulgence Spells Oblivion 

" Just faulty technique," she explained 
J with an odd, hearty, high-low laugh. 
"There's two mistakes they're liable to 
make. Either they eat like hogs, drink 
like fishes and generally indulge them- 
selves, or else they exercise for what I 
believe is called the Body Beautiful with 
such remorseless vigor that in a short time 
they have muscles all over them that you 
could hang your hat on." 

"And how about yourself?" 

"I just let well enough alone," she said. 
"My friends are always coming up to me 
to ask what I put on my face, how I keep 
off lines under my eyes, and how my figure 
remains what you see for yourself. I have 
not any secrets at all. I don't put anything 
on my face. I don't fiddle about with 



my hair, because it's naturally curly. Na- 
ture contributed them to me in a dark 
moment and I accepted them. There's 
really nothing to be done about it. 

"I eat exactly what I like, but I am 
one of the lucky ones who are not af- 
fected by food and never get plump." 

"What about these- — er — jollifications 
which are said to take place in Hollywood 
under cover of night?" I asked. "Is that 
sort of thing another aging factor in the 
film fraternity?" 

"Well, I suppose so. What with all we 
hear of this, that and the other being hit 
over the head with a champagne bottle and 
somebody being shot in the pants, there 
must still be plenty of wild life in these 
parts, but to tell you the truth I've always 
been too busy to make many investigations 
into it. Not in pictures, you understand, 
but principally with my flower business. I 
have five flower shops in town and believe 
me, they took an awful lot of work to start 
and make successful. Now they're go- 
ing so merrily that we expect this year 
to do over half a million dollars' worth of 
business. But I keep on going around to 
see that everything's going as it should, 
and this, that and the other. 



'"Flowers ! After dealing with them as 
if they were hunks of perishable cheese 
for years, I am still crazy about them. My 
house, you know, is called 'Mia Flora.' 
Flowers have always been a part of my 
life, and I could not get along without 
masses of them all around me. Talking 
of business, I've also dabbled pretty suc- 
cessfully in oil and real estate here. I've 
been one of the lucky ones. 

She Has Six Telephones 

"I'm not sufficiently important to have the 
studios galloping after me, but what 
do I care? Every now and again a part 
comes up for me, and to play it makes a 
nice change from the round of business. 
I shall go on working in pictures just as 
long as anybody wants me. You probably 
think I have been out of movie work for 
a long time, but actually I have done sev- 
eral pictures every year — recently, though, 
chiefly for smaller companies, so that no- 
body saw me. Of course, my flower busi- 
ness brings me in contact with all the pic- 
ture crowd, and they don't have a chance 
to forget my existence as they do with so 
many old-timers. You won't find me look- 
ing for work in the studios, but I'm at the 
end of six telephones whenever the spirit 
moves the producers to give me a buzz." 
This amazing young person was wanted 
by Mr. Cruze to interpret something or 
other — this or that — for the benefit of the 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer camera. She had 
sat still talking to me quite long enough, 
anyway ; her diminutive feet wanted to 
dance her away. As I said before, her 
jaw dropped in stupefaction when I grace- 
fully mentioned that I had been pleased to 
meet her. Let's have some more like Kath- 
leen. She's the type that loves nice things — 
flowers, interviewers and this, that and the 
other. 





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89 





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Prohibition suffers a severe setback in California: when Myrna Loy feels like 
celebrating, she simply takes things into her own hands 

Are Screen Kisses Hot or Cold ? 

(Continued from page 29) 



thrilling to have this fiery Hungarian for 
a leading man, but it's all in the day's 
work to Corinne. 

Eddie Lowe, now working with Colleen 
Moore, frankly cast his vote for her as 
the most enchanting girl he has ever 
worked with, but such admiration is en- 
tirely that of one good trouper for an- 
other. 

"In the first pictures I ever made," he 
said, "the love sequences seemed very per- 
sonal to me, but not now. The perfect 
love scene is that in which the two players 
blend their emotions, as the notes of a sym- 
phony are blended." 

I told Eddie that was pretty good, 
whereat he came down to earth with a 
bang. 

"Lil has a part in this picture," he re- 
ferred to his wife, Libyan Tashman, "and, 
Oh boy, what a break I get ! In one se- 
quence I grab her and hurl her out of my 
apartment. What a break for a husband ! 
I'm just waiting to see if those scenes 
seem real." 

Eddie has a perfectly grand sense of 
humor, so has Libyan, so they'll probably 
have a swell time. 



The Villains Have a Say 



W: 



r E had to have a couple of villains in 
this, just for variety, so I hunted up 
George Bancroft and Bill Powell. Two 
contrasting types, you'll agree. I'm afraid 
it would be impossible to write a story 
quite worthy of the unusual Mr. Bancroft, 
but here's an honest-to-goodness glimpse 
of him, anyway. 

He considered my questions gravely for 



several minutes and then said in a hushed 
voice, "Stand up." 

I obliged. 

Air. Bancroft walked slowly toward me, 
something in the manner of a somnam- 
bulist, his hands stretched before him. 

"Suppose I were in love with you," he 
suggested. 

"All right, if it's all in fun," I replied 
obediently, wondering what this had to do 
with the story. 

Mr. Bancroft stopped, a few paces off, 
and dropped his hands to his side. 

"That's the way it would be," he sighed. 
"Women are so holy to me that I couldn't 
touch one I loved, even with my finger- 
tips. In my screen career, I never kissed 
a girl until my last picture. During that 
scene I thought only of my mother. A 
man's love for his mother is his most 
sacred inspiration, so it was no discourtesy 
to the girl." 

"Certainly not, Mr. Bancroft," I as- 
sured him and ft him gazing dreamily 
into space while I followed Bill Powell's 
trail. 

And it was Bill who threw the bomb- 
shell. I've never seen him in such a sur-: 
prising mood. 

"Hollywood," he exclaimed violently, 
"is the most immoral place in the world ! 
And why? Because there are too many 
good-looking men and beautiful girls 
thrown into contact with one another here. 

"Am I attracted to the girls I work 
with? Certainly. What man wouldn't be? 
Where will you find so much beauty as in 
Hollywood? Why should I or any man 
pretend to be indifferent to it, or to the 
girls we make love to, day after day?" 



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Has Anybody Here Seen Connie ? 

(Continued from page 49) 



Being cautious, which comes of being 
a New Yorker, we launched a speculative 
query — "Are you the young lady we, ah, 
ahem, we're, now — that is, talking to Jim 
about — at least to " 

"Well, I don't know what you had in 
your mind, if anything, or what you think 
you ordered. But, I'm Connie, and prob- 
.ably we're going out to the Ambassador," 
she shot at me in a soft even tone of voice 
that put me to shame to think that I had 
for one moment doubted that she was Con- 
nie — the real genuine Connie. 

A box-seat in Cocoanut Grove at the 
Ambassador — and on a crowded night at 
that — a renewing of acquaintance with 
Colonel Denham, who polices the countless 
miles of spacious corridor and keeps an 
ever watchful eye to prevent the wicked 
machinations of designing guests. 

A. few words then to Jimmie, the dark- 
haired head waiter whose suave smile brings 
much largess to his larder. Why, a friend of 
mine has been supplying Jimmie with 
twenty-dollar hats that are the most care- 
ful picking from among the best his big 
factory turns out. Another friend — well 
— Jimmie is important all right — but let's 
talk about Connie. 

Of course, Connie is a good dancer — 
she would have to be good' to dance with 
me. Paraphrasing, as I am, the remark 
of the pretty girl who worked a few 
weeks in Philadelphia, "you'd have to be 
good to get three thousand dollars in 
Philadelphia." 

Among Those Present 

Dut Connie is good — good to look upon 
— as restful as ' the warm effulgent 
glow of a crimson tinted California sun- 
set sky with patents pending. And good 
to talk to — about or simply at. She 
knows her Hollywood values far better 
than a Los Angeles realtor knows the his- 
toric background of Hacienda Los Cerri- 
tos, which is right at his front door. 

"That girl at the very next table to us 
—the pretty girl with the light of titian 
red in her hair — is Jacqueline Logan. 
And there's Camilla Horn. And John 
Barrymore. The two knockout Irish girls 
are Molly O'Day and Sally O'Neil. There's 
Myrna Kennedy and Jimmy Hall. I don't 
know who the other well-dressed and suc- 
cessful looking older people are, but, judg- 
ing from the pride that those two gray- 
haired men take in dancing with her and 
gathering from the smiles with which the 
mature women, who are evidently the 
wives, greet the happy husbands after the 
alternate dances — why I would assume," 
reasoned Connie, "that they simply must 
be relatives." That does sound reason- 
able at that, doesn't it? 

You know Connie is only about five feet 
four inches or so tall, and if one were to 
confine one's guess to Connie's dancing 
weight, as she looks demurely up at you 
from chestnut eyes set deep in black out- 
lines of rounded eyelashes — well — her soft, 
demure and prettily rounded little body, 
would weigh no more heavily on your 
arms than would a care-free memory rest 
upon your mind. But, of course, Connie 
must weigh something, and as Death Val- 
ley Scotty of fond memory, with his five- 
gallon hat and his brilliant red knitted 
necktie, appraised things in the hotel lobby, 
"One hundred and ten on the hoof" but 
certainly never an ounce on my hoof. 

Connie's Blighted Life 

Ronnie spoke from a sensitive mouth 

that foretold her immediate attitude 

even before words left her lips. Sort of 



like clouds over a sunkist valley when 
her lips twitched downward, and bright 
fulsome sunshiny words when they turned 
ever so slightly upward. 

Most everyone danced on that floor that 
night, and just a record of the names 
that the little dancing partner poured into 
my ears would read as ponderously and 
as imposingly as a list of the arrival of 
buyers on any August day in the "New 
York Times" — and sorry I am to say it — 
it would mean just about as much. Oh, 
there are just too many important people 
in the movies for words. 

Yes, like so many of us, Connie has 
been married. It all turned out too badly — 
sort of a disillusion — he was much older — 
and it was hard to share him with other 
women. She had in her own words ac- 
quired "horse sense" in the process and 
marriage ' was to mean something wholly 
different the next time. 

"Llorse sense" was certainly no legiti- 
mate lead upon which to hang further con- 
versation, but we did drift into talking 
about cowboys and Western stuff. 

Of course, and I don't say this in any 
cruel or sarcastic way, I believed every- 
thing that Connie told me. I wanted to 
■ — she looks like a square shooter. 

But, she did murmur something about 
^doing something important in a Western 
'picture or two — maybe she was with Uni- 
versal, if my hazy memory focuses clearly 
on the event. She did speak of the young- 
er Laemmle in pleasing manner, and the 
Fox Studios were close to her affections. 

She flatly accused me of having a stock 
expression of using a long drawn out and 
rather ridiculously attenuated O-h-y-e-a-h, 
which calls for an ever rising inflection as 
yqu run the scale. Of course, that's quite 
New Yorkish, and while it sounds the way 
you would expect Jimmie Walker to say 
it from out the corner of his mouth, it 
nevertheless gives you the desired big- 
city manner. 

She Sighs for Footlights 

YY/ell, if I have a stock expression, Con- 
nie at least has had some stock ex- 
perience. Yes, indeed, the legitimate stage 
is her ambition, and she repeated a dozen 
or more familiar names of movie nobs 
who were finding complete expression 
across the footlights to their dear, dear 
audiences. 

Somewhere, not too far from the Am- 
bassador, stands a yellow apartment house 
at the top of a slight hill — slippery tile 
steps, wet with a spring fog, led up stairs 
to the cavernous doorway. Connie's lips 
smiled and 1 knew pleasant words were 
to be mine. "Good-night, and please, 
please, don't forget Connie." And then as 
though she would rid herself of all de- 
ception, she added as generous measure, 
"my real name is Consuello, and I believe," 
she hesitatingly added, "that it means con- 
solation." A warm strong clasp from a 
well tapered hand, a pair of starry eyes, 
and like one of Houdini's masterpieces, she 
was gone. My lips almost kissed my own 
crude hand instead of the vanished one. 

Like a shock it dawned on me. What 
was Connie's last name — how stupid of me 
— not even a phone number, and worst of 
all, when I called Jim in the morning, he 
had apology in his every word and halt- 
ingly explained that he just couldn't find 
a single solitary extra girl for our last 
night's party. 

But we had an extra girl — an extra- 
ordinary little girl. And doesn't somebody 
know Connie — please think — who is she 
anyway ? 



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Art for Ark's SaKe 

(Continued from page 33) 



know. It takes eight or ten men — stalwart 
men — to move them from one place to 
another. And the men sweat while doing 
so. In all there are nearly two hundred 
electricians employed. 

While the sets were being built, over a 
thousand carpenters drew pay checks, 
while three thousand other artizans labored 
at their trades. And in a few weeks the 
structures they have reared will be swept 
away by torrents released from the three 
huge tanks, while extra people scramble 
for the safety of a studio Ararat. 

One day's payroll amounted to a hun- 
dred thousand dollars. Five thousand 
extras were employed. And so expedi- 
tiously were they handled, that when it 
came time to eat, the mob was fed in 
fifteen minutes. But it took fifty men six 
hours to prepare the lunch boxes. 

Sun-Proof Make-Up 

P.he night before the call went forth for 
five thousand, sixty assistant directors 
were called in conference with Curtiz, 
Koenig and Zanuck, who wrote the story. 
The morrow's battle strategies had been 
mapped out on blue-prints. Each alarum 
and flourish, every sortie and retreat was 
planned with perfect precision. Every 
lieutenant had his group of players. On 
the lot huge signs marked "Priests and 
Fanatics," "Soldiers," "Slaves and Vir- 
gins," directed each group to the spot 



where costumes were thrust through little 
windows. Thence to the dressing-rooms 
where their nudity was sprayed with stain, 
supplemented from time to time by dabs 
with sponges applied by ever-watchful 
make-up men. Then, led by the assistant 
in charge, on the set to await the signal. 
Incidentally, the make-up liquid contains 
properties to guard against the sun. 

That morning all roads led to Warners. 
The streets for miles about were clogged 
with parked cars. A score of extras 
were carried from the lot exhausted by 
the heat. These were cared for in the 
emergency hospital on the set, as were 
those others who suffered minor bruises 
from spear pricks, or the jostling of the 
mob. Elephants, camels, and those odd- 
looking beasts called yaks, made the scene 
still more bizarre. Signals for the various 
pieces of action were given by the sirens. 
No lesser sound could have been heard. 

Twenty-three cameras clicked when 
Curtiz called "Action !" And seven "still" 
cameras shot pictures to illustrate such 
yarns as this. The scene was massed 
brilliance, like a field of vari-colored pop- 
pies. Yet the photography is in black and 
white. But the picture is on panchromatic 
film, treated with a special sensitizing 
emulsion. Thus each color will register 
its own peculiar shade, lighter or darker 
than those surrounding it. Experiment 
proved that the film was especially sensi- 
tive to red. Hence red tones predominated. 



94 



/ 



Had green or blue been used through 
some inadvertence, more light would have 
been essential — more expense entailed. 

The longest shot photographed is twelve 
hundred feet. This is in the square out- 
side the temple. Several A number 1 
orgies are staged in it to show Warner 
Brothers' ideas of a good wild racket 
thrown in the days of old man Noah. 
Those were the days ! In the eyes of an 
extra man, only slightly younger than the 
patriarch himself, there shone the sad 
light of reminiscence as the ancient beard 
dipped deep in a wine bowl, filled — alas — ■ 
with the juice of the grape — unfermented. 
Mike Curtiz spied that look. 

"Hey, old man, you 'ave perhaps been 
dronk sometime in the life, is eet not?" 

The toothless mumbler grinned widely, 

"Then you shall h'act eet," announced 
the bronzed director. And the palsied 
gran'ther was moved to a spot before the 
camera, and surrounded by luscious ladies 
who mockingly caressed him, and pressed 
him with wine which dripped from his 
loose mouth to stain his beard and rai- 
ment. Perhaps — who can tell — it was in- 
deed Don Juan returned feeble and im- 
potent to an awful punishment. Anyway, 
he did well in his part. Watch for him. 

Twenty Certified Virgins 

T^he twenty virgins, vouched for by the 
.Central Casting Office, were dragged 
screaming to an altar, stalwart soldiers 
tore their slight covering away and branded 
their breasts with irons that smoked most 
realistically. Then they were cast down 
the steps to be caught skilfully by other 
chaps as they fell on a pile of soft 
cushions. 

"Make an adjustment with those girls," 
someone ordered. "Give them each two- 
and-a-half extra." And while they didn't 
refuse the money, none expected it. Each 
was happy to take the risk of the tumble 
for the sake of that instant of being be- 
fore the camera's eye. 




All togged up for the jolly old Derby, just 

like the Prince of Wales. You must admit 

that Ralph Forbes is a dead ringer for the 

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They tell us that Josephine Dunn, recently signed as leading lady for William 

Haines in "Excess Baggage," goes to work this way every morning 



"Bring on the eight drunken soldiers," 
shouted the director. And the eight, spit- 
ting cotton from the draught and the mere 
suggestion of a drink, simulated the care- 
free amorousness of wine-fuddled war- 
riors from the beginning of time. Over 
in one corner an ox-like slave-driver 
sniped a cigarette. Another look. Yes, 
Joe Bonomo, the Coney Island strong-man 
who used to sell ice-cream sandwiches. 

"Dor-o-theeeee, hand me my make-up 
box, dearie," sang a Christian martyr to a 
courtezan, and receiving it, gently powder- 
patted' a charmingly upturned nose. Was 
it Dolores of the Irish eyes? Yes. No — ■ 
her "stand-in" girl. A dead ringer for Cos- 
tello, a trifle shorter, a bit more slender, 
but features almost identical. For, you 
see, the "stand-in" saves the star from the 
arduous labor of stalling around until it 
is actually time to shoot the scene. 

Back to the orgy. Food as well as 
drink. Greedy creatures. A steer is being 
barbecued in the background. Only it's 
a horse. Cheaper. A property man brings 
on great joints of steaming meat. These 
are handed to the extras, who glance at 
the carcass on the great spit and seem to 
lose their appetites. 

Broiled Horse du Jour 

"j7 et is gude beef f rash from the restau- 

*^ rant," shouts Curtiz. "Look !" and 

seizing a huge bone from a nearby hand he 



sinks his teeth deep without hesitation. 
"Come," he calls, "you are 'ongry! Eat — 
so — grrrr !" and he snarls over the meat 
like a ravenous dog, or a Babylonian beg- 
gar. It is enough. They are convinced. 
Watch how they go to that food in the pic- 
ture. Ha ! Wonder if it was beef ? Ha ! 

On with the dance. Let joy be unre- 
fined ! No one can be offended. These 
are despised pagans. No Christians would 
enjoy such natural revelry. They'll be 
punished for all this fun. Just wait for 
the flood sequences. The worse they carry 
on, the more they must suffer. Hurrah for 
virtue ! Old man Noah was a good old 
soul ! But what a lot of fun he missed ! 

What daring, what imagination, these 
picture people have. There never was a 
Noah. Or if you're a fundamentalist, at 
least admit that he lived and died a thou- 
sand centuries before the first feeble light 
of history penetrated the world a brief 
three thousand years ago. Yet here he is. 
His life, his time, reproduced to make a 
movie holiday. 

Stupendous ! Graybeards would never 
attempt it. Age is cautious, and some- 
times wise. But the cry of youth is the 
cry of the Caesars — "Semper Avanti" — 
always forward. Thus, youthful Jack 
Warner, and youthful Darryl Zanuck, and 
youthful Michael Curtiz and youthful Wil- 
liam Koenig shoot a million with a smile 
to make the most gigantic motion picture 
spectacle the world has ever known. 



96 



Brass Will Tell 

(Continued from page 53) 
From Store to Stardom 

IV/Tinnie Simp was destined for big things 
since her babyhood. "That gal'll get 
along," her farmer father declared 
proudly, as Minnie snatched little Willy's 
lollypop away. "You just can't hold her 
back." The day came when Minnie left 
for the big city. She got a job slinging 
hash in a white tile lunchroom and she 
was such a go-getter they kept on promot- 
ing her until one day she stood in the win- 
dow slinging wheat cakes up in the air 
and catching them on a griddle. Minnie 
put on such a good show they gave her the 
star place on the bill in their Fifth Avenue 
place. The gal was an artist. She lay 
awake nights thinking of new frills for 
her act and when she perfected a triple 
somersault, the folks back home couldn't 
restrain their pride. But Minnie wasn't 
entirely satisfied. "I ought to be throw- 
ing custard pies around in the movies, 
with a talent like mine," she said to her- 
self. One day Mr. Blankberg joined 
the throng of admirers watching her. One 
look at Minnie and he was inside. "You 
have such wonderful eyes," he panted. 
Minnie gave him a shy look and saw he 
was wearing a diamond horseshoe scarf- 
pin. "You flatterer !" she cooed, her eyes 
still glued on the pin. 

A year later Minnie's name was up in 
electrics and when anyone mentions her 
wheat-cake juggling she gives them a 
frozen stare. 

The Mystery of Mary 

Dut for every Susie and Rosie and Gwen- 
dolyn and Priscilla and May and Min- 
nie, there is a Mary Jones. Mary had a 
figure that would make Paris forget Helen 
and her hair was so fragrant and golden 
-that the bees mistook it for honey. Her 
eyes were like turquoises and her skin was 
as soft and pink as apple blossoms, and 
when she spoke it sounded as though her 
voice had captured the song of the night- 
ingale. 

Mary came of a family that had for 
generations been on the stage. At the 
age of sixteen she could act any part 
you might throw at her, from Little Eva 
to The Second Mrs. Tanqueray. And she 
had come to Hollywood with a firm belief 
in Santa Claus and that the movies were 
looking for players with beauty and abil- 
ity. It was just a matter, she knew, of 
finding the opportunity ; and finding that 
was just a matter of keeping at things and 
her spirits up. _ So she did. And what 
should happen one . day but the chance 
of chances : an interview with Mr. Blank- 
berg. 

As she sat in his private office she 
looked at the autographed pictures of 
Susie and Rosie and Gwendolyn and Pris- 
cilla and May and Minnie, all in ermine 
wraps and diamond bracelets, and she 
sighed a little as she twisted her feet 
around to hide the run in her stocking. 
Mr. Blankberg watched her for a minute 
or two with an oily smile ; then, clearing 
his throat somewhat pompously, he said, 
"You have such wonderful eyes." Mary 
laughed. "Oh, be your age," she said 
tartly. 

A year later, Mary Jones is still ma- 
neuvering her feet to hide the run in 
her stocking. There's the start of a run 
in her spirit now, though ; and she's won- 
dering what it is that she lacks in looks 
and talent that Susie and Rosie and Gwen- 
dolyn and May and Minnie have. For they 
must have it, she is sure. How else could 
they have arrived at where they are? 




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97 




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Hendrickson Photo 
Kansas is more noted for wheat fields than fishing-ponds, and Charles Rogers 
says he never in his life had a real opportunity to fish until he came to California 

What Becomes of Their Wedding Rings ? 

(Continued from page 45) 



wedding ring. Or, maybe, Jackie went 
over all the bills very carefully and found 
out it was her ring after all. 

Would Virginia Brown Faire part with 
her wedding ring? No, ma'am! Virginia 
is going to keep it forever. The separation 
of Virginia and Jack Daugherty is very 
recent. The imprint of the ring still shows 
on her finger. 

"When Jack put that ring on my hand," 
said Virginia, looking very pretty and 
rather wistful, "I said I would never take 
it off unless it meant the marriage was at 
an end. The day I left him and went 
home to my mother I slipped it off and 
packed it away with all the other sweet 
memories. I'll never wear it again. I 
think it is wrong to wear a token of your 
marriage vows when those vows no longer 
exist. But I wouldn't part with it for 
anything. It will always stand for a won- 
derful adventure in my life." 

With Marie Prevost, it is different. 
Marie's separation from Kenneth Harlan 
didn't interfere with her sense of humor. 
She takes life and matrimony with a 
grain of salt and a witty outlook. She's 
been married and divorced twice. But she 
saved both of her wedding rings. She 
has combined the two experiences — I 
mean, the two rings, and had them soldered 
together. It makes an attractive and un- 
usual ornament. When people notice it 
and inquire, Marie laughs, "Oh, those are 
my wedding rings." 

Leatrice Won't Tell 

f eatrice Joy has a sense of humor, too. 

' But not where matrimony is concerned. 

Jack Gilbert may have been a frivolous 



husband, but Leatrice refuses to take the 
experience lightly. She won't tell what 
she did with her wedding ring. "It's too 
personal and too intimate," she said. 

Florence Vidor felt the same way. Only 
more so. 

Constance Talmadge was out of town. I 
called up two people who knew Connie to 
ask about her wedding rings. They 
seemed surprised. "Oh, yes. She had 
been married, hadn't she?" No, they 
couldn't recall anything about the rings. I 
would have wired Constance, but some- 
thing told me she felt likewise. 

The fascinating Hedda Hopper remem- 
bered hers slightly. Hedda was busy with 
a luncheon party up at the Montmartre 
and she had to stop and think. Finally 
she remembered that she had lost it. "I 
paid for mine anyway," laughed Hedda. 
"I guess that's the reason I didn't feel so 
badly when it disappeared." 

One gets so vague on those points in 
Hollywood. 

The same day at the same cafe I saw 
Louise Brooks. That morning, her sep- 
aration from Eddie Sutherland had been 
announced. Louise looked wonderfully 
smart, as usual, but a little pensive, which 
wasn't so usual. As she passed my table 
I looked to see if the ring was there. Sure 
enough, it was ! I'm going to look again 
in a couple of months. 

Evelyn Brent was away on location, but 
she sent in word that she had lost hers. 
The wedding ring was stolen, along with 
other jewelry, in New York. No, she 
had never bothered to have it replaced. 
Girls in pictures can't wear wedding rings, 
anyway. 



98 



The Answer Man 

(Continued from page 80) 

BARRY AXD BETTY.— How's O. H. 
ten. Gary Cooper was born in Helena, 
Mont., May 7, 1901. Guess he has given 
up Western's for a while. You'll like him 
in "Lilac Time," starring Colleen Moore. 
Lane Chandler was born in Montana, June 
1. 1901, six feet two, weighs 185 pounds, 
reddish-brown hair and dark gray eyes. 
He was the chap who played opposite 
Clara Bow in "Red Hair." Write him at 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

H. L. G. — You bet I'd like to visit your 
town. Perhaps I will some day. Lawrence 
Gray was born July 27, 1900, and is not 
married. George Lewis is twenty-three 
and you can reach him at Universal Stu- 
dios, Universal City, Cal. Charles Rogers 
was born Aug. 3, 1904. Douglas Fair* 
banks, Jr., is about twenty-one. Margue- 
rite Clayton is in Europe appearing in 
pictures. Write William Desmond at the 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 



DOLORES COSTELLO FAN. — 
Myrna Loy is twenty -two, has red hair 
and light eyes. She's Scotch and Welsh de- 
scent, write Myrna at the Warner Bros. 
Studios, 5842 Sunset B ulevard, Holly- 
wood, Cal. Dolores was born in 1906, 
is five feet tall and weighs 108 pounds. 
Her latest picture is "Noah's Ark," 
George O'Brien plays opposite her. Write 
them at Warner Brothers also. Edmund 
Cobb is playing in "The Forest Rangers," 
a serial, consisting of twelve two-reelers. 
You refer to Mary Nolan who played in 
"Sorrell and Son," and Anna Q. Nilsson 
was the wife. 

VIRGIE— No, all the stars do not 
change their names on entering pictures. 
Richard Dix's real name is Ernest Brim- 
mer, not married, and his latest picture is 
"Warming Up." That's Clara Bow's real 
name; write her at Paramount Studios, 
5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. Nor- 
ma Shearer is married to Irving Thalberg 
and she stopped in to see us just before 
going to the Coast. Her latest picture is 
'•Ballyhoo." Write Jola Mendez at FBO 
Studios, 780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 

WINDBLOWN.— All the way from 
Brooklyn too. Alice White was Claire 
O'Reilly in "The American Beauty." Marie 
Prevost has the lead in "The Godless Girl." 
Write her at the De Mille Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. You know Marie is the only 
woman in Thomas Meighan's latest pic- 
ture, "The Racket," in production at the 
Caddo Production, United Artists Studios, 
7200 Santa Monica Boulevard, Hollywood, 
Cal. 

EAGER FANS— Always glad to hear 
from you. Allene Ray is married to Larry 
Wheeler. Write Ken Maynard at the 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 
Wallace MacDonald is directing for First 
Division Prod., 1440 N. Gower St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. Cullen Landis is married to 
Loca Hearne. Rex Lease is free-lancing. 
James Pierce played the part of Tarzan in 
"Tarzan and the Golden Lion." Ramon 
Novarro is single. Your watch is non- 
breakable? So was mine, till I broke it. 

MARGE.— Rex Lease was Tim Mc- 
Coy's brother in "The Law of the Range." 
You bet I can supply you with his photos. 
^ rite Gloria Gray at the Universal Stu- 
dios, Universal City, Cal. Conrad Nagel 



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99 




a 



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Curtis Biltmore 
If we had feet and ankles and legs like Julia Faye's, we would refuse to pose fo' 
a picture unless it showed our feet and ankles and legs 



has finally been selected to play opposite 
Greta Garbo in "War in the Dark." 
Katharine MacDonald, who was very popu- 
lar a few years ago and is still a favorite, 
was married a short time ago to Christian 
R. Holmes. 

A VERY REMARKABLE FELLOW— 
That's Charles Farrell's nickname, all 
right, and he is still a bachelor. James 
Hall and Ruth Taylor are playing in "Just 
Married." Lionel Barrymore, Kennneth 
Thompson, Maria Alba and Gladys Brock- 
well in "The Joy Street," being directed 
by Irving Cummings for Fox. Write 
Gladys Brockwell at 1401 No. Western 
Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. Lois Wilson has 
signed with FBO Studios, 780 Gower St., 
Hollywood, Cal. Your letter will reach 
her there. 

M. M. S.— William Bakewell was the 
chap in "West Point." Cullen Landis was 
born July 29, 1895. James Murray, 
February 9, 1901 ; he has light hair and 
green eyes. Address your letter to him 
at the Metro-Goldwvn Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. James Hall, October 22, 1900, 
brown hair and blue eyes. Jack Luden in 
1902 and he's single. Joan Crawford and 
Dorothy Sebastian have the leads in "Danc- 
ing Daughters." Evelyn Brent, Adolphe 
Menjou and Nora Lane in "A Night of 
Mystery." Speaking of crime waves, 
Chicago seems to have got a permanent. 

JOANNE — Send along the other ques- 
tions, too. Eddie Tetherstone was Som- 
ers and Johnny Walker, Decatur, in "Old 
Ironsides." Nick Stuart's latest picture 



is "The River Pirate." Sally Phipps's "The 
News Parade." You may write Jeanette 
Loff, Sonia Karlov and Hugh Allen at the 
De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. Lane 
Chandler at Paramount Studios, 5451 
Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. Josephine 
Bori at Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western 
Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. George Bancroft's 
latest picture is "The Drag Net." 

ROACH.— Any relation to Hal Roach? 
You can reach Charles Rogers and Nancy 
Carroll at Paramount Studios, 5451 Mara- 
thon Street, Hollywood, Cal. Malcolm 
MacGregor played in "A Million Bid." 
Jason Robards in "Hills of Kentucky." 
Conrad Nagel was born March 16, 1897, 
and is married to Ruth Helm. Nancy 
Carroll has red hair. Write Jane Novak 
at First Division Pictures, 1440 N. Gower 
Street, Flollywood, Cal. 

THREE WISE FOOLS— James Murray 
was born Feb. 9, 1891, has light hair and 
green eyes, and is five feet eleven and 
one-half inches tall. His latest picture 
is "The Crowd"; he has not done any- 
thing since. He receives his fan mail 
at the Metro-Goldwyn Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. John Gilbert and Joan Craw- 
ford in "Four Walls." Gary Cooper 
was born May 7, 1901, Antonio Moreno 
and House Peters in 1888. Philippe De 
Lacey is ten years old. Jackie Coogan, 
Oct. 26, 1914; James Hall, Oct. 22, 1900. 

DABA AND ECRA.— The old custom 
of cutting notches in gunstocks has been 
applied to steering wheels now. Charles 
(Continued on page 111) 



100 




P. &A. 
Lili and her penguining smile : the Damita snapped aboard the Berengaria upon her 
arrival in New York, coastward bound 

Paris: Cherbourg, 10:46 

(Continued from page 72) 



At the platform, she was greeted by a 
crowd of friends, arrived at the last 
instant, their arms filled with flowers and 
candy. She gathered these in — the train 
began slowly to pull out of St. Lazare — 
last minute good-byes were waved and 
shouted — everything was confusion and 
excitement for an instant — then ensued 
that perfect calm which comes immediately 
after the departure of a train from a 
station. 

Sudden agitation again! Mile. Damita, 
desolated, turns to us : "Where is my 
mother?" 

Instantly we would have sacrificed ten 
years of our life to have been able to pro- 
duce her parent out of our upper left 
hand vest-pocket — but what could we do? 

Into the compartment she raced — low- 
ered the window — leaned far out, despite 
the sign on the sill, "It is dangerous to 
hang one's self on the outside." No mother 
in sight. She sat down, overwhelmed. 

We introduced ourselves, and sat down 
also, as the train picked up speed. 

Then she explained that her mother, who 
was to travel to America with her, had 
missed the train. Still a chance that she 
might have caught the second section, in 
which case she will reach Cherbourg be- 
fore the boat leaves. 

As we settled down for the six hour 
journey, we had time for a more leisurely 
analysis— even regular features; very light 



brown hair ; very dark brown eyes, spark- 
ling and animated ; full, expressive mouth. 
But her greatest charm is the fluent ex- 
pressiveness of her face — going in an in- 
stant from poignant concern to radiant joy, 
from joy to pensive doubt, from doubt to 
coquetry, from coquetry to placid calm, 
from calm to bubbling animation — ever 
mobile, ever changing. 

"And now," we said, mustering our best 
French (and what French!), "tell us some- 
thing about yourself." 

"Please," she begged, "do not write the 
interview which says ; Lili Damita was 
born at so-and-so, she went to school at 
such-and-such, her first film was thus-and- 
so . . . Write something original, some- 
thing bizarre." 

Originality by Command 

Co here we are, between the devil and the 
. deep sea. Being original by request 
is like trying to be funny to order. What 
to write that will be different? We'll 
think of something dazzlingly clever to- 
morrow morning while shaving (we al- 
ways do) after this has been sent off and 
it's too late. 

But — it occurs to us, after piecing to- 
gether, bit by bit, the story of Lili 
Damita's career, we know of nothing more 
original, more unusual, more bizarre, than 
the true account of her screen career. 





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102 




Richee 
Ruth Taylor likes her Fourth of July quite unsafe and entirely insane. She 
intends to shoot off everything from skyrockets to baby cannon crackers 



For what other European star, sought 
after for two years by every large com- 
pany in America, has regularly turned 
down all such offers ? But to start at the 
beginning : 

Once upon a time (now, there's an 
original beginning for you!) a little girl 
was born in Paris — city of beautiful wo- 
men, where feminine loveliness is valued 
above all else. When she was two, her 
family removed to Bordeaux, and there 
she grew up, her loveliness increasing day 
by day. 

It was inevitable that she should go on 
the stage, and back to her beloved Paris 
she came, to dance for three years at the 
Opera. Then musical productions, and 
increasing prominence. 

Then, at an age when most girls are still 
in school, this youngster trouped off to 
Vienna, to dance in a musical production. 

The fairy godmother who so far had 
followed her faithfully was also in Vienna, 
for she was seen on the stage by the head 
of the Sascha film company, Austria's 
leading picture company. He offered her 
a small role in a picture being made. She 
refused it. (You asked for the original, 
Mile. Damita — if that isn't original, we 
don't know what is ! ) 

Back to Paris she came, to dance at the 
Theatre des Capucines. And here, one day, 
came the head of the Sascha company, to 
offer her the star role in a film. Still in 
her mid-teens, without screen experience, 
without dramatic stage experience — and of- 
fered the star part ! What girl could re- 
fuse? So back to Vienna she went. 

Steps to Success in "Red Heels" 

""The executive's associates protested. The 
thing was unheard of ! But he was 
adamant, confident that the girl had the 
makings of a great star. "We will make 
one film," he said. "If it succeeds, well 



and good; if it fails, I myself will under- 
write the loss." 

And so she made "The Plaything of 
Montmartre," released in England as "Red 
Heels." It was directed by Michael Ker- 
tesz, now in America, where he wisely 
spells his name Courtice. The picture had 
its good points and its bad — but concern- 
ing the overnight success of the star there 
could be no question. 

She was signed to do four more pic- 
tures ; then four more again. 

And her fame began to go far and wide 
— and reached the ears of certain execu- 
tives in New York, ever on the alert for 
new stars. One after another they visited 
her, in Paris, in Berlin, in London — where- 
ever she happened to be at the moment. 
And one and all, they came away without 
her name on a contract. (You wanted 
something original? You have it — and 
how !) 

They wanted long contracts — her own 
still had some time to run — and who knew 
what the future would bring ! She liked 
Europe. There she would stay. 

And on a day less than four years after 
that first offer in Vienna, Samuel Goldwyn 
came to Paris, determined to return to 
America with a contract bearing the magic 
signature. 

Mr. Goldwyn (his luck is proverbial) 
arrived in Paris the very day that her 
German contract expired, and she was ne- 
gotiating for another. 

No for an Answer 

""V^ 0ULD y . ou '" he said, "like to come to 
America and star in Samuel Gold- 
wyn productions ?" 

"No," she replied, thereby probably giv- 
ing Mr. Goldwyn the shock of his career. 

"But why?" 

She explained. She was satisfied where 



/ 



she was ; her position in Europe was as- 
sured ; in America — who knew ? 

Then Mr. Goldwyn displayed that rare 
judgment that has been the secret of his 
success. 

"Come to America for one picture," he 
proposed. "Then, if you are not happy, 
you can return to Europe. But if you like 
Hollywood, we can discuss further ar- 
rangements." 

She capitulated — signed the contract — 
and thus it was, on a soft, gray day in May 
that we found ourself riding across the 
lovely Brittany countryside with this same 
little girl — for there you have "the true 
and authentic" story of Lili Damita. Why 
seek further for originality, for the un- 
usual, for the bizarre ? You have it. 

Cherbourg, Aboard the Berengaria. 

P. S. While we were waiting in the cus- 
toms room, Mile. Damita's mother arrived, 
having just caught the second section of 
the train as it left the station — so all is 
again serene. 

And Mile. Damita, after reading over 
the foregoing, asks me to add that she is 
very, very happy to have Ronald Colman 
as her partner in her first American film. 

Hardly had she given utterance to this 
opinion than she found herself involved in 
a struggle with Mr. Will Hays. The com- 
bat was of a floral nature, each seeking to 
outdo one another in a bouquet-casting 
contest. As for the outcome, that you 
must judge for yourself. We merely re- 
port the conversation round by round : 
Mr. Hays remarked to Mile. Damita on 
the platform : "If you are as talented 
as you are beautiful, then America is very, 
very lucky." To which she gallantly re- 
plied : "Mr. Hays, the good fortune is all 
mine in traveling to America on the same 
boat with one of the great men in 
America." 




Greta Granstedt, comparatively new to the 

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Better Than He Expected 

(Continued from page 42) 



hi 



is eye on i 



wood, from the looks of the thing. Hav- 
ing been commended to him by mutual 
friends in England as one of the world's 
more convivial souls, I wondered what was 
behind this strange air of semi-boredom. 
He had been in Hollywood almost a 
month. 

He made a supreme effort at an Im- 
pression of Our City. "To tell you the 
truth," he said, "I had been told so many 
queer things about Hollywood that on the 
whole I suppose you can put me down as 
pleasantly surprised. Before I left I made 
up my mind not to be astonished by any- 
thing, even if it was a naked black man 
walking down the boulevard with his body 
painted." 

It occurred to me that Mr. Byron had 
better not get temperamental once too often 
in Sam Goldwyn's office or that is just the 
kind of thing he will see. 

The almost complete unevent fulness of 
Walter Byron's first month in Hollywood 
is an illuminating commentary on motion 
picture "society." 

One might, perhaps, have expected any- 
body coming to Hollywood under such 
conditions, let alone a charming fellow 
and good mixer like Byron, to be received 
with open arms and taken to the hearts of 
the movie crowd in an interminable series 
of parties. Colman and Banky had sepa- 
rated as a screen team, Sam Goldwyn had 
gone abroad in search of successors for 
them as leading woman and leading man, 
respectively. The news came that Walter 
Butler, one of the most prominent English 
screen juveniles, had been signed to play 
opposite Vilma Banky in "The Innocent," 
his name being changed by Goldwyn to the 
more "romantic" Byron. 

From Butler to Byron 

HT he manner of his signing was this: 
When Goldwyn was about to leave 
London, acknowledging his search a fail- 
ure, he met Ronald Colman, who was also 



in London at the time, and Ronald casually 
mentioned Butler as a possibility. Walter 
went to Goldwyn's suite at the Carlton 
Hotel and produced some photographs 
which did not impress Goldwyn. It was 
Mrs. Goldwyn, the former Frances How- 
ard, who saw the possibilities in Walter, 
and Goldwyn was finally convinced by her 
and by Walter's brightness in having 
brought along a mustache in his pocket in 
order to show how he looked, both with it 
and without. Walter became Byron and 
was signed on a six-months' contract with 
options, at exactly the same salary he was 
then receiving in English pictures. He did 
not see Goldwyn again until he reached 
Hollywood. Colman he had only met 
once — for half an hour in a Piccadilly 
actors' club bar — just long enough for 
Ronald to carry away an impression of his 
screen qualities. 

If Walter thought he was bound for an 
El Dorado when he left hurriedly for 
Hollywood, he was soon disillusioned. In 
New York he was told by the Goldwyn 
representatives that a lower had been re- 
served for him on the Los Angeles train. 
Walter, knowing nothing of American 
travel conditions, was informed that 
Ronald Colman always traveled in a lower 
and therefore felt assured that it must be 
all right. As soon as he got to Chicago, 
he cancelled his berth the rest of the way 
and took a compartment. 

Arriving in Hollywood early in the 
morning, Walter was at Goldwyn's studio 
by eleven o'clock. Everything was very 
businesslike. Walter was launched imme- 
diately on a series of tests for acting, 
wardrobe and photographic points. 

If He Succeeds, They'll Like Hini 

1_Ie took a room at the Hollywood Ath- 
letic Club, and, walking daily to and 
from the studio, spent the best part of a 
month in this way. There had been no 
(Continued on page 117) 



104 



X 




She Knows Her Orchids 

{Continued from page 67) 



ig for a particularly exotic perfume bottle 
nth a gold crown for a stopper. "But we 
^ere such babes-in-the-wood, we thought 
he thirty dollars we had saved would last 
forever. It lasted about as far as the State 
of Massachusetts, and one morning we 
woke up to find ourselves stranded. We 
were so broke we couldn't even spare the 
two cents to write a letter home." She 
interrupted with an impatient, "Oh, clear." 
It is so. difficult to pack perfume bottles. 

Pie for Dinner — Pie for Breakfast 

Phere was a fellow who ran a lunch 
wagon who used to feed us because 
he felt sorry for us, I guess. The com- 
pulsory diet may have been great for our 
figures, but it was certainly hard on our 
stomach. We ate pie for breakfast, lunch 
and dinner. That was the lunch wagon 
specialty. Now 'and then he used to get 
big-hearted and scramble an egg for us," 
Jane laughed. "But that was only if he had 
done an exceptionally good day's business." 

All one summer they stayed in the 
little Massachusetts town, starving but 
happy. Jane says she gets fan letters now 
and then from that town, telling her that 
somebody there thinks she is the most 
luxurious and elegant person on the 
screen. And five years ago they could 



have done her a big favor by inviting her 
to a square meal ! Life's funny. 

When winter came on, things didn't go 
so well. Jane's chum got cold feet, lit- 
erally, and deserted the other vagabond 
to return to the home fires. Jane's feet 
were equally cold, but her spirit was un- 
daunted. She worked at odd jobs until 
she got enough money to push on to New 
York. 

The original story of The Little Girl 
All Alone in the Big City had nothing on 
Jane for tough luck during that first year 
in New York. It is hard to realize that 
the beautifully marceled and manicured 
Jane used to cook her own breakfasts 
over a gas jet — when she was lucky 
enough to have anything to cook. She 
lived in a little back-room with a cement 
floor and wrote letters by candle-light at 
night because she didn't have enough 
money to buy an electric-light bulb. Her 
wardrobe consisted of one black dress that 
she washed with soap because she could 
not afford to have it cleaned. Heaven 
may protect the working girl, but Jane 
would like to know who looks after the 
gals out of work. Flabby-lipped gentle- 
men made unflattering proposals to her. 
Floor-walkers hinted that they could get 
jobs for her if she would care to have 
(Continued on page 118) 







There was a time when Jane Winton was so broke she couldn't afford an electric 

light bulb. Now picture-makers are going bankrupt in the attempt to buy enough 

globes to give her name proper publicity 






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Flora Bramley and her smile came over from London in time to get themselves chosen 
one of the 1928 Wampas babies 



In and Out of Focus 

{Continued from page 39) 



]\£AE MURRAY is again in court, 

this time sued by a masseuse who 
claims that the Murray figure was all 
due to her. And in support of her con- 
tention she exhibits a photograph of 
Mae inscribed across one corner with 
the masseuse's name and the lyric out- 
burst, "Thank God for your divine 
hands." 

JN court Mae testified that Jack Dono- 
van cheated her on the furnishings 
of the house she bought from him. 
Nothing was as it should have been; 
even the washing-machine wouldn't 
work. "Not," said Mae hurriedly to 
the jury, "that I have ever tried to run 
a washing-machine myself, you under- 
stand." The court looked at her and 
nodded. Her reputation was saved. 

npWO months ago Buster Collier was 

interviewed for Motion Picture 
Magazine. He unwisely made this re- 
mark, "You find me the girl and I'll 
marry her." Naturally, that was just 
asking for trouble and Buster got it. 
He has been deluged with letters, tele- 
grams and photographs of girls who 
would like to be found. We would 
suggest as the only solution for Bus- 
ter's problem, a contest in which all 
the young ladies of the U. S. are in- 
vited to submit photographs and a re- 



liable jury will pick one whom Buster 
will agree to marry. 

"yyALTER BYRON, the new Sam 

Goldwyn leading man, relates this 
evidence of the British sense of pro- 
priet}?-. He was wandering about the 
lot of the British International Films, 
the largest studio in England, with the 
publicity man of the organization. 
Presently they came upon a stage 
where Syd Chaplin was working. 

"Oh, is that Syd Chaplin?" exclaimed 
Walter, "I've always wanted to meet 
him. Introduce me, won't you, old 
chap?" 

The publicity man looked shocked. 
"I'd be awfully glad to do it, old 
thing," he explained, "but you see, I 
really can't. / haven't been introduced 
to him myself!" 

UNITED ARTISTS has discovered a 
real Mcrfon of the movies. A few 
days ago a prop man discovered a 
starved-looking boy eating a bunch of 
raw carrots used on a set. Question- 
ing him, he found that for two weeks 
the boy had been living on the lot, 
sleeping first on one set then on an- 
other, eating whatever scraps of food 
he could find. In the daytime he 
worked with the engineers laying a 
pipe line across the lot, or in the dif- 



ferent departments. Everyone saw 
him, but took it for granted someone 
else had hired him. The boy had 
walked to the shore from the interior 
of Alaska, stowed away on a boat and 
walked from San Francisco to Holly- 
wood in order to get onto a movie lot, 
which he did by way of the back fence! 

THE small daughter of Scoop Con- 
Ion, publicity writer, is something 
of a golf orphan. Her mother is always 
away at the links improving her stance 
or her stroke or something of the sort. 
The other day the little girl was in- 
terviewing her grandmother on the 
subject of her own arrival in the 
world. 

"Who was the first one to see me 
when I was born?" she demanded. 

"I think it must have been the Doc- 
tor," her grandmother replied, "and 
after that your father and I saw you." 
The little girl looked exasperated. 
"Don't tell me my mother was off 
playing golf that day, too," she ex- 
claimed bitterly. 

gID GRAUMAN does know the value 
of showmanship, and everything is 
grist that comes to his mill. The other 
night he arranged for his nightwatch- 
raan to be married on the stage, with 
the Fanchon and March girls holding 
the bride's train! At the conclusion of 
the ceremony the bride went down to 
the footlights and threw her bouquet 
into the audience while everyone gave 
her a big hand. Whether the marriage 
is repeated twice nightly and three 
times on Sundays and holidays isn't 
stated. 

"J^OW is the time for all good men 
to come to our aid with a party," 
is the Hollywood extra girl's version. 

"PAUL RALLI, the handsome young 

Greek who has been knocking at 

the gates of Hollvwood for the last 




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107 



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108 





It's obvious that Ethlyne Ciair has gone Western. But if she doesn't watch what she': 
about with that firecracker, she's likely to go west into the bargain 



ten months, was telling me about, his 
first real part. "It's really a very 
good part," he explained eagerly, "you 
might say that 1 am practically the 
star of the picture." 

"Good!" said we, "and who's your 
leading lady?" 

"Oh," said Paul, earnestly. "She's 
Marion Davies!" 

LEW CODY and Ralph Spence, title 
writer for Metro-Goldwyn, had an 
argument the other night about which 
one could make the best sodas. Both 
had worked behind the fountain coun- 
ter in drug stores in their youth. Lew's 
father was a druggist in backwoods 
Maine, by the way. To settle the dis- 
cussion, they agreed to spend the noon 
hours behind the soda fountain in a 
big downtown drug store and let the 
public decide. It was accordingly ad- 
vertised in the papers and the streets 
of downtown Los Angeles became im- 
passable at ten o'clock in the morning. 
The result was expressed thus poeti- 
cally in an evening paper. 

"Can Ralph Spence dispense sody? 
Not like Lew Cody." 

LILI DAMITA is the latest Sam 
Goldwyn import. We hear she is a 
Paris blonde, whatever that is. Mean- 
while Camilla Horn has departed Eu- 
ropeward. It seems she left a very new 
husband in Berlin when she came to 
play John Barrymore's leading woman. 

RICHARD DIX and his double both 

lay at the point of death at the 

same time this last month, and from 



a similar cause. Richard suffered a re- 
lapse after an operation for appendi- 
citis. His double was ill with an in- 
fection following an operation. The 
double died. Richard is getting bet- 
ter. 

^fE met Bull Montana socially for 
the first time the other evening at 
a party. We were just coming, he 
was just leaving. "Aren't you going 
to stay for supper?" we asked. Bull 
made a deep bow, "Lady," said he, in 
his most elegant manner, "I have al- 
ready et." The Bull recently went into 
court to ask protection from Mrs. Mon- 
tana, a small lady who, nevertheless — 
according to Bull — swings a mean slip- 
per. 

"pWEN the studios have pet names 
now. Call up Tiffany-Stahl any 
day and you will hear the telephone 
girl's dulcet tones reply, "This is 
Tiffy!" 

J^MIL JANNINGS and Florence Vi- 

dor struck up a delightful friend- 
ship when they played together in 
"High Treason." He called her, al- 
ways, "My good Florence." In ont 
of their scenes Jannings, as the 
mad emperor, unshaven, dirty, with 
tousled hair and greasy clothes, was 
supposed to make love to the lovely 
patrician of his court. To the amaze- 
ment of Lubitsch, his star appeared on 
the set freshly shaved, in a new uni- 
form. "But, Ernst," said Jannings 
firmly when the director expostulated, 
"I cannot make love to my good Flor- 






ence looking like that!" It was only 
■when Florence herself intervened and 
assured Emil that she would' not hold 
his disheveled appearance against him, 
but would understand that it was all 
for Art. 

'"pHERE is generosity in high places, 
as George Bancroft proves. "Are 
you going to have Evelyn Brent as 
leading lady in your next picture?" 
someone asked him the other day. 
"No," said George, "she's been my 
leading lady twice. Now I'm going to 
give some other girl her chance!" 

'pHE best caption of the month goes 
to the "Jazz Singer." "God Made Her 
a Woman," it reads, "But Love Made 
Her a Mother." 

"]V1 ^ *^ ea °^ being rich," said Dor- 
othy Reid to me the other day, 
"is to be able to afford a nervous break- 
down!" 

PRANK CURRIER, famous charac- 
ter actor, died this last month. He 
had been under contract to Metro pic- 
tures, and afterward to Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Meyer for many years and was 
regarded as the dean of the screen. 
He is said to have discovered Julia 
Marlowe when he was a young actor 
on Broadway. 

"QYNICS," says Joe Farnum, title 
writer at Metro, "say that a man 
looks twice only at one-third of the 
women he sees, the lower third." 

^ND now Estelle and Jack are going 
to be Belasco stars and play on 
Broadway. Their play has been ten- 
tatively titled "The Big Fight" and 
in it Jack will play a prize-fighter, a 
role that ought to be easy for him be- 
cause Mr. Dempsey, as old timers may 
remember, was once quite prominent 
in the ring. 




Sally Blane is beckoning to you to come and 

look at the outfit she wears in "The Vanishing 

Pioneer." The fitting background is Utah's 

"Dixieland," where she is on location 



Let Us Give You 

This Picture 

"V^OU have often wished that you had a frame 
•*- for your favorite's picture. Well, here is 
your opportunity to get what you want. 

As a special gift to you, we will send you, with 
a one-year subscription to MOTION PIC- 
TURE MAGAZINE or MOTION PICTURE 
CLASSIC one beautifully finished 8 x 10-inch 
photograph of . your favorite star (selected from 
the list of stars below) mounted in a very attrac- 
tive art frame with easel. 

The easel is made of a special compressed board 
and is finished in a very pretty shade of silver 
gray ; it is 14 inches high and 9^4 inches wide ; 
standing on your dressing table, it will add to the 
charm of your room. 

The picture of your favorite in the art easel will be mailed to you securely 

packed so as to reach you promptly in good condition. 




Alice White 



ACTRESSES 

Adoree, Renee 
Astor, Mary 

Banky, Vilma 
Iiasquette, Lina 
Beebe, Marjorie 
Bellamy, Madge 
Borden, Olive 
Bow, Clara 
Brent, Evelyn 
Brian, Mary 
Bronson, Betty 
Brooks, Louise 

Carol, Sue 
Carroll, Nancy 
Collyer, June 
Claire, Etheiyne 
Corda, Maria 
Costello, Dolores 

Daniels, Bebe 
Davies, Marion 
Dana, Viola 
Day, Alice 
Day, .Marceline 
Del Rio, Dolores 
Dove, Billie 

Garbo, Greta 
Gaynor, Janet 
Gish, Dorothy 
Gish, Lillian 
Griffith, Corinne 

Joy, Leatrice 

Haver, Phyllis 

Kent, Barbara 
Kenyon, Doris 

La Plante, Laura 
Logan, Jacqueline 



Mackaill, Dorothy 
Marchal, Arlette 
McAvoy, May 
Moore, Colleen 
Moran, Lois 
Negri, Pola 
Nissen, Greta 

O'Day, Molly 
O'Neil, Sally 

Pickford, Mary 
Philbin, Mary 

Ralston, Esther 
Ray, Allene 
Reynolds, Vera 

Sebastian, Dorothy 
Starke, Pauline 
Shearer, Norma 
Southern, Eve 
Swanson, Gloria 

Talmadge, Constance 
Talmadge, Norma 
Taylor, Ruth 
Terry, Alice 

Valli, Virginia 
Velez, Lupe 
Vidor, Florence 

White, Alice 
Windsor, Claire 
Wray, Fay 

ACTORS 

Acord, Art 
Alvarado, Don 
Allen, Hugh 
Asther, Nils 

Barrymore, John 



Barthelmess, Richard 
Boyd, William 
Brook, Clive 
Brown, Johnny Mack 

Carewe, Arthur Edmund 
Chaney, Lon 
Chaplin, Charles 
Cody, Lew 
Colman, Ronald 
Collier, William, Jr. 
Coogan, Jackie 
Cooper, Gary 
Cortez, Ricardo 
Chandler, Lane 

De Lacey, Philippe 
Delaney, Charles 
D'Arcy, Roy 
Denny, Reginald 
Dix, Richard 

Fairbanks, Douglas 
Fairbanks, Douglas, Jr. 
Farrell, Charles 
Ford, Harrison 
Forbes, Ralph 

Gibson, Hoot 
Gilbert, John 
Gray, Lawrence 

Haines, William 
Hall, James 
Hamilton, Neil 
Hanson, Lars 
Harlan, Kenneth 
Holt, Jack 
Hoxie, Jack 
Hughes, Lloyd 

Jones, Buck 

Keane, Raymond 
Keith, Donald 



Kerry, Norman 
Kent, Larry 

Landis, Cullen 
La Rocque, Rod 
Lease, Rex 
Lewis, George 
Lyon, Ben 

McLaglen, Victor 
Meighan, Thomas 
Menjou, Adolphe 
Maynard, Ken 
Miller, Walter 
Mix, Tom 
Mix, Tom, and his 

horse Tony 
Moreno, Antonio 
Mulhall, Jack 

Nagel, Conrad 
Norton, Barry 
Novarro, Ramon 

O'Brien, George 

Petrovich, Ivan 
Pidgeon, Walter 

Reed, Donald 
Rogers, Charles 
Roland, Gilbert 

Steele, Bob 
Stone, Lewis 
Stuart, Nick 
Striker, Joseph 
Sills, Milton 

Thomson, Fred 
Tyler, Tom 
Tearle, Conway 

Valentino, Rudolph 
Varconi, Victor 







Coi 






































8M. 


P. 


MOTION 


PICTURE PUBLICATIONS, 


INC. 












1501 Broadway, New York 














For th 
of 


: enclosed $2.50 please send me Art 


Easel and Photograph 










! and enter my subscription to ^ 0TI0N Picture 

J * Motion Picture 


Magazine , , , u ■ \ c 
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issue. 




Include 50 cents extra postage for Canada 
Include one dollar extra postage for forei 


gn i 



109 



seedy 
skin 




jS/Lotorinq is 

great fun — Hut. . . 



After the dust and 

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out of sorts — chafed — dry — unhappy. 

Before that outing, call upon Frostilla! Rub 
it gently into the skin. Just a dozen drops 
of prevention — your perfect insurance 
against that *z/ter-smart and irritation. 

And if wind and sun have already played 
their irritating pranks — Frostilla will 
quickly soothe, cool and satinize that fe- 
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irking weather troubles. Carry a bottle 
in your car — that's a good idea ! 

Sold at all drug and department stores in 
those trim blue-labeled bottles, 50c and $1. 

The Frostilla Company, Elmira, New York 
Sales Representatives: Harold F. Ritchie & Co., Inc. 
Madison Avenue at 34th Street, New York City 



FROSTILLA 

for 

exposed and 
irritate d skin 

110 




Willy and Gussie Petersen-Fagerstam have, in addition to their other achievements in the 
motion picture life, left their Denmark upon the landscape surrounding Hollywood. They 
have, virtually with their own hands, built a house taken so literally from the Scandinavian 
style as to give the impression that it had been moved bodily from Copenhagen. As for 
their automobile, they have one. They were not asked what make of car it was; it was 
taken for granted that it would be a Fjord 

The Crown Jewels of Hollywood 

(Continued from page 41) 



In the smarter set, they change the jewelry 
with the seasons, as in America. And 
Paris is supposed to set the styles. It is 
not so. Hollywood is where jewelry 
styles are made and then Paris takes the 
credit." 

It was Willy who originated the slave 
bracelet for ankles. 

He Invented Slave Anklets 

Debe Daniels was the first girl in motion 
picture circles to wear one. Did it 
make Willy rich and famous ? Is his 
name whispered in awed tones at mission- 
ary meetings and the League of Nations? 
It is not. He didn't patent the idea. And 
if all the slave anklets worn were placed 
end to end, they would cause several di- 
vorce suits. 

The diamond-encrusted finger-watch. 
That, too, is a Petersen creation, for which 
no glory is shed on Willy. 

Despite these apparent financial cata- 
clysms, Willy is doing well for himself 
and Gussie. He is soon to build a business 
block in North Hollywood. He and 
Gussie are working, bit by bit, on their 
own residence in the center of the once- 
barren little two-acre plot that they 
bought on the instalment plan when they 
arrived in the West five years ago, prac- 
tically broke. They had walked from New 
York to Chicago, where Gussie persuaded 
Willy, because of ill-health, to ride to the 
Coast. She would walk. She did, and it 
took her nine weeks to do it. 

"I used to do this kind of work when I 
was a boy," unfolding a paper of tiny oval 
miniatures that he had imported for period 
jewelry. "But my eyes can't stand it any 
more, working twelve and fourteen hours 
as I do when a studio gives a rush order." 
He looked regretfully at the delicate 
pastels of a tiny porcelain lady. 



Hand-Carved Happiness 

"There is time, however, to build a six- 
room bouse, room by room, and carve 
a heavy dining-room table, with bench to 
match; to paint a landscape for the living- 
room ; to design a fireplace of brick and 
masonry ; and form a cement pool for a 
little spring that runs into the living-room 
to the left of the fireplace. Gussie and 
Willy have been working on this house 
for eight months. 

Rubies While You Wait 

"VY^illy is thirty-one. Four years ago a 
Paramount technical director, in a 
frenzy to have some crown jewels dupli- 
cated for a film, discovered Willy at work 
in a Hollywood Boulevard shop. From 
the time he delivered the finished work, 
carefully, painstakingly, artfully done, his 
success was assured. 

There have been imitators. But they do 
not last long. 

"They go to the ten-cent stores," says 
Willy, "and buy a handful of buckles, 
string them together with solder and tell 
the producers that it is genuine Renais- 
sance. 'It is good enough for the movies,' 
they tell each other. And that is where 
they make their mistake." 

This is because, while the materials 
which go to make the jewels of the House 
of Petersen-Fagerstam are of no particu- 
lar value, the material which goes into 
their design is, for that is Willy's art. 
One may buy a sheet of paper and a stick 
of charcoal for a very few cents indeed. 
But not over the counter at the five-and- 
ten can one buy such a drawing as an 
artist of merit can make with them. 

Come day Willy is going to have to pay 
super-tax. And that will be chiefly 
because he knows his carats. 



The Answer Man 

(Continued from page 100) 

Farrell was born in East Walpole, Mass., 
-twenty-three years ago, six feet tall, brown 
hair and blue eyes. He's still single. Janet 
Gaynor has been playing in pictures about 
two and a half years. Her latest picture is 
"The 4 Devils." Ramon Novarro's real 
name is Samaniegos. 

JUST EVELYN— Billie Dove was born 
May 14, 1903, and is married to Irvin 
Willat. Her latest picture is "The Yel- 
low Lily." Ramon Novarro, born Feb. 6, 
1899; Larry Kent, Sept. 15, 1900, is single, 
and you can reach him at First National 
Studios, Burbank, Cal. A galleass is a 
large armed galley, with three masts 
and fifteen oars or more on each side, 
used formerly on the Mediterranean. 

MOLLY G.— Gosh! Oh, Golly. How's 
Palmyra? The picture you are referring 
to, starring Billie Dove and Gilbert Roland, 
was released as "The Love Mart."_ Lois 
Moran and Gwen Lee were the girls in 
"Sharp Shooters." Olive Borden is not 
married. Write Charles Farrell at Fox 
Studios, 1401 Xo. Western Avenue, Los 
Angeles, Cal. David and Ernest Torrence 
are brothers. Yes, I know how high is up. 

KAY — A gambeson is an old-time de- 
fensive coat of leather or cloth stuffed and 
quilted. You can write "Our Gang" at the 
Hal Roach Studios, Culver City, Cal. Ruth 
Taylor was born in Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Her latest picture is "Just Married." Gil- 
bert Roland is twenty-four years old, 
Buddy Rogers, Aug. 3, 1904. They're both 
single. 

A HAIXES FAX.— William Haines 
was born in Staunton, Va., January 1, 

1901. Yep, he is a bachelor. His latest 
picture is "Excess Baggage." Write Bill 
at Metro-Goldwyn Studios, Culver City, 
Cal. Marian Nixon was born in Superior, 
Wis. That's her real name and she is not 
married. A samisen is a Japanese guitar- 
like instrument with three strings, played 
with a plectrum. Don't you wish you could 
play one? 

HELEN — No, Eve never had the pleas- 
ure of meeting Olive Borden. But I have 
met John Gilbert, and he is just as nice off 
the screen as on. Conrad Nagel attended 
Highland Park College of Des Moines, 
Ind. Gerald Fielding was Batouche in 
"The Garden of Allah." Lois Moran, Vic- 
tor McLaglen, Nick Stuart have the leads 
in "The River Pirate." Betty Bronson's 
adopted sister has changed her name to 
Eleanor Ames and is playing an extra in 
"The Battle of the Sexes." 

B. V. W. G. — Mary Astor and Gertrude 
Astor are not related. Mary's real name 
is Lucille Langhanke, Gertrude's is Eyster. 
Write Bob Custer at FBO Studio, 780 
Gower Street, Hollywood, Cal. Fred 
Thomson was born in Montreal, Can., and 
he weighs 165 pounds. Ruth and Estelle 
are not sisters. Charles Rogers weighs 165 
pounds. Harry Langdon is five feet six 
and weighs 150 pounds. Write Harry at 
First Xational Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

EVE — Richard Talmadge is not playing 
in any picture at this writing. His. real 
name is Metzetti. Barry Norton is not 
married. Vilma Banky was born Jan. 9, 

1902, and her latest picture is "The 
Awakening." Ricardo Cortez was born 
September 19, 1889; you can reach him at 
Columbia Studios, 1408 Gower St., Holly- 



©IPIPOK'TILJNTTY MAEIEf 



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Make $1,000 Before Christmas selling exclusive 
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HELP WANTED 



We pay !)>1.20 dozen, sewing bungalow aprons 

at home. Spare time. Thread furnished. No 
button holes. Send Stamp. Cedar Garment Fac- 
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HELP WANTED— FEMALE 

Ladies Earn $6-?18 a Dozen decorating Pillow 
Tops at Home; experience unnecessary. Par- 
ticulars for stamp. Tapestry PaiDt Co., 126, 
LaGrange, Ind. 

Homework: Women wanting, obtain reliable 
kinds. Write for information. Enclose addressed, 
stamped envelope. Eller Co., Dept. 26, 29G Broad- 
way, New York. 

WOMEN — Spare time, $35 week. Wonderful 
Sanitary Belt-Protector. FREE SAMPLE for 
yourself. Easetex, 68 West Austin, Chicago. 

Ladies — Address Envelopes at home. Spare, 
time. Experience unnecessary. Dignified 
work. $ 1 5 - $ 2 5 weekly easy. Send 2c stamp 
for particulars. Mazelle, Dept. BY, Gary, Ind. 

HELP WANTED— MALE 

MEN — does work in romantic, wealthy South 
America appeal to you? Fare and expenses paid. 
List free. South American Service Bureau, 14,600 
Alma, Detroit, Mich. 

HELP WANTED— MALE-FEMALE 

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HELP WANTED— INSTRUCTION 

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Reporting Institute, 960, Telephone Bldg., St. 
Louis, Mo. 



HELP WANTED— INSTRUCTION 



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revenue, mail carrier and outdoor positions : steady 
work, particulars free. Write Mokane Inst., Dept. 
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MEN — 18 — 45. $1700 — $'c700 year. Railway 
Postal Clerks. City Mail Carriers. Common 
education sufficient. Particulars with sample 
coaching — FREE. Franklin Institute, Dept. F77, 
Rochester, N. Y. 



PATENTS 



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basis. Patented or unpatented. In business 21 
years. Complete facilities. References. Write 
Adam Fisher Mfg. Co., 513 Enright Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 



Photographs of all motion picture stars. Size 

8 X ID inches, 25 cents eaeli — 5 for $1. The 

Answer Man. Motion Picture Magazine, 1501 
Broadway, New York. 



PHOTOPLAYS 



$1250 for a Photoplay story by an unknown 
writer and sold through our Sales Department. 
We revise, copyright and market. Located in the 
heart of the Motion Picture Industry. We know 
the demand. Established 1917. Postal brings 
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Successful Photoplays Bring Big Money. 

Send for "Successful Photoplays," our popular 
free book on successful writing and marketing. 
Successful Photoplays, Box 43, Des Moines, Iowa. 



RATES 



Thousands of readers carefully scan the 
advertisements in Motion Picture Magazine. 
Successful advertisers place their copy in this 
section every month. For rates write to 
Motion Picture Publications, Inc., 1501 Broad- 
way, N. Y. 



REDUCE 



A BOOKLET BY DR. DENSMORE 

on treatment for 

reduction of Corpulency 

will be mailed without 

. charge upon request to 

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STORIES WANTED 



Story ideas wanted for photoplays, magazines. 
Big demand. Accepted any form for revision, de- 
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Monica Bldg., Hollywood, California. 




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Real Photographs 

of any Motion Picture Star, size 8x10 inches. 
Twenty-five cents each, or five for One Dollar. 
New poses. All subjects. Send your list to- 
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THE ANSWER MAN 

Motion Picture Magazine 

1501 Broadway, New York 



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111 




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They say that Ruby McCoy is the prettiest red-haired girl in Southern California, 
but we ask you confidentially are you looking at her hair? 



wood, Cal. Why do they call it leap 
year? You've got to keep on the jump. 
Betty Blythe is playing in "War in the 
Dark." 

TOWN OF ARDMORE. — George 
O'Brien was born in California twenty- 
eight years ago. He is five feet eleven and 
weighs 176 pounds, light hair, and your 
letter will reach him at the Fox Studios, 
1401 N. Western Avenue, Los Angeles, 
Cal, Jane and Katharine Lee are appear- 
ing in vaudeville. They haven't done any- 
thing in pictures for a number of years. 
George Jessel is playing in "Ghetto." 
Write him at Warner Brothers Studios, 
5842 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, Cal. 

MARY ANN— Clara Bow was born in 
South Brooklyn. Write her at the Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. Molly O'Day has dark brown 
hair and dark hazel eyes. Her real name 
is Sue Noonan and you can reach her at 
the First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 
Dorothy Sebastian was born in Birming- 
ham, Ala. She's five feet three and weighs 
115 pounds; dark brown hair and hazel 
eyes. Latest picture is "Detectives." 

FREDDIE AND NORMAN.— You will 
have to send me your full names for a 
personal reply, the mailmen wouldn't 
know who Freddie and Norman were. Mary 
Astor was born in Quincy, 111., and is mar- 
ried to Kenneth Hawks. Fred Thomson 
was born in Canada. The Farnums are 
not playing in pictures. What size shoes 
do I wear? Why, thare are only two 
sizes, one I can get my feet into, and one 
I can't. 



BUDDY'S ADMIRER.— And still they 
come. Buddy was born Aug. 3, 1904; has 
black hair and eyes. Ramon Novarro was 
born Feb. 6, 1899, has black hair and eyes. 
Richard Barthelmess, May 6, 1895; brown 
hair and eyes. Charles Ray, March 15, 
1891; six feet tall, weighs 166 pounds, 
brown hair and eyes. Write Lillian Rich 
at Excellent Pictures, 729 Seventh Ave., 
New York City. Raymond McKee is 
playing in "Heart to Heart," starring 
Mary Astor. 

RANDOLPH E. B.— Allene Ray can 
be reached at the Pathe Studios, 4500 Sun- 
set Boulevard, Hollywood, Cal. Walter 
Miller was born in 1892. Ben Lyon, 
February 6, 1901. William Collier, Jr., 
is playing in "Tide of Empire." Address 
your letter to him at the Warner Brothers 
Studios, 5842 Sunset Boulevard, _ Holly- 
wood, Cal. Mary Brian is playing in "The 
Perfumed Trap." Richard Arlen, "Ladies 
joi the Mob." Francis X. Bushman, Jr., 
and his sister Lenore are playing in vaude- 
ville. 

CURIOUS.— "The Noose," starring 
Richard Barthelmess, was written by H. H. 
Van Loan and Willard Mack. Madge 
Evans played opposite Richard in "Class- 
mates." Lloyd Hughes in "Three-Ring 
Marriage." Richard Barthelmess was mar- 
ried to Jessica Sargent a short time ago. 
Nigel de Brulier was Simonides in "Ben- 
Hur." Write Richard at First National 
Studios, Burbank, Cal. Leatrice Joy at 
DeMille Studios, Culver City, Cal. What 
are the speed laws in Mexico? Oh, about 
thirty revolutions per minute. Drop in 
again. 



112 




How would you like to have a playmate like Tim McCoy's? It's Wallaby, the 
kangaroo that played with him in "The Bushranger" 



BLONDY. — Cheer up,, with vacations 
and this lovely weather, how could you be 
blue. Richard Arlen is twenty-nine years 
old and married to Jobyna Ralston. Johnny 
Mack Brown is twenty-four, is married, 
but I don't know her name ; but, however, 
you can write Johnny at the Metro-Gold- 
wyn Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

JEANETTE.— Claire Windsor was born 
April 4, 1897, and you can write her at 
Columbia Studios, 1408 Gower St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. Jack Holt at Paramount Stu- 
dios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 
Lupe Velez, Joseph Schildkraut and Wil- 
liam Boyd at De Mille Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. Madeline Hurlock at Mack 
Sennett Studios, 1712 Glendale Blvd., 
Hollywood, Cal. Clive Brook is married 
and has two children. Mary Carr is play- 
ing in "Love Over Night," starring Rod 
La Rocque. Louise Dresser in "Mother 
Knows Best." Write her at Fox Studios, 
1401 No. Western Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 

RUSSEL, D. W.— Ben Turpin was born 
September 19, 1874, and is married to 
Babette Elizabeth Dietz. Betty Bronson 
is single. Allene Ray's latest picture is 
"The Yellow Cameo," a serial. Cyclone, 
the dog, and Edward Hearne play opposite. 

SELMA, ALA. — You neglected to give 
me your name, so I'm answering you 
through the column. Write Doris Dow- 
son at First National Studios, Burbank, 
Cal. Virginia Lee Corbin is playing in 
vaudeville. Mary Brian was born Feb. 17, 
1908, and her real name is Louise Dantz- 
ler. Francis McDonald, Harry T. Morey 
and William Powell are playing in "The 
Perfumed Trap." Write them at Para- 



mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. Clara Bow is playing in "The 
Fleet's In." 

JUST PLAIN CLARICE.— Look out, 
your sweetie might be jealous if he knew 
you were going to write William Collier, 
Jr., at the Warner Brothers Studios, 5842 
Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, Cal. Send 
me your name and address and I'll send 
you a complete list of the pictures I can 
supply. Esther Ralston is married to 
George Webb. Laura La Plante's real 
name is just that. She has a sister, Violet, 
who also plays in pictures. William Boyd 
is married to Elinor Faire. 

A PHILLY FAN— That's a great town. 
Gary Cooper was born May 7, 1901. He's 
single and his latest picture is "The First 
Kiss." Richard Arlen was born in Vir- 
ginia twenty-nine years ago. Yep! he is 
married to Jobyna Ralston. You can 
reach Ruth Taylor and Gary at Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. Nils Asther at Metro-Goldwyn 
Studios, Culver City, Cal. Ronald Colman 
is playing in "The Rescue" and Lili Da- 
mita is his new leading lady. Vilma Banky 
in "The Awakening." Greta Garbo was 
born in Sweden, twenty-five years ago. 

ETHEL — You refer to Jack Eagan, 
who played opposite Alice White in "The 
Big Noise." Sue Carol is playing in "The 
Air Circus." David Rollins and Arthur 
Lake play opposite her. Write Dorothy 
Revier at the Columbia Studios, 1408 
Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. Tom Mix 
and Tony at FBO Studios, 780 Gower St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

(Continued on page 120) 




Always at 
her best * * 

To be always "at one's best" ! . . . 
whatever else that may require of the 
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"Mum" is the true deodorant 
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And with the sanitary pad, the 
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welcome to the truly dainty woman. 

"Mum' ' is 3 5c and 60c at all stores. 

SPECIAL OFFER 

To introduce Ban, the remarkable 
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(50c per tube) we make a special offer 
in the coupon below. 



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113 



t*~*- 



Travel the <^^ 

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WHB 




D. & C. Steamers Guided by Radio Compass Signals 

To Lovers of Sea, Sky and 
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part of your vacation. 
We would be pleased to help you 
plan an outing of two, four, six 
or eight days' duration on the 
Lower Lakes, and supply you 
with pictures and descriptions 
of pleasant places: Niagara 
Falls, Mackinac Island, and 
others. 

If you contemplate an automo- 
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the journey by boat. Our over- 
night service between Buffalo 
and Detroit; Cleveland and 
Detroit, is used extensively by 
automobilists. If you desire a 
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A. A. SCHANTZ, President. 

^BLakeLines 



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extra. For the Chicago-Mackinac Isl- 
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trip, and include every expense on 
steamers: Buffalo to Mackinac' Island 
$49; to Chicago, $79. Cleveland to 
Mackinac Island, $41.50; to Chicago, 
$71.50. Detroit to Mackinac Island, 
$30: to Chicago, $60. Stopovers at 
Mackinac Island and other ports. For 
reservations, address E. H. McCracken, 
G. P. A., Detroit and Cleveland Navi- 
gation Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Fast freight service on all divisions at 
low rates. 




A star of the noisy, very noisy drama poses with a celebrity of a quieter form of enter- 
tainment: Beniamino Gigli, of the Metropolitan Opera, taken — we should say 
extremely taken — with Norma Talmadge 



Souls in Plaster 

{Continued from page 34) 



rapher ; odd, almost grotesque, studies 
with her curls pinned up and every young 
hollow and sharp angle unretouched. Fay 
came back from the studios shaking her 
head. "They don't want me like that, 
Bill," she said, "they want me pretty." 

Mortensen went to the most famous pho- 
tographer of the day, and made a bargain. 
He was to photograph Fay, curls, curves, 
complete, and in return Fay's guardian 
would paint his studio. The pretty pic- 
tures were made. But they were not, after 
all, to be the ones destined to win her her 
big chance at last. 

One day Von Stroheim was rummaging 
in the files, at Universal, and found the 
studies Mortensen had made. He asked 
the name of the big-eyed, sharp-boned 
child. "Nobody important," they told him. 
"She may be nobody now," said Von, "but 
some day she is going to be my leading 
woman !" And when he came to make 
"The Wedding March," he remembered, 
and sent for Fay Wray. 

Tears of Paint 

pWruNE has not come so swiftly to Wil- 
liam Mortensen, but that does not 
worry him. What would an artist do with 
a fortune anyway? He has had the hap- 
piness of seeing his dreams become — not 
flesh but tinted plaster. They were hang- 
ing in rows on the wall of his studio when 



I talked with him the other day. Masks ! 
Sphinx-like woman-faces, with haughty 
nostrils and carven lips, masks that 
scowled and writhed with obscene laughter, 
masks that leered like satyrs and masks 
that wept painted tears. 

The light in the bare room was blank 
and cheerless. A long-haired kitten played 
with her distorted shadow on the wall. 
The thin young man with the Basque cap 
took down one of the masks from above 
the workbench : 

"See, when you put them on — they come 
alive." 

Lon Chaney's most ambitious make-ups 
never produced such an effect of horror 
as that degenerate face with blood drooling 
from one corner of the gaping mouth, im- 
mobile above the capering body. On the 
wall it had been just a mask, now it was 
endowed with dreadful life, the life, not of 
a human being, but of debased humanity. 
As the head turned, the changing angles, 
and shift of shadows were like expressions. 

Another, a great, simpering vacuous 
moon face of all the silly coquettes of the 
world, smirking incongruously above his 
white sport shirt. 

William Mortensen, one-time Paris art 
student, formerly schoolmaster in the Salt 
Lake City high school, and now maker of 
masks for the movies, hung the smirking 
lady back on her nail. "You see," he re- 
peated, "they come alive. They are begin- 



114 



ning to use them in the pictures to do 
things that human faces can't. They will 
use them more and more." 

For four years Mortensen has been 
making faces for the studios. Most of 
them have never been seen. There was 
Ferdinand Pinney Earle's ill-fated "Rubai- 
yat," for which he created grotesque masks 
with mobile mouths that mumbled and eye- 
balls that rolled. The picture was shelved 
on account of a lawsuit. Then came "The 
Ten Commandments." Mortensen de- 
signed a series of Egyptian false-faces to 
be worn by the high priests in the temple, 
and added horror to the Exodus by having 
the priests join the rout still wearing the 
masks which they had forgotten to lay 
aside. 

But when the scene was pre-viewed, it 
was decided that the rams' horns and vul- 
tures' beaks fleeing in the chariots might 
cause laughter in the audience, and spoil 
the dramatic tensity of the scene, so they 
were cut out. "The Four Horsemen of 
the Apocalypse" changed movie extras to 
shapes of doom by means of hideous 
masks. Then Fox made a picture with a 
symbolical sequence, showing the Seven 
Deadly Sins, with masks that represented 
Pride and Lust and Gluttony and the rest 
of the seven. 

The Phantom's Death's-Head 

Ion Chaney has used Mortensen masks in 
almost all of his pictures. In "The 
Phantom of the Opera" it was a death's- 
head, worn by the Phantom at the fancy 
dress ball, so hideous that it sent a chill not 
only over the shrinking throngs of extras, 
but over audiences as well. 

Quite recently two pictures have used 
these masks. In "The Racket" Marie Pre- 
vost and Lucien Prival wear grotesque 
faces for a dance. In "Name the Woman" 
Anita Stewart hides behind a strange white 
face with downcast eyes and subtle smile. 
But it is another use for his masks that 
William Mortensen visions in the pictures 
of the future — that of firing the imagina- 
tion of the audience so that they will in- 
vest the scene with their own fancies and 
ideas. 



"They will be used to express states of 
mind, conditions of the soul," he says. 
"Do you see what I mean? Theodore 
Kosloff lent me a book of Russian folk 
tales not long ago. In one of them there is 
a baker, a gross, stupid creature who all 
day kneads his bread. But at night he 
pants upstairs to his attic and plays on his 
violin, a cheap violin, bad music, but beau- 
tiful to him. Can't you see how masks 
would help to picture such a story? You 
would have him wear one, immense pendu- 
lous cheeks, silly vacant grin, before the 
world, but alone, playing his music, the 
mask would fall to show the soul beneath. 
Or it might be a Christ-like character who 
saw what other people did not see, instead 
of the faces, the spirits of those about him. 

Imagination, the Great Artist 

"T think that — slowly — the producers are 
beginning to realize that suggestion is 
better than completion. People's imagina- 
tion can build better scenes than any stage 
carpenter, and can complete any gesture 
that is begun better than an actor can. 
Masks challenge the imagination. They 
give the audience a part in the picture." 

Glancing back as I leave the studio, I 
see the masks staring fixedly from the wall 
and shiver a trifle, remembering how they 
"come alive" when Mortensen puts them 
on. The faces on Hollywood Boulevard 
look suddenly masklike ; that star's set 
smile concealing the dread of losing her 
glory, this star's haughty disdain hiding 
the fear of growing old. 

Gazing at those grotesque sculptures 
in plaster, extreme in configuration as 
they are, somehow reveals the thought 
that lies behind so many eyes that look 
out upon life in this city of gold and 
celluloid. Eyes that see visions of sud- 
den and towering grandeur, eyes that try 
not to see its crumbling and collapse. 
Eyes silly with hopes built only upon a 
petty personal conceit, eyes soon to widen 
in fear as the merciless measure of ap- 
praisal is laid next to what is behind 
them. The eyes of the world, seeing in 
it chiefly themselves, and never truly. 




This may remind you a bit of Bluebeard's private sample room. There, among his 

souvenirs, he kept remnants of the ladies who had lost their heads for love of him. 

As a matter of fact, the glimpse is merely one of William Mortensen's studio, and the 

quite unterrified lady in the picture is Fay Wray 




BATHASWEET 




for a 

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Skin 

If you could bathe every day in rain-water, 
you would see some astonishing changes 
in your skin. It would grow steadily 
smoother and softer and clearer. For rain- 
water is the softest water known — and the 
kindest to your skin. But it is difficult to get 
rain-water. So women are using Bathasweet. 

Bathasweet softens ordinary water and gives 
it the same wonderful qualities that rain- 
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It gets into every tiny recess of the pores, 
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LUXURY, TOO 

Besides, there's such a comfortable, luxuri- 
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all about you! 

ALL-DAY LOVELINESS 

And then, as you step from your Bathasweet 
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this cleanliness extends deep down in the 
pores, its wholesomeness lingers all day long. 

BATHASWEET costs only 25c, 50c, $1.00 
and $1.30 at drug and department stores. 



"C""D 1h|7 A. can sent free if you 



free if you mail this 
coupon with name and address to 
C.S.Welch Co., Dept. M-E,iqo7 Park Avenue, 
New York. 



115 




The smart woman 
achieves lovely lips 

She runs a little stick of orange magic firmly 
over her lips. Gradually, they begin to glow — 
not with the orange color of the lipstick, 
but blush-rose, Nature's own youthful bloom! 

Once more she applies the lipstick . . . the 
color deepens, becomes richer, astonishingly 
lovely! No trace of grease or pigment, no 
unnatural coating. Nothing except a lovely 
glow, so natural it seems a 
part of her own lips . . . and, 
indeed, it is — for it is as per- 
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On sale everywhere. Look 
for the name TANGEE on 
carton and case. 




PRICES— Tangee Lip- 
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Compact 75c, Tangee 
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Cream and 
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THE POWER of 

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Twenty cents brings you the mini- 
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items and the "Art of Make-up " 
Address Dept. M. P.4 The George 
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New York City. 

Name 

Address 




Taking it easy and smiling, that's what Maria Alba is doing. She can well afford to do it 
now that she is playing leading roles for Fox 



Bitter Bills to Swallow 



{Continued from page 71) 



friend remembered the episode of the 
Wanger epistle and suggested they pay a 
"call. Just for the hell of it. 

They strolled into the outer offices of 
Paramount. A mild-appearing gentleman 
with nose-glasses bumped into them. He 
asked them their business. Jim said he 
had a letter or something for Mr. Wanger. 
The M.-A. gentleman invited them into his 
sanctum. He cast one more glance at the 
nonchalant Jim. He said, "How would 
you like a contract for five years at umpty- 
steen a week? Please sign here, on the 
dotted line." He was Jesse Lasky. 

No Foolin' 

And if you don't believe that these things 
■^ ever happen, if you are about to get 
snooty and infer that I am inventing this 
yarn in order to fill space, I can only regret 
that you were not with us yesterday. And 
by us I mean James Hall and myself, 
seated, as we were, in lounging chairs in 
the Western Offices of the Magazines, dis- 
cussing life and love and extra girls. For 
he told me this and I got him right and 
no foolin'. 

Well, Jim said to Mr. Lasky 'that he 
didn't care if he did and he rolled up his 
sleeves and signed the contract then and 
there and then Jesse Lasky presented him 
with a $1,500 cash bonus, and Jim and his 
pal continued their stroll. 

A year ago when, according to Para- 
mount tradition, Mr. Lasky was presenting 
prizes and verbal encomiums to the ten best 
players of the year, Jim drew a gold 
thingumbob. He also drew from Mr. 
Lasky the comment that he was the first 
player ever signed by Paramount without 
a screen test as a preliminary. Which 
ought to establish the Hall profile as 
among the best sellers. Or what have you. 

So much for that. 

James left New York and footlights and 
first love and came to Hollywood. He 
came believing that all is gold that glitters. 
Even when a bit tarnished. 



It looked so beautiful. Everything was 
so awfully jake. The streets were teem- 
ing with beautiful girls. You couldn't even 
get a wienie at the hands of anyone less 
than Helen of Troy or Peg H. Joyce. If 
you had to die, you died under a Rolls- 
Royce. Or of dyspepsia, eating truffles and 
partridge with the Tony Morenos. If you 
had anything to worry about, it was what 
to do with the money shower-bathed over 
you. Work couldn't kill you because all 
you had to do was ogle some siren. 
Everyone was your friend. Everyone 
wished you well. Rooted for you. Gee, 
it was great ! 

The streets were teeming with beautiful 
girls. Right. But the girls were not the 
good ole kids of Broadway. Back on 
Broadway the girls were pals. If a fellow 
was down on his luck and could only pur- 
chase a ham sandwich and a trolley ride, 
the girls stepped right along. They'd even 
buy the ham sandwiches themselves if the 
season for pocketbooks ran that way. If 
they liked a fellow, well, say ! But not in 
Hollywood. In Hollywood they say "who 
do you know? Can you introduce me to 
Cecil de Mille? Have you a part for me 
in your next picture ? Can you put me next 
to a screen test?" In Hollywood it's not 
what you are, it's what can you do for me. 9 

Jim found that out. 

Mushroom Families 

"Vou got your money all right. Lots more 
than you'd ever dreamed of getting. 
But you weren't the only one to get it. 
For lo, a family grew up where no family 
had ever been before ! Strange-appearing 
males and females came pussy-footing up, 
sobbing affectionately, "Jim, Jim, don't you 
remember Uncle Tobias and dear old 
Aunt Mame? Why, J-i-m!" The town 
was suddenly overflowing with indigent 
actors. Jim said to me, "I never saw so 
many starving actors in my life. Great 
huskies who should have been shouldering 
(Continued on page 119) 



Better Than He Expected 

(Continued from page 104) 

bouquets and cheers, -no mayor to read an 
address of welcome at the station ; and 
there were no bouquets or cheers from 
Hollywood movie society. The old watch- 
ful waiting policy was adhered to. 

Vilma Banky was politely cordial, but 
did not attempt conversation with her new 
leading man off the set. Sam Goldwyn 
did not unbend from the social point of 
view, and cautiously invited Walter to 
nothing more committing than a drink in 
the office. Ronald Colman passed once or 
twice with a pleasant nod. None of the 
United Artists stars and directors working 
in the same studio were introduced to 
Walter or attempted to introduce them- 
selves. There were no invitations to 
parties. The only people in the studio 
who took any interest in the young Eng- 
lishman were the cameraman, George 
Barnes, who is not society, and the script 
girl, who liked Walter because he could 
speak to her in French, her native lan- 
guage. A kind-hearted but busy jour- 
nalist, Margaret Chute, introduced Walter 
to some of the Englishmen in Hollywood 
and to Louis Wolheim. 

That is what it is like to come to Holly- 
wood as the Great New Discovery and the 
new Ronald Colman. It's never the way 
you'd think it would be — unless the con- 
tract calls for such a big salary, that 
society can feel certain its holder is going 
to be a success. 

Walter Byron is an Englishman of the 
most charming sort — and they can be 
charming. He has the good breeding and 
reserve of Ronald Colman, but he can 
be more vivacious and unbending. He has 
fair hair, blue eyes and freckles. His re- 
markable success in English pictures, in 
which he has been for some time one of 
the most sought-after young juvenile leads, 
points to an equal or greater vogue in the 
California brand of movie. As soon as 
his vogue begins over here, watch Holly- 
wood society take him up. 




Walter Byron isn't much for blowing his own 
horn. But he wishes California motorists 
would blow theirs. Lindbergh's flight, he says, 
was child's-play compared to crossing Holly- 
wood Boulevard on foot 





Marvelous New Discovery 
Makes Hair Beautifully Wavy 



The Spanish Beggar's 
Priceless Gift 

A story by Winifred Ralston 

FROM the day we started to school Charity Win- 
throp and I were called the tousled-hair twins. 
Our hair simply wouldn't behave. 

As we grew older the hated name still clung to us. 
Then Charity's family moved to Spain and I didn't 
see her again until last New Year's eve. 

A party of us had gone to the Drake Hotel for din- 
ner that night. I was ashamed of my hair. 

Horribly self-conscious, I was sitting at the table, 
scarcely touching my food, wishing I were home. It 
seemed that everyone had wonderful, lustrous, curly 
hair but me, and I felt that they were all laughing — or 
worse, pitying me behind my back. 

My eyes strayed to the dance floor and there I saw 
a beautiful girl dancing with Tom Harvey. Her eye 
caught mine and to my surprise she smiled. 

About this girl's face was a halo of golden curls. I 
think she had the most beautiful hair I ever saw. My 
face must have turned scarlet as I compared it men- 
tally with my own straggly, ugly mop. 

Of course you have guessed her identity — Charity 
Winthrop, who once had dull straight hair like mine. 

It had been five long years since I had seen her. 
But I simply couldn't wait. I blurted out — "Charity 
Winthrop — what miracle has happened to your hair? " 

She smiled and said mysteriously, "Come to my 
room and I will tell you the whole story." 

Charity tells of the beggar's gift 

"Our house in Madrid faced a little, old plaza where 
I often strolled after my siesta. 

" Miguel, the beggar, always occupied the end bench 
of the south end of the plaza. I always dropped a few 
centavos in his hat when I passed. 

"The day before I left Madrid I stopped to bid him 
goodby and pressed a gold coin in his palm. 

"'Hija mia,' he said. 'You have been very kind to 
an old man. Digemelo (tell me) senorita, what it is 
your heart most desires.' 

"I laughed at the idea, then said jokingly, 'Miguel, 
my hair is straight and dull. I would have it lustrous 
and curly.' _ 

"'Oigame, Senorila,' he said — 'Many years ago a 
Castillian prince was wedded to a Moorish beauty. 
Her hair was black and straight as an arrow. Like 
you, this lady wanted los pclos riios (curly hair). Her 
husband offered thousands of pesos to the man who 
would fulfil her wish. The prize fell to Pedro the dro- 
guero. He brewed a potion that converted the prin- 
cess' straight, unruly hair into a glorious mass of ring- 
let curls. 

" ' Pedro, son of the son of Pedro, has that secret to- 
day. Years ago I did him a great service. Here you 
will find him; go to him and tell your wish.' 

" I called a coche and gave the driver the address. 

"At the door of the apothecary shop, a funny old 
hawk-nosed Spaniard- met me. I stammered out my 
explanati&n. When I finished, he vanished into his 
store, returned and handed me a bottle. 

"Terribly excited — I could hardly wait until I 
reached home. When I was in my room alone, I took 
down my hair and applied the liquid as directed. In 
a short time, the transformation which you have 
noted had taken place. 



"Come, Winifred — apply it to your own hair and 
see what it can do for you." 

When I looked into Charity's mirror I could hardly 
believe my eyes. The impossible had happened. My 
dull, straight hair had wound itself into curling ten- 
drils. My head was a mass of ringlets and waves. It 
shone with a lustre it never had before. 

You can imagine the amazement of the others in 
the party when I returned to the ballroom. Every- 
body noticed the change. I was popular. Men clus- 
tered about me. I had never been so happy. 

The next morning when I awoke I hardly dared look 
in my mirror, fearing it had all been a dream. But it 
was gloriously true. My hair was beautifully curly. 



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Only one Order to a Family Now ! 

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you are not perfectly delighted with re- 
sults after using "Wave-Sta" for 5 days, 
simply return the unused portion and your 
money will be refunded. Under the 
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send any money in advance. Simply sign and mail the coupon. 
Then when the postman brings this remarkable beauty aid, just pay 
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forever. 

This offer may not be repeated. Remember, we take all the risk. 
If with "Wave-Sta" and tne Wave Modellers you are not able to 
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CENTURY CHEMISTS 

7 W. Austin Ave. Chicago, 111. 



Wavy Bob 



Send no money — simply sign and mail the coupon 



r 



CENTURY CHEMISTS 



7 W. Austin Ave. 
Chicago, 111. 



M. P. 31 



~1 
I 



I 

Gentlemen: Please send me, in plain wrapper, by I 
insured parcel post, a full sized bottle of "Wave-Sta" 

(Spanish Waving Fluid). And a set of new Wave | 

Modellers. I will pay postman the special trial I 

price of $2.30, plus few cents' postage, on delivery, I 

with the understanding that if, after a 5-day trial, | 



I am not perfectly delighted with the magic waving 
liquid, I may return the unused contents in the bottle 
and Wave Modellers and you will immediately return 



my money in full. 



Name. 



Address ' 

NOTE: If you are apt to be out when the~postman J 

calls, you may enclose $2.40 and "Wave-Sta" will be I 
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117 



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118 



IF 



your subscription ex- 
pires with this month's 
issue you will find an 
expiration notice in 
your copy. 

Don't delay — mail 
us your renewal at 
once. This will bring 
the next issue of 
Motion Picture 
Magazine to you 
promptly. 





Listen to the description of the beach wrap 
Mary Brian is wearing, then run — don't 
walk — to the nearest shop: It is of gray 
pussy-willow taffeta, embellished with blue, 
green and white waves which form a band on 
sleeves and hem 

She Knows Her Orchids 

{Continued- from page 105) 

dinner with them that evening. Jane used 
to accept the dinners and then walk home. 
She had just about exhausted the New 
York supply of floor-walkers when she 
landed a real, honest-to-goodness job as a 
model in one of New York's most ex- 
clusive establishments of the mode. As 
Jane wears clothes like nobody's business, 
it wasn't long until she was promoted to 
head model. 

This is just the right spot for some 
theatrical producer to step into the story. 
Ziegfeld did. He got a look at Jane one 
day when she was wearing a corsage of 
red roses on a white dress, and that was 
the beginning of a "Follies" engagement. 

Movies via Follies 

Q he was lunching at the Ritz one day 
just before matinee time and Jesse 
Lasky and Adolph Zukor had the next 
table. They kept looking at Jane, at her 
smart clothes and her photographic figure 
and making comments. Jane said to the 
girl she was lunching with, "I bet I get 
a movie contract." If you think she 
didn't, you're wrong. Before Mr. Lasky 
and Mr. Zukor left the Ritz they had 
made an appointment for Jane to have a 
movie test. After that it was all soft 
focus. Her life became just one lovely 
gown after another — in the movies. 

When her Lasky contract expired, Jane 
launched out on a free-lance career, and 
she's worked so hard and so profitably 
that she has stolen a few months to vaca- 
tion in Europe. When she returns she is 
going to continue to do such things as the 
sophisticated sister in "The Patsy." She 
doesn't mind being the naughty element at 
all. After all, everybody has his or her 
place on the screen. 



Bitter Bills to Swallow 

(Continued from page 116) 

a pick axe instead of blubbering hard-luck 
stories. Empty hands. The very air was 
creeping with them. Empty hands — it re- 
sulted in my losing my home on a fore- 
closure and being far more on the debit 
than the credit side of the books." 

Jim found that out, too. 

You ogled sirens— now and then. But 
you did other things, too. In "Hell's 
Angels"- — the Caddo Production featuring 
Jim, Ben Lyon and Greta Nissen — Jim and 
Ben spent hours three thousand feet in the 
air. In a giant bomber. They are not 
only their own actors but their own cam- 
eramen and directors as well. Not skilled 
airmen, they take their lives in their in- 
trepid hands and dare an immediate im- 
mortality — in celluloid if nothing better. 

In a picture with Bebe Daniels, Jim and 
Bebe worked for weeks in a condemned 
gold mine. They worked knowing full 
well that the mine might cave in at any 
moment and they would see God. With no 
expenses for interment. 

And even if the story in hand happens 
to steer away from death-traps, and ogling 
is the order of the day, it isn't easy to ogle 
when you have to begin at four a. m. and 
keep on ogling until after midnight. That 
has happened. 

Simpson, the Male Delilah 

Jim found that out. And you are finding 
out-that every question has two or three 
sides. You ought to have known it before. 

Everyone wishes you well. Of course. 
But such odd, odd ways of showing it. 
The lad named Simpson or something. 
Who got an inning, thanks to Jim and 
Bebe and Ben. And then went home and 
talked about Jim, what a ham he is and 
how did he get this way while he, Simpson 
or something. 

And the scandals and near-scandals. The 
rumors and hints. The affairs he is sup- 
posed to have had. Joan Crawford, Sally 
Phipps. The latter as yet unknown to 
him even by sight. Jim is going around 
now with Merna Kennedy. Someone will 
have something to say about that. Since 
time immemorial, young men have gone 
around with young girls and no one but the 
moon and a nightingale have been the 
wiser. But not in Hollywood! 

Gee, it was great ! 

Well, it is great! Of course. Nothing 
quite like it. But the rose has a thorn. 
The golden bee a sting. The velvet glove 
a hand that bruises. 

In less than two brief years — from his 
first picture "The Campus Flirt," with 
Bebe Daniels; to "The Fleet's In" with 
Clara Bow, now in production, Jim Hall 
has found time to begin payment on the 
bitter bills of Hollywood. He is even 
afraid of his tried and true friendship with 
Ben Lyon. A friendship that has given 
and taken. Generously. But what if 
something — you pay with FEAR in Holly- 
wood. 

Make no mistake about this. 



Read 

THE SECOND CHRIST 
WEIGHS HOLLYWOOD 

— an article relating the views of one 
of the world's greatest religious leaders, 
Krishnamurti, upon the people and the 
ideals of the motion picture capital — in 
the September issue of 

MOTION PICTURE 

It's the Magazine of Authority 




Is it a Mysterious Gift? Do you have it 

unbeknown? Is it Beauty, Knowledge, 

Sex — What? You can find out! 



SOME women simply fascinate every man they 
meet, at will. Men know this from experience. 
Women recognize it. But women do not often 
know the reason. Only one woman in a hundred 
knows — and then perhaps only vaguely, instinctively. 
Women fear, envy, hate the siren for her power — 
yet would give everything to possess this very power 
... to use circumspectly, but still to use. 
What is it? Beauty? Not great beauty, certainly. 
For with sincere truth, and complete bewilderment, 
you say of some woman: "I don't see what men see 
in her." Someof the world's most fascinating women 
are almost homely — if you study them closely. And 
some very beautiful women lack nearly every fascin- 
ation. Strange — but absolutely beyond question. 
Can it be knowledge? No; for often the highest intel- 
lectual development is an almost impossible barrier 
to fascination. Sex appeal, then? Again no; for thou- 
sands of women have resorted to physical charms as 
a reliance — with almost inevitable failure. 

How Very Clever Nature Has Been 

Nature has never desired a race of women, all fascin- 
ating. Her plan is for limited charm, a little to every 
woman . '. . enough attraction for mating ... just 
the amount that keeps the_ world in its ruts and 
grooves ... and only once in a hundred times the 
gift of supreme allurement. 

And nature has made almost the whole world blind to 
the great secret. She has thrust forward sex appeal — 
and countless useless volumes have been written on 
this theme. She has made it seem that great beauty 
solved the riddle — and then flatly contradicted her- 
self . . . again sending astray those who would solve 
the puzzle. 

Then what is it that women have who fascinate men? 
"What is their dangerous power?" 

At Last the Secret Is Known 

One woman in the world — so far as it is known — 
understands the dangerous secret of supreme fascin- 
ation in full. It came to her little by little over a 
period of many years. This woman is Lucille Young 
. . . once as homely and unattractive as a woman 
could be . . . now as fascinating and compelling in 
her charm and beauty as any famous figure who ever 
filled the pages of history, or graced the current times. 
Lucille Young is the world's foremost beauty expert. 
Yes . . . but much more than that. She is the one 
woman who has found the mysterious key to fascina- 
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all. She has discovered nature's strange adjustment 



when she creates 
the world's sirens. 
Lucille Young under- 
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An Actual Life Story of Experience 

Lucille Young's marvelous book, "Making Beauty 
Yours," is different from anything else you ever read. 
It is not theory, but her own life history, the exact ac- 
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power. But Lucille Young cautions, too, against the 
use of this power to its full, or for any purpose other 
than legitimate fascination, the natural charm every 
woman is entitled to exert upon those around her. 
When you have read the book, the mystery of fascin- 
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the way is plain. This book, indeed, may easily change 
the whole course of life for you, bring you happiness 
and power you would never have without it. 
And the book is Free — absolutely and entirely Free. 
Miss Young believes that it is every woman's right to 
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119 



I 




^ow in Song! 

A wonderful new song 
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Motion Picture Magazine 
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For the enclosed $1.00 please 
send me these three song hits: 
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Can your dog wield a whisk-broom and brush your clothes for you? Then he can't 

be promoted to the class of Flash, the police dog, who is here removing every speck of 

dust from Louise Lorraine's suit 



The Answer Man 

(Continued from page 113) 



V. L. M. — Ralph Forbes was born in 
England, Sept. 31, 1898. He is married, 
six feet tall, weighs 165 pounds, has blond 
hair and blue eyes. Charles Farrell can 
be reached at the Fox Studios, 1401 No. 
Western Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. Charlie's 
fan mail mounts into thousands weekly. 
His father owns several movie theaters 
around Cape Cod, Mass. He rides around 
in an old flivver and doesn't care who 
sees it. 

BERTHA OF MANCTON — Billie 
Dove was born in New York City, May 14, 
1901. Her latest picture is "The Yellow 
Lily," you may write her at the First Na- 
tional Studios, Burbank, Cal. Antonio 
Moreno was born in Spain, Sept. 26, 1888. 
Ben Alexander, sixteen years old, will play 
in "The River Pirate," starring Victor 
McLaglen. Write Ben at the Fox Studios, 
1401 No. Western Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 

BLONDIE — We have 'em every month. 
No, I don't prefer blondes I like them all. 
Belty Bronson was born in Trenton, N. J., 
November 17, 1906, five feet tall, weighs 
100 pounds. Her latest appearance is "The 
Singing Fool," starring Al Jolson. Monte 
Blue, January 11, 1890, six feet two inches 
tall, weighs 180 pounds, married to Tove 
Jansen. When is a microbe not a 
microbe? Don't bacilli. Norman Kerry 
is married. Mabel Ballin is the wife of 



Hugo Ballin, she's not playing in pic- 
tures right now. 

REAT OF DAYTON— Alice Joyce was 
born in Kansas City, Mo., Oct. 1, 1890. 
She is married to James Regan, and they 
have two cbildren. Clara Bow in Brooklyn, 
Aug. 8, 1902. She's five feet two and one- 
half inches tall, weighs 109 pounds, Ameri- 
can, and her latest picture is "The Fleet's 
In." Address your letter to her at the 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. Nick Stuart and Barry 
Norton at Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western 
Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 

LANE CHANDLER FAN— This bird's 
getting popular, too. Lane was born in 
Montana, June 1, 1901. Has reddish-brown 
hair, grey eyes, single, and his latest picture 
is "The First Kiss," starring Gary Cooper 
and Fay Wray. Send that note to the 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

THREE INQUISITIVE WS.— Rich- 
ard Dix has recovered nicely from his 
operation," thank you. His latest picture 
is "Warming Up." Lon Chaney does not 
answer his fan mail for some reason or 
other. Josephine Borio is playing in "The 
Cossacks." Write her at Metro-Goldwyn 
Studios, Culver City, Cal. Big Boy is 
three years old, real name is Malcolm Se- 









120 



/ 



/ 



bastian. A stylograph is a pencil-like 
writing instrument having an ink-reservoir 
from which ink is fed to a tubular writing- 
point. 

BABS — Greta Garbo wa? born in Stock- 
holm, Sweden, in 1905. Greta's five feet 
seven inches tall, weighs 123 pounds, light 
hair and blue eyes. She is playing in 
"War in the Dark." You can write her at 
the Metro-Goldwyn Studios, Culver City, 
Cal. Gary Cooper, Helena, Montana, May 
7, 1901. Six feet two inches tall, weighs 
180 pounds, reddish-brown hair, blue eyes. 
Still a bachelor, send that little pink en- 
velope to the Paramount Studios, 5451 
Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

H. EDWARD M— Your questions could 
not be answered in the July issue, that issue 
was closed when I received your note. 
Cheer up, here they are. Charles Farrell 
was born Aug. 9, 1905. He's six feet two 
inches tall, weighs 175 pounds, brown hair 
and eyes. Latest picture, "The Red Dance." 
John Barrymore, Sept. 15, 1882, five feet 
ten inches tall, brown hair, light eyes. 
Reginald Denny was born in London, En- 
gland, Nov. 20, 1891. He is six feet tall, 
weighs 180 pounds, has brown hair, hazel 
eyes. Write Reggie, at Universal Studios, 
Universal City, Cal. 

SENTIMENTAL SUE— That won't help. 
Myrna Loy did not play in "The Jazz Sing- 
er." Victor Varconi was born March 31, 
1896. He plays opposite Corinne Griffith 
in "The Divine Lady." Lars Hanson is 
not married to Gertrude Olmstead. Ger- 
trude is married to Robert Z. Leonard, 



Lars to Karin Nolander. They are in 
Europe, for a short vacation. Your let- 
ter will reach him at the Metro-Goldwyn 
Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

M. R. M. — Ricardo Cortez is playing in 
"A Grain of Dust." Claire Windsor plays 
opposite him. Write them at the Tiffany- 
Stahl Prod., 933 N. Seward St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. Ben Lyon in "Hell's Angels," 
produced at the Caddo Prod., United Art- 
ists Studios, 1041 No. Formosa Ave., 
Hollywood, Cal. Ronald Colman, "The 
Rescue," Lili Damita is his leading lady. 
Write them at Samuel Goldwyn Prod., De- 
Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

L. M. — All wrong about Richard Dix. 
He can be reached at the Paramount Stu- 
dios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 
Write Vilma Banky and Ronald Colman 
at the Samuel Goldwyn Prod., De Mille 
Studios, Culver City, Cal. Norma Shearer, 
Ramon Novarro and John Gilbert, the 
Metro-Goldwyn Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

BETTY HA ! HA !— Why the laughter? 
Louise Fazenda, Ethel Wales and Dorothy 
Phillips were the three women who played 
in "The Cradle Snatchers." Mary Philbin, 
"The Man Who Laughs." Write her at 
the Universal Studios, Universal City, 
Cal. A spark-plug is a device for ignit- 
ing the charge in an internal-combustion 
engine, by means of an electric current. 
Tim McCoy is playing in "The Bush- 
ranger." Mary Astor and Lloyd Hughes 
have the leads in "Heart to Heart." Gary 
Cooper and Colleen Moore in "Lilac 
Time." 




Nancy Carroll has just announced that she will take a passenger with her on her 

flight, and judging from the crowd that is pushing forward she will have to spend 

the remainder of her days taking up passengers 










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121 




Before Kenneth McCarfy 
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Much has been written about the delights of settling down in a one-horse town. 
But not until we saw this picture of Audrey Ferris did we quite appreciate the idea 

Fugitives from Fame 

(Continued from page 69) 



Neil, Ronald Colman and Warner Baxter 
came in from a two hours' fishing trip. 
Each claimed the six rock bass they had 
in a pail. "Come in to dinner tonight," 
shouted Neil to everbody in sight as he 
ran into his kitchen door with the catch. 
He has named his cottage "Digby," while 
Mr. Colman, who lives next door, calls 
his "Beau Geste." 

Herbert Brenon, the director, plans to 
live at Malibu Beach the year round. He 
has one of the most attractive homes in 
the colon}'. Next door to him lives Raoul 
Walsh in another lovely villa. These two 
friends leased three lots, dividing one lot 
and a half between them. This gives them 
ample space for large homes, and Mr. 
Brenon has a big tennis court at the rear. 

A colorful plaque swinging from a post 
in the front of Mr. Brenon's lot announces 
that this is "The House of Peter Pan." 
Quaint pointed gables painted red, and 
long leaded-glass windows that swing 
wide open, bring memories of the house 
from which Wendy and Peter Pan flew 
out into the world. 

Virginia Valli's house is called "Hale- 
kulani," a Hawaiian word meaning "A Bit 
of Heaven." "ft is just that to me after a 
hard day at the studio," says Miss Valli. 

Dick Sick at Wrong Time 

The very last cottage in the row at the 
north end has just been built and is still 
unfurnished. "Too bad Richard Dix didn't 
get his house completed before he had to 
go to the hospital," said Hal Wallis as he 
walked down the line with us. Mr. Wallis, 
you will remember, is the husband of 
Louise Fazenda and publicity director at 
Warner Brothers Studio. "This would 



have been an ideal place for Dix to con- 
valesce," he added. 

We walked back to Miss Fazenda's cot- 
tage, located in almost the middle of the 
colony. Just south of her, Bob Leonard 
and his wife, Gertrude Olmsted, are rush- 
ing their cottage to completion. 

Allan Dwan is just beyond them, while 
neighbor to him is Fred Beetson, repre- 
sentative of Will Hays. He is not there 
as a chaperon, as some might think, but 
for the simple reason that he enjoys a 
seclusive beach. 

Karl Dane, who used to belong to the 
carpenters' union before he made a big hit 
as the doughboy in "The Big Parade," is 
actually building his home down there. 
Like Mr. Brenon, he plans on making 
Malibu Beach his residence the year 
round. 

The cottages that are just being com- 
pleted are much more elaborate than those 
built at first. Dorothy Mackaill is about 
ready to move into her eight-room dwell- 
ing, which seems. too expensive to be built 
on leased ground. Sally O'Neill is another 
newcomer who has an elaborate home. 

There are no telephones at Malibu 
Beach; and until this summer there was 
no way of communicating with the outside 
world except by special trips into town. 
Two enterprising college boys have recentty 
established a unique system. For five, 
dollars a week they deliver ■ a daily paper, 
run errands, deliver telegrams, etc., and 
patrol the private road running back of 
the cottage every two hours of the day. 

This picture colony has started real 
estate activity along the beach above and 
below the movie colony, but scheme as 
they will, the public cannot crash. 



122 



May Contest Winners 

From the several thousand drawings of Big Boy submitted in Motion Picture 
Junior's contest, as announced in the May issue of this magazine, the board of judges 
has selected one hundred and sixty-two prize winners. 

Considerations of space fail to permit of a complete listing of the successful con- 
testants. Only the names of those comprised in the first fifty may here be given. 
But this need not concern the others. They will be notified by letter and their prizes 
for warded to them. 

Here follows the list of winners, in the order of the prizes awarded to them : 

(1) Mary Ellen Stephens, 1322 Nolan Ave., (26 

Birmingham, Ala. 

(2) Robert J. Jambor, 2427 S." Ridgeland Ave., (27 

Berwyn, Illinois 

(3) Paul S. Julinne, Jr., 360 Michigan Ave., (23 

Mobile, Ala. 
(-1) Elinor Louvy, 441 West End Ave., New (29 
York City. Apt. 7A 

(5) Frank L. Singer, Jr., 229 West 97th St., (30 

New York City 

(6) G. W. Bedsole, Jr., R. F. D. 1, Box 128, (31 

Dothan, Alabama 

(7) Billie Johnson, Camas, Washington (32 
(o) Arthur F. Menig, 539 Jefferson Ave., Eliz- 
abeth, N. T. (33 

(9) Nicholas Settanni, 611 East 29th St., Brook- 
lyn, N. V. (34 

(10) Mildred Hengeveld, 137 Cornell Ave., Haw- 

thorne, N. J. (35 

(11) Bobby Farley, 230 North 11th Ave., Poca- (36 

■ tello, Idaho (37 

(12) Helene E. Donovan, 49 Wellington So., 

Hamilton, Out., Canada (38 

(13) Dorothy Lewis, 411 N. Snelling Ave., St. 

Paul, Minn. (39 

(14) Stella Maurine Hensley, Jacksboro, Texas 

(15) Rosanne Friedman, 16 Bremen St., Day- (40 

ton, Ohio 

(15) Gladys Crowley, 10 Durrell St., Dover, N. H. (41 

(17) Billy Hinks, 3937 So. Hill St., Los An- 
geles, Calif. (42 

(13) Lillian Bickmeyer, 2412 Frye St., Jackson (43 
Heights, N. Y. (44 

C9) Martha Cheny, Southern Pines, North Caro- 
lina (45 

(20) John L. Roberts, 405 Drexel Ave., San 

Antonio, Texas (46 

(21) Marjorie Bosenbark, 806 Spruce St., El- 

mira, N. Y. (47 

(22) Phyllis Hill, 220 Daisy Ave., Long Branch, 

Ontario, Canada (48 

(23) Dorothy Smith, 2106 Elm St., Butte, Mont. 

(24) Virginia K. Joss, 38 Englewood Ave., Brook- (49 

line, Mass. 

(25) Marjorie Crump, 1506 Jackson St., Ama- (50 

rillo, Texas 



Rosa Bianco, 2815 Salmon St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Julius G. Eisenrieth, 746 Adams Ave., Eliz- 
abeth, N. 1. 

Conwalt F. Ahrens, 2956 Santa Ana St., 
South Gate, Calif. 

Marcella Poli, 538 Josephine Ave., Detroit, 
Mich. 

George O. Cutter, 62 Kenwood St., Dor- 
chester, Mass.. 

Peter Fitzpatrick, 901 Ogden Ave., High- 
bridge, New York City 

PhilJTj- Ciotti, 1814 Stockholm Ave., Wincl- 
ber, Pa. 

Gerard F. Park, 502 Union Ave. N. E., 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Jack Hall, 60 Playter Blvd., Toronto, Ont., 
Canada 

Elizabeth Bacon, 748 47th St., Oakland, Calif. 

Thomas Frick, 11 Packer St., Sunbury, Pa. 

Muriel Smith, 238 Williams Ave., Has- 
brouck Heights, N. J. 

Marion Snow, 229 Whitaker St., Portland, 
Oregon 

Dick Bentley, Jr., P. O. Box 264, Dallas, 
Texas 

Louise Manning, 1409 Kirkam St., Oakland, 
Calif. 

Clara H. Baker, R. F. D. 1, Smyrna, Dela. 
Ford Farm, Kent County 

Lola Newkirk, Princeton, W. Va. 

Dorothy Halverson, 407 2nd St., Havre, Mont. 

Barbara May Picard, 6460 Yi Lexington 
Ave., Hollywood, Calif. 

Harold Jacobson, 1156 East 26th St., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

Wanda Gene Minard, 552 West Centennial 
St., Nappanee, Indiana 

Leila Nady, "La Repub'.ique" Stamboul 
(Maison Rouge), Turkey 

Catherine Bowsky, 374 6th Ave., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

Jack Reilly, 2102 Henderson Ave., Dallas, 
Texas 

Charles Stuart, Charter Oak Ave., East 
Haven, Conn. 





Have you a corn? Louise Fazenda is showing you how to do away with a corn or 
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123 



~f^ 



The Second Christ 
Weighs Hollywood 



What would an ascetic prophet think of Hollywood? 

What would a man whose life had been devoted to things spiritual, 
who had dedicated his existence to the study of the profundities of 
the soul, to an inquiry into the eternal verities, think of it? 

How would strike him its glamour, its lavish richness, its power, 
its display? 

These questions have often been asked. 

But never, until now, answered. 

For in Hollywood today there is such a man: a profound and sincere 
and world-famed prophet. 

The man who is regarded by the great theosophist, Mrs. Annie Besant, 
and by countless other followers of this religion, as the Second Christ. 



Krishnamurti 



He is in Hollywood now; and for the first time he has consented to 
an account of his views upon Hollywood; its people, its purpose, its 
power for good and for evil. 

Krishnamurti's estimate of Hollywood, his trial of the capital and 
its people, his conclusions concerning what it possesses and what it 
lacks, are contained in an exclusive interview reported in the next, 
the September, issue of MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 

This interview, entitled "The Second Christ Weighs Hollywood," is 
probably the most significant and sensational appraisal of Holly- 
wood ever made public. 

MOTION PICTURE, the September number, will be on sale July 
28th. Watch for the date and for the magazine on the newsstands. 
You can't afford to miss THE SECOND CHRIST WEIGHS HOLLY- 
WOOD — or any other of the up-to-the-minute and fresh features — 

in September MOTION PICTURE 

It's the Magazine of Authority 



124 '.» - EDWARD LANGER PRINTING CO.. JNt 

JAMAICA, NEW YORK CUT. 



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Butchering Brains 
Krishnamurti 

Seven Deadly Cliques 
Are you from West Virginia/ 

{Turn to Page 40) 





ir-o-C/ 



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fi A # ,.f A /v o 
5 ^OA/ 4T 




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charm of youth 



i 



"that schoolgirl complexion" 



The simple rule in daily skin care ro follow if you seek it 




WHEN tempted to "try" an 
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Blended of rare cosmetic 
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Use it according to the rule 
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Note the difference that 
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THE woman of today knows one goal 
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that is to keep her Youth. For she knows 
how tragically difficult, once lost, it is 
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Soap and water has become the Youth 
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Urged by leading skin specialists, that 
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Its whole secret is the kind of soap one 
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The rule to follow if guarding a 
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So, largely on expert advice, more and 
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balmy lather of Palmolive, used this way. 



Wash your face gently with soothing 
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If your skin is inclined to be dry, apply 
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Use powder and rouge if you wish. 
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10 



, Palmolive Soap is untouched by human hands until 
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Palmolive Radio Hour— Broadcast every Friday night-from 10 to 11 p. m.. eastern time; 9 to 10 p. m., 
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w 



Gkavles cmrrell &* Ajanei^jaynov 

rise to new heights in 

L FRANK BORZAOE'S A 

new love lyrie / 

from the ptay by MONCRTON HOFFE 




A thing of beauty is a joy forever. 



"Street Angel" is a picture of such ex- 
v quisitc beauty as only rarely emerges 
Ik from Hollywood — except from the J 
% Fox Studios, which gave you / 

"Sunrise", '"7th Heaven", "Four Sons", / 
■||k ""What Price Glory", It will live /";• 
when other feeble efforts have /a 
\ had their final screening. /; ' 



"'When 
Jarrett 



all is said and done Charles 
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— -Cos o4nget& HcraU 



\Dhecharm of Janet Gaynor lingers 
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<~~ f Npr York cAmtticm 




GpO MMOWlt 





For the first time Paramount Quality in motion pictures with synchronized music score, sound effects 
and talking sequences! In theatres equipped to show "sound" pictures Paramount proudly presents: 

^ fW*bM WINGS" with synchronized music score and sound effects 

exactly as presented to $2 audiences. Hear the drone of the planes, the rat-tat-tat of machine guns, etc. 
William Wellman Production with Clara Bow, Charles Rogers, Richard Arlen, etc. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ * 

' tf' V. — t^" ''' ^""^W 

M^^JB-l-A? THE WEDDING MARCH" directed by and starring Erich 

von S*roheim, with Fay Wray. Hear the throbbing love strains, the beautiful ceremonial music, the bells! 
Many of the scenes are in Technicolor. A feast for the ear as well as the eye! ♦♦♦♦•«• 

A^4wW ABIE'S IRISH ROSE" Anne Nichols' masterpiece with syn- 
chronized music score and sound effects. See and hear Jean Hersholt, Charles Rogers, Nancy Carroll sing- 
ing the beautiful theme song. A sensation! Victor Fleming Production. *♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

'THE PATRIOT" Ernst Lubitsch Production, starring Emil 
Jannings. With Florence Vidor, Lewis Stone, Neil Hamilton. Hear the thunderous Russian marches, the 
charge of the wild Cossacks, the pistol shots, the cries of the innocent! ♦♦♦♦•♦<■>•»« 

T^W,:^- WARMING UP" starring Richard Dix, in a comedy-drama 

of love, laughs and Big League Bassball. A World's Series game on the screen in sound — the crack of the 
bat, the roar of the crowd! And a new melody you'll love! Fred Newmeyer Production. • • ♦ • ♦ 

W ^^© THE CANARY MURDER CASE" From the famous mystery 
melodrama by S. S. Van Dine. William Powell as "Philo Vance," Louise Brooks, Ruth Taylor, James Hall. 
Malcolm St. Clair Production. Many sensational talking sequences. •«•♦♦♦»••• 

■-^•'i-.a<jk LOVES OF AN ACTRESS" Spectacular story of the Parisian 

stage and boulevards enhanced by synchronized music score and sound effects. Starring Pola Negri, with 
Nils Asther and all star cast. Rowland V. Lee Production. •••••*•••••» 

xraramount Pictures 

Soon "The Whole Show in Sound,"' Paramount -— «^ .^r-—^m ^*— -^ - ■ ^^^^ 

News, Christie Comedies, Stage Presentations, etc ML MM. ^^L_^ ,^S ^MMMk. T ^ji^^^^T" ~HH~~1^^ 

Produced by Paramount Famona Lasky Corp. Adolph /.ukor ^M ^^^ ^M WA I^^H i^i^J ift 

Pres., Paramount Bldg., N. Y. ^^B ■ ■ i W I I ^^B W 

"If it i a Paramount Picture, the bc*t shotv ire tuwnt l^____^l^^ ^ ^f^ ^^MM^—J k. ^^1 Mir 

4 






C1B799324 



% 




Volume XXXVI, No. 2 



September, 1928 



Features in This Issue 

Cover Portrait, Billie Dove , Marland Stone 

Butchering Brains Winnifred Eaton Reeve 28 

An author in Hollywood is as a lamb in an abattoir 

Are Summer Flirtations Dangerous? Ruth Tildesley 31 

The men in the movies say yes. The girls say nonsense 

Keeping Baby Single Madge Dressen 33 

Ben Lyon is all for his mother and all against marriage, companionate or conventional 

Our Lady of the Steppes Dorothy Spensley 34 

Baclanova mounts her own golden stairs 

Your Neighbor Says — Walter Ramsey 40 

N. R. Dawley of Charleston, West Virginia, relates all his reactions to — and some of his actions m 
Hollywood 

The Wife-Market Ruth Tildesley 42 

Buster Collier will say it's active. His girl wanted ad has crippled the Hollywood postoffice 

Hollywood's Seven Deadly Cliques Cedric Belfrage 44 

Celluloid society is closely organised and frozvns upon sin and gin 

The Second Christ Weighs Hollywood Cladys Hall 49 

Krishnamurti calls the screen a muddied pool of truth 
Join the Movies and See the World! Dorothy Manners 50 

Nick Stuart did — and has — and how! 

Some Figures From Fiction Visit Hollywood Elizabeth Petersen 52 

Juliet gives the lowdown on Clara Bow and Anna Moore wants to go to Greta Garbo's night school 

When Is a Story Stolen? Dorothy Calhoun 55 

This question has caused every picture company to have more suits than the Prince of Wales 

She's the Kind of Girl Men Don't Forget Gladys Hall 59 

Tigerish Mary Duncan is too enigmatic even for sophisticated Hollywood 

Believers in Santa Claus • Nancy Pryor 67 

Among them is Barbara Worth, who loves to dye Easter eggs and wants to do something-big-and-worth-while 

Hidden Wives Carolyn Dawson 68 

Of actors' marriages — is the less said the better? 

Making Life Louiseier Helen Louise Walker 71 

Miss Fazcnda's real profession is that of soul-doctor extraordinary 

No Mother to Guide Him , - Grace Kingsley 72 

With her passing passed J. Warren Kerrigan's interest in his life<vork 

Colin J. Cruickshank, Art Director Dorothy Donnell Calhoun, Western Editor 

Motion Picture Magazine is published monthly by Motion Picture Publications, Inc., at 18410 Jamaica 
Avenue, Jamaica, New York. Executive Offices, Paramount Building, 1501 Broadway, New York City. 
European agents, Atlas Publishing Company, 18, Bride Lane, London, E. C. 4. Entered as second- 
class matter at Post Office at Jamaica. N. Y '., under Act of March 3rd, 1879. George Kent Shuler, 
Pres. and Treas.; Duncan A. Dobie, Jr., Vice Pres.; Murray C. Bemays, Sec'y. Subscriptions for 
U. S., Cuba, Mexico and Philippines, $2.50 a year in advance. Canada, $3.00. Foreign countries, $3.50. 

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FIFTEEN-DOLLAR LETTER 

Let Us Cheer Them 

PROVIDENCE, R. I— To quote an 
expression frequently used by Alice White, 
some of these slamming letters "burn me 
up." My whole insides just get hot with 
indignation when I pick up my monthly 
movie magazines and read the opinions of 
hundreds of people who, if they were only 
to read the same letter, written by some- 
one else, would be as indignant as I am. 

They slam such wonderful pictures as 
"Camille" ; they even pick out little de- 
fects in screen revelations as "King of 
Kings" and "The Big Parade." And now, 
after seeing "The Legion of the Con- 
demned," I made up my mind that before 
I read anything I didn't like, I would send 
in my letter of praise and thus soothe my 
hurt feelings a bit. 

Never before have I seen a drama of 
such human interest and underlying de- 
votion as exhibited in "The Legion of the 
Condemned." I lived again, a romance I 
thought long since dead, with those two 
new Paramount finds, Fay Wray and Gary 
Cooper. And, here again, I will beat my 
critical foes by saying Fay was indeed 
quite small to be playing opposite Gary, 
but does that not make the story all the 
more real? How many times have you 
not seen a tall fellow and a slightly 
shorter girl ? But their size is of no in- 
terest, their acting was superb. And Barry 
Norton? If there ever was a "pretty" 
fellow, he sure is the one. He had only a 
small part, but I know he is capable of 
big things. 

Movies are no longer a luxury ; they 
have become a 
habit and a 
necessity. So 
again I say, 
three cheers for 
the movies and 
down with 
these slamming 
letters'. They 
don't help any 
and aren't pleas- 
ant to read. 
Quite sincerely, 

S. Frcelove. 



about "Ramona" in story and song, but 
wait until you see the motion picture. It 
defies words, description and exposition. 

Out of the thousands of machine-made 
pictures, it's great to see something like 
this. But when you have Edwin Carewe 
for director, Dolores del Rio, Warner 
Baxter and Roland Drew for the leading 
roles, proceed to enjoy yourself — you can 
sit back — knowing that you will see some- 
thing worth while. 

Never has Dolores del Rio been more 
beautiful, never more convincing than in 
this role, which calls upon her every emo- 
tion. My enthusiastic praise is well mer- 
ited ; go see for yourself. If anyone misses 
this glorious thing, he deserves to be 
hanged, drawn and quartered at his own 



expense . 



Yours truly, 

{Miss) Frances Kirivin. 



TEN- 
DOLLAR 
LETTER 
You Must See 
"Ramona" 

BRONX, 

NEW YORK— 
You have heard 



Prizes for Best Letters 



Each month Motion Picture Maga- 
zine will award cash prizes for the three 
best letters published. Fifteen dollars 
will be paid for the best letter, ten dol- 
lars for the second best, and five dollars 
for the third. If more than one letter is 
considered of equal merit, the full 
amount of the prize will go to each 
writer. 

So, if you've been entertaining any 
ideas about the movies and the stars, con- 
fine yourself to about 200 words or less, 
and let's know what's on your mind. 
Anonymous communications will not be 
considered and no letters will be re- 
turned. Sign your full name and ad- 
dress. We will use initials if requested. 
Address: Laurence Reid, Editor, Mo- 
tion Picture Magazine, Paramount 
Building, 1501 Broadway, New York City. 



FIVE-DOLLAR LETTER 
Would Like To Applaud at Movies 

PITTSBURGH, PA.— The moviegoer 
is being deprived of something very essen- 
tial to the complete enjoyment of any en- 
tertainment, which is the opportunity to 
express by applause his appreciation of 
those who are helping him forget the drab- 
ness of his every-day, prosaic existence. 
How often have I noticed, after the show- 
ing of a particularly meritorious picture, 
during which the audience has been rapt 
with interest, the instinctive raising of 
hands in preparation for applause and then 
the sudden lowering of hands as the folly 
of applauding on deaf ears is recognized. 
It is evident that this situation is a cause 

of much dissat- 
isfaction. 

My sugges- 
tion as a pos- 
sible remedy 
for this deplor- 
able condition 
is as follows : 
after the pic- 
ture has been 
completed, let 
the curtain fall 
momentarily 
and then rise on 
a scene show- 
ing the leading 
characters of 
that picture 
bowing to their 
audience. I am 
fairly certain 
that this scheme 
would be pro- 
ductive of a 
{Continued on 
page 118) 




Now I Understand 
Why We Never Have Anything 

-it was your big chance and you never opened your mouth" 



" l_^OR weeks you've been talking about 
*? 'getting up your nerve' to go in and 
tell Mr. Hutchins about your plan for 
marketing the new floor polish. And then 
last night between dances when he de- 
liberately came over to you and said, 'Well, 
Barnard, I think we've got a winner in 
this new floor polish,' you sort of wilted 
up and gulped, 'Yes, I think it's all right.' 

"I could have cried — 
I was so mad. It would 
have been so easy for you 
to answer, 'Mr. Hutchins, 
I've got an idea I'd like 
to tell you about — I've 
been giving a lot of study 
to this proposition and I 
think I've worked out a 
plan you'd be interested in. ' 

"That was your big 
chance — your opportunity 
to show him you had 
brains — and you hardly 
opened your mouth! Now 
I understand why you 
never get promoted — why 
we never have anything! 
You're actually afraid of 
your own voice — you are 
the smartest man in that organization — but 
no one would ever know it. You can't put 
your ideas across — can't stand up for your 
rights — you just let them use you for a door 
mat. Here we are still living in a dingy little 
four-room flat while all our old crowd have 
lovely homes out in the country. 

"And last night after you had gone to 
sleep I laid awake for hours and figured it all 
out. The only trouble with you is that you 
have no ability to express yourself — to say 

fe right thing at the right moment. Just 
e other day Alice Vaughn was telling me 



What 20 Minutes a Day 
Will Show You 



How to talk before your club or lodge 
How to propose and respond to toasts 
How to address board meetings 
How to make a political speech 
How to tell entertaining stories 
How to make after-dinner speeches 
How to converse interestingly 
How to write letters 
How to sell more goods 
How to train your memory 
How to enlarge your vocabulary 
How to develop self-confidence 
How to acquire a winning personality 
How to strengthen your will-power and 

ambition 
How to become a clear, accurate 

thinker 
How to develop your power of con- 
centration 
How tj be master of any situation 



that Jack used to be troubled the same 
way — and then he began training with 
the North American Institute of Chicago 
— at home in his spare time. It took only 
about twenty minutes a day and in no 
time at all he was able to give little talks 
at club meetings. In the last year he's 
had three promotions — all due, he says, 
to his ability to talk with ease and vigor. 

"Now, don't you think you 
ought to look into this new 
training — I bet that if you'd 
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scared to death — I'll wager 
you'll just about set the world 
on fire — you'll be made for life. 
I'm going to send for their free 
booklet, How to Work Won- 
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have lots of fun reading it 
together." 



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7 



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now any woman can be 




POWER over men that you 
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with face and figure. Actually hundreds of thousands of women, 
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But years ago Lucille Young undertook to probe one of nature's 
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Among Lucille Young's clientele were famous actresses, film stars, 
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And Now She Can 
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To her utter astonish- 
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EVERY FASCI- 
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Now, in half an hour, YOU can learn what it took Lucille Young 
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Those who know the arts of fascination so well — the famous film stars — help you realize the astounding secrets 
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8 



Power over Men 

dangerously fascinating 




The Course of Thousands of Lives is Changing 

Millions of women have already learned about this new power. 
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The book "How To Fascinate Men" gives you all the secret in- 
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You will want to succeed quickly, the very first time you. try. 
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An Astounding Introductory Offer 

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J>VV! 





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1 M ,.# 919 Lucille 

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\% . Jr Send me your COM - 

|i "" Jr PLETE offer of "How 

1 1 ;<-;"!- '■-■■'-'"''# to Fascinate Men" and 
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^r pay postman only $3.00 plus a 
# few cents postage. If not de- 
& lighted with results, I can return 
S^ everything within 10 days and re- 
At ceive my money back, without fail. 

f Name 



4f St. Address. 



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CLASSIC 



is the de luxe publication of the 
screen. It prides itself on its 
bright and attractive features — 
features which are off the beaten 
track. It is ever in search of 
new, original and fresh ideas. 
It believes in giving you the up- 
to-date slant on what's going on 
in the picture world. It's far 
ahead of the field, because it 
scores one journalistic beat after 
another. Its contributors are 
constantly writing new impres- 
sions. 

'Buy the 

CLASSIC 

for OCTOBER 

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The SMagazine With the 

Personality 




By MARION MARTONE 



Adoree, Renee — playing in Tide of Empire— Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Arlen, Richard — playing in .Beggars of Life — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Armstrong, Robert — playing in Show Folks — 
Pathe-De Mille Studio, Culver City, Cal. 

Arthur, George K. — playing in Brotherly Love — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Astor, Mary — playing in Heart to Heart — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Asther, Nils — playing in Her Cardboard Lover — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



Bancroft, George — playing in Docks of New York 
— Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Banky, Vilma — playing in The Awakening — 
Samuel Goldwyn Productions, De Mille Studios, 
Culver City, Cal. 

Barrymore, John — recently, completed Tempest — 
United Artists Studios, 1041 N. Formosa Ave., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Barrymore, Lionel — recently completed Road 
House — Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Barthelmess, Richard — playing in Out of the 
Ruins — First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Basquette, Lina — playing in Show Folks — Pathe- 
De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Baxter, Warner — plaving in Craig's Wife — Pathe- 
De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Beery, Noah — playing in Noah's Ark — Warner 
Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

Beery, Wallace — playing in Beggars of Life — Par- 
amount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Bellamy, Madge — playing in Mother Knows Best 
— Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Boles, John — playing in The Last Warning — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Borden, Olive — playing in Gang War — FBO 
Studios, 780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Bosworth, Hobart — recently completed The 
Sawdust' Paradise — Paramount Studios, 5451 Mara- 
thon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Bow, Clara — playing in The Fleet's In — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Bowers, John — recently completed Soft Living — 
Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Boyd, William — playing in The Love Song — 
United Artists Studios, 1041 No. Formosa Ave., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Brent, Evelyn — playing in The Mating Call — 
Caddo Productions, Hollywood, Cal. 

Brian, Mary — playing in The Sophomore — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Bronson, Betty — playing in The Singing Fool — 
Warner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Brook, CHve — playing in The Crime of Interference 
— Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Brooks, Louise — playing in Beggars of Life — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Brown, Johnny Mack — playing in Annapolis — 
Pathe-De Milie Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Burns, Edmund — playing in Phyllis of the Follies 
— Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 



Carol, Sue — playing in Captain Swagger — Pathe- 
De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Carr, Mary — plaving in Love Over Night — Pathe- 
DeMille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Carroll, Nancy — playing in The Water Hole — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Chandler, Lane — playing in The First Kiss — Par- 
amount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood. Cal. 

Chaney, Lon — playing in West of Zanzibar — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Chaplin, Charles — recently completed The Circus 
— Charles Chaplin Studios, 1420 La Brea Ave., Los 
Angeles. Cal. 

Cody, Lew — playing in The Single Man — Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



Collier, Jr., William- — playing in Tide of Empire — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Collyer, June — playing in Me, Gangster — Fox Stu- 
dios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Colman, Ronald — playing in The Rescue — 
Samuel Goldwyn Productions, De Mille Studios, 
Culver City, Cal. 

Compson, Betty — playing in The Barker — First 
National Studios. Burbank, Cal. 

Conklln, Chester — playing in The Sophomore — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Cooper, Gary — playing in The First Kiss — Para- 
mount Studios, 545 1 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Costello, Dolores — playing in Noah's Ark- — War- 
ner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

Costello, Helene — playing in The Midnight Taxi — 
Warner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Crawford, Joan — playing in Four Walls — Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



n The Rescue — Samuel 
De Mille Studios, Culver 



T"\amita, L1H — playing 
■*--' Goldwyn Productions 
City, Cal. 

Dana, Viola — playing in Lure of the Night Club — 
FBO Studios, 780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Dane, Karl — playing in Brotherly Love — Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios. Culver City, Cal. 

Daniels, Bebe — playing in Take Me Home — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Davles, Marlon — recently completed Her Card- 
board Lover — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. 

Day, Marceline — playing in Brotherly Love — Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Del Rio, Dolores — playing in Revenge — United Ar- 
tists Studios, 1041 No. Formosa Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Delaney, Charles — playing in After the Storm — 
Columbia Picture Corp., 1408 Cower St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Denny, Reginald — playing in The Night Bird — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Dix, Richard — playing in Moran of the Marines — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Dove, Billy — playing in His Wife's Affairs — 
First National Studios, Burbank. Cal. 

Dunn, Josephine — playing in The Singing Fool — 
Warner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Duryea, George — playing in Marked Money — 
Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



"Pairbanks, Douglas — recently completed TheGau- 
•*■ cho — Pickford-Fairbanks Studios, Hollywood, Cal. 

Farrell, Charles — playing in Backsivash — Fox Stu- 
dios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Fawcett, George — playing in The Mask of the 
Devil — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, 
Cal. 

Fazenda, Louise — playing in Noah's Ark — War- 
ner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Ferris, Audrey — playing in The Little Wildcat — 
Warner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Foxe, Earle — playing in None But the Brave — Fox 
Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 
* * * 

/"^aynor, Janet — recently completed The 4 Devils — 
^ J Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Garbo, Greta — playing in War In the Dark — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Gibson, Hoot — playing in Riding for Fame — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Gilbert, John — playing in The Mask of the Devil — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Grant, Lawrence — recently completed The 
Woman from Moscotv — Paramount Studios, 5451 
Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Gray, Lawrence — playing in Oh Kay! — First Na- 
tional Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Griffith, Corlnne — playing in The Divine Lady- 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

(Continued on page 12) 



10 




The pace that thrills 



* -h 



Yesterday, the auto * Today, radio and airplanes * Tomorrow— who knows what? * 
Travel by rockets? * Conversation with ]Uars? * Whatever it is, it will be faster * * Don't 
call it the pace that kills * It is the pace that gives life * It makes our lives better, 
fuller than any before in the world's history, because it stimulates us to pack every 
minute with action! * * Your entertainment, too, must keep pace with the times. * JVo 
wasted moments! * You want speed, action in your play and entertainment as well as 
in your work * To please you now, of course, your picture show must be quick-moving, 
snappy, exhilarating * And it will be if you pick the show that has plenty of good short 
novelty, comedy and news subjects. * * You are surest of action and entertainment all 
through the show when you see the Educational Pictures trade-mark, because a Short 
Feature has to foe crammed with action, and has to reach the highest level of entertain- 
ment quality, to "make" the Educational line-up * For Educational is the world's 
greatest producer-distrifoutor of Short Features 5 the only foig company dealing exclu- 
sively in this type of entertainment * * You know what fun Lupino Lane, "Big Boy" 
and the other popular Educational Pictures comedy stars add to a program * Their 
pictures are faster, funnier this season * And typical of what Educational has in store 
for you this year are the new "Buss Farr ell, Aviator" pictures with Beed Bowes * Watch 
for these flying thrillers * There's speed, action, excitement 
for you! * * Educational Pictures always make a good 
show better. 





PRESIDENT 



* 



% 



JLUPIiVO LANE 

in Lupino Lane Comedies 

TUXEDO COMEDIES 

(Jack White Productions) 



KHVORRAM8 

First among NEWS REELS 




IDEAL COMEDIES 

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Bid KOY 

in Big Boy-Juvenile Comedies 

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DOROTHV DEVORE olJK WORLD TODAV 

in Dorothy Devore Comedies A Modern Screen Magazine 



CAMEO COMEDIES 
EnjJCAITIOJVAIj FMJL.1M EXCHANGES, MJTC., Executive Offices: 1501 Broadway, JVete York, JV. IT 



11 



He Gives You 
A. New Skin 

Smooth, Clear and Beautiful 




**- 




On Any Part of Your Face, Neck, 
Arms, Hands, Body 



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In the Starry Kingdom 

(Continued from page 10) 



H a 



"aines, William — playing in Alias Jimmy 
Valentine — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Cul- 
ver City, Cal. 

Hale, Alan — playing in Marked Money — Pathe- 
De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Hall, James — playing in The Fleet's In — Para- 
mount Studios, 545 1 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Hamilton, Neil — playing in Take Me Home — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Haver, Phyllis — playing in Sal of Singapore — 
Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Hersholt, Jean — playing in The Battle of the Sexes, 
— United Artists Studios, 1041 No. Formosa Ave., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Hines, Johnny — playing in The Wright Idea — Tec- 
Art Studios, 5350 Melrose Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Holt, Jack — playing in The Water Hole — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Hoxie, Jack — playing in Men of Daring — Universal 
Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Hughes, Lloyd — playing in Heart to Heart — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Hyams, Leila — playing in Land of the Silver Fox 
— Warner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

* * * 

Jannings, Emil — playing in Sins of the Fathers — 
Paramount Studios, 545 1 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Jolson, Al— playing in The Singing Fool — Warner 
Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

Joy, Leatrice — recently completed The Bellamy 
Trial — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, 

Cal. 

* * * 

Keaton, Buster — playing in The Cameraman — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, 
Cal. 

Kent, Barbara — playing in The Shakedown — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Kent, Larry — playing in The Head Man — Fox 
Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Kenyon, Doris — recently completed The Hawk's 
Nest — First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Kerry, Norman — recently completed The Woman 
From Moscmv— Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon 
St., Hollywood, Cal. 

* * * 

Langdon, Harry — playing in Heart Trouble — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Lake, Arthur — playing in The Air Circus — Fox 
Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

La Plante, Laura — playing in The Last Warning — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

La Rocque, Rod — playing in Captain Swagger — 
Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Lloyd, Harold — recently completed Speedy — 
Harold Lloyd Productions, 1040 Las Palmas Ave., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Loff, Jeannette — playing in Annapolis — Pathe- 
De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Logan, Jacqueline — recently completed Power — 
Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Lorraine, Louise — playing in The Wright Idea — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Love, Bessie — playing in The Matinee Idol — 
Columbia Pictures Corp., 1408 Gower St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Lowe, Edmund — playing in Making the Grade — 
Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Loy, Myrna — playing in State Street Sadie — War- 
ner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

Luden, Jack — recently completed The Woman 
From Moscow — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon 
St., Hollywood, Cal. 

* * * 

MacDonald, Farrell — playing in Me, Gangster — 
Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Mackaill, Dorothy — playing in Waterfront — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Maynard, Ken — playing in The Phantom City — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

McAvoy, May — playing in The Terror — Warner 
Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

McCoy, Tim — playing in Morgan's Last Raid — - 
IVJetro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

McGregor, Malcolm — playing in The Girl on the 
Barge — Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. . 

McLaglen, Victor — playing in The River Pirate — 
Fox Studios, 1.101 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Meighan, Thomas — playing in The Mating Call 
— Caddo Productions, Hollywood, Cal. 

Menjou, Adolphe — playing in His Private Life — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Moore, Colleen — playing in Oh Kay! — First Na- 
tional Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Moran, Lois — playing in Making the Grade — Fox 
Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Moreno, Antonio — playing in The Midnight Taxi 
— Warner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Morton, Charles — playing in None But the Brave 
— Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Mulhall, Jack — playing in Waterfront — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Murray, Charles — playing in Do Your Duty — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Murray, James — playing in The Shakedown— 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 



N a 



[age!, Conrad — playing in War in the Dark — Me- 

• tro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Negri, Pola — recently completed The Woman 
From Moscow — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon 
St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Nilsson, Anna Q. — playing in The Whip — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Nissen, Greta — recently completed The Butter and 
Egg Man — First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Nixon, Marian — playing in Out of the Ruins — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Norton, Barry — playing in Mother Knows Best — 
Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Novarro, Ramon — playing in Gold Braid — Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Nugent, Eddie — playing in The Single Man — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



O'Brien, George — playing in Noah's Ark- — Warner 
Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

O'Day, Molly — recently completed The Butter and 
Egg Man — First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

O'Neil, Sally — playing in The Girl on the Barge — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Oland, Warner — recently completed Stand and 
Deliver — Pathe-De Mille Productions, Culver City, 
Cal. 

Olmstead, Gertrude — playing in The Hit of the 
Show — FBO Studios, 780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 



Philbln, Mary — playing in Salvage — Universal 
Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Pickford, Mary — recently completed My Best 
Girl — Pickford-Fairbanks Studios, Hollywood, Cal. 

Powell, William — playing in The Canary Murder 
Case — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Prevost, Marie — recently completed The Godless 
Girl— Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Pringle, Aileen — playing in The Single Man — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



Ralston, Esther — recently completed The Sawdust 
Paradise — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon 
St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Ralston, Jobyna — playing in The Night Flyer — 
Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Ray, Charles — recently completed The Garden of 
Eden — United Artists Studios, Hollywood, Cal. 

Reynolds, Vera — recently completed Walking 
Back — Pathe-De Mille Studios. Culver City, Cal. 

Rich, Irene — playing in Craig's Wife — Pathe-De 
Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Rogers, Charles (Buddy) — playing in The 
Sophomore — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Roland, Gilbert — playing in Craig's Wife — Pathe- 
De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



Schildkraut, Rudolph — recently completed Tenth 
Avenue — Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, 
Cal. 

Sebastian, Dorothy — playing in Morgan's Last 
Raid — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, 
Cal. 

Shearer, Norma — playing in The Little Angel — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Sills, Milton — playing in Hard Rock — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Steele, Bob — playing in Lightning Speed — FBO 
Studios, 780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Swanson, Gloria — playing in The Swamp — 
F. B. O. Studios, 780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 



nPalmadge, Norma — recently completed The 
*■ Woman Disputed — United Artists Studios, 1041 
No. Formosa Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Taylor, Ruth — playing in The Canary Murder 
Case — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Thomson, Fred — playing in Kit Carson — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Todd, Thelma — playing in Heart to Heart — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Tryon, Glenn — playing in The Kid's Clever — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Tyler, Tom — playing in Gun Law — FBO Studios, 
780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 



■\7alH, Virginia— playing in The Escape — Fox 
* Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Varconi, Victor — playing in The Divine Lady — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Velez, Lupe — playing in The Love Song — United 
Artists Studios, 1041 No. Formosa Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Veidt, Conrad — recently completed The Man Who 
Laughs — Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Vidor, Florence — recently completed The Magni- 
ficent Flirt — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

* * * 



indsor, Claire — playing in The Clash— Tiffany 
Productions, 933 No. Seward St., Hollywood, 



w 

Cal 

Wray, Fay — playing in The First Kiss — Paramount 
Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 



12 



Style 

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Name. 



Address . 

Town State. 



13 



. mi 



Wkere Summer 

Is Cool 
Enchantment 

"The Ambassador is one 
of the most beautiful 
places I know of I" 

MADAME 
GAIXI 
CURCI 

— declares in one of a large 
numberofUNSOLICITED 
COMMENTS by world fa- 
mous celebrities. 

"Certainly no hotel lo- 
cated in any large city 
has such extensive and 
beautiful grounds." 

For keenest enjoyment of your 

summer visit to California, 

make reservations at — 



Los Angeles 

NO HOTEL IN THE WORLD 
OFFERS MORE VARIED 
ATTRACTIONS— Superb 27- 
acre park, with miniature golf 
course, open air plunge and 
tennis courts. Riding, hunting 
and all sports, including 18- 
holeRancho Golf Club. Motion 
picture theatre and 35 smart 
shops within the hotel. Famous 
Cocoanut Grove for dancing 
nightly. 

Write for Chefs Cook-book 
of California Recipes 

ATTRACTIVE SUMMER RATES 



BEN L. FRANK 

Manager 



29-b 




"C^onquest" has been chosen as the title 
for John Barrymore's next picture. 
Camilla Horn will again be his leading 
lady. 



the screen in John Gilbert's current ve- 
hicle for Metro-Goldwyn, "The Mask of 
the Devil." Alma Rubens and Ralph 
Forbes are in the cast too. 



"The production of "The Play Goes On," 
.which Paul Fejos will direct, will pre- 
cede "The Charlatan," which was previ- 
ously announced as his next picture. 



[ Jniversal has purchased the motion pic- 
^ ture rights to Inez Gregg's story, 
"Why Girls Walk Home," which presents 
a new angle to the familiar theme. 



In t his next starring picture for Caddo, 
Thomas Meighan will have two leading 
ladies, Evelyn Brent and Renee Adoree, 
both popular stars in their own right. It 
is Rex Beach's "The Mating Call" and 
will be directed by James Cruze. 



A society and underworld drama, "Say 
^^ It with Sables," a Columbia picture, 
will shortly go into production with Fran- 
cis X. Bushman, Helene Chadwick, Mar- 
garet Livingston and Arthur Rankin in 
the cast. 



Preparations are now being made by 
Inspiration Pictures to film "She Goes 
to War," the woman's side of the big con- 
flict. Howard Estabrook is adapting this 
Rupert Hughes story and Henry King will 
direct. 



17 W. Murnau, the Fox director, is mak- 
* ing preparations to start his next pic- 
ture, "Our Daily Bread." 



The role of Mary Bell in Universal's 
"The Border Wildcat" will be played 
by Kathryn McGuire, the Wampas Baby 
star, in support of Ted Wells, who is 
starring. 



IV/Tillard Webb will direct "Trial Mar- 
riage," Elizabeth Alexander's serial 
story, which treats the new trend in mar- 
riage from a different point of view, for 
Columbia. 



Dhilip Strange, the English picture star, 
A will play the role of a Spanish noble- 
man, D'Alcacer, in Joseph Conrad's "The 
Rescue," in which Ronald Colman is 
starred, with Lili Damita playing oppo- 
site him. Vilma 
Banky, Colman's 
former team-mate 
and now an inde- 
pendent star, is 
making ''The 
Awakening." 



H 



erbert Brenon 
will produce 
"Lummox," Fan- 
nie Hurst's novel, 
as one of his inde- 
pendent produc- 
tions for JJnited 
Artists' release. 



Cay Wray, the 
Paramount star, 
is now Mrs. John 
Monk Saunders, 
meaning that Fay 
was recently mar- 
ried to Mr. Saun- 
ders, author of 
"Wings." 




]\/[ary Pickford's fans will be shocked 
to learn that when Mary stopped in 
Chicago, on her way back to California, 
she had her famous blonde curls cut off. 
However, we has- 
ten to tell her fans 
that her bob is 
very becoming. 



J-Jarry Lang- 
don's new com- 
edy, formerly 
called ''Here 
Comes the Band," 
is now titled 
"Heart Trouble." 



"Into the Depths, 
the story of a 
submarine disaster, 
has gone into pro- 
duction at Colum- 
bia Studios with 
Jack Holt, Ralph 
Graves and Doro- 
thy Reyier in the 
cast and Irvin 
Willat directing. 



• 



J 



A fter a long ab- 
•^sence, Theodore 
Roberts returns to 



In "Noah's Ark" George O'Brien plays one 

of the most important parts of the sledgendary 

characters 



OHNNY HlNES IS 

making plans to 
film "The Girl 
Friend" with sound 
effects at the Tec- 
Art Studios. 



14 



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Hollywood 
BghtandDay 



AAFlatertiub 




Wonder what a street-cleaner would 
do if he saw a horse on the Boule- 
vard ?-black grease spots from an 
orchid limousine mstead-Tom Ma 
going down the Boulevard in one of 
his many yellow cars— Ray Griffith 
just "act/from Europe with his bride, 
nize beby— straw hats— flannel trou- 
sers-Alice White flirting-Sue Carol 
without Nick Stuart-whatever be- 
came of Eugene O'Brien ?-Japs i and 
lawn-mowers and Fords go hand in 
hand-one-legged actor with a smile- 
sign over a restaurant: Don t eat! 
Wait for our grand opening -how can 
women wear furs on a day like this?- 
why does Ona Brown call everybody 
■■dearie"? — Ben Lyon and Marian 
Nixon dodging a street-car-high-toned 
barber shops with red leather chair s- 
haven't seen Mike Cudahy for weeks- 
sight-seeing bus filled with people from 
Los Angeles-four times as many 
blondes as red-heads-four times a, 
many red-heads as brunettes-I used to 
lTke brunettes the best-t sttfl do- 
store-keepers peering hopefully from 
behind "shoppe" windows-man in a 
Prince Albert looking hungry— Jim 
Tully-more could be said on that sub- 
ject— Doug Fairbanks, Jr. with his 
secretary, a boy from Kalamazoo, 
Michigan-why so many bank build- 
ings where everybody's broke-lots so 
clinking and sirens probably the Fire 
Chief going to lunch— pint-sized Pome 
ranian towing a 250-pound .mama - 
what does an extra eat on his $7.bU a 
day?— S7.50 a day once a week— 
SAY'!! what DOES a street-cleaner 
think about ANYHOW??????????? 



"Cowboy Hotel" is the low-class 

name given a lower-class dwelling place 
down on Cahuenga by the laundry 
H«e is where the cowboy extras 
live The "pony express" boys who 
work in an occasional Western picture 
Cheap rents and cheaper restaurants 
make the place attractive to the rodeo 
^cianlts * "Cowboy Hotel" has seen 
murders and near-murders. ^ ,s 
payable in advance-always Too much 
has been lost "on the cuff." Fights are 
common. These outdoor gents battle 
at the wave of a handkerchief. You 
Income over! Once the hotel housed 
many types, but now you just gotta be 
toSh The familiar cow-puncher with 
his boots and beard and two-bits makes 
the whole side of the street, colorful. 
Some^ of Hollywood's unsolicited tour- 
ist atmosphere. 



This "pay-as-you-enter" business, 

however, does not apply to actors in the 
Setter class hotels. A dollar now and 
a dollar when they work is their forte 
And the managers like it! They have 
to' Tourists like to live where actors 
"stoo" (Oi Yoi!! Ve gotten hev de 
•hecters.) Here's one: The manager 
of a little hotel on the Boulevard told 
me that he went up to Room 604 the 
other day to oust a young juvenile who 




A close-up of John Monk Saunders and 
Fay Wray close up. Why doesn t he 
marry the girl? He did-not long ago, 
£ Maryland 8 while "The First Kiss com- 
pany was on location. John and Fay did 
their share of work, apparently 

was about six months in arrears. The 
kid gave him a great sales talk about 
"hat job coming up next week" and a 
couple of sympathy subtitles When 
the manager came out he was minu 
his rent and twenty dollars in cash! 

* * * 

The hotels really stand for a lot- 
but they draw the line at scandal ! 
Murder and suicide are taboo! lhey 
aren't popular in the front families this 
season-so the hotels put on the kibosh. 
Sides Se bad publicity which often 
results from such "kid-play, it some 
times costs them real dough. An actor 
committed suicide in a back room of 
small actors' hostelry. The room is 
now closed. No actor will rent it! 



It seems the most important persons 

attached to the studios are the office 
boys After they get through uping 
you and "downing" you the producers 
seem just like your oltcn time pell. 
Down at Fox, however they reduced 
the boys a peg. Brass-buttoned uni- 
forms were provided for them-to- 
crether with the little frying-pan caps 
strapped under the chin. But it's like 
trying to put Mussolini in his place. 
What's the use? They're working as 
bell hops in the movies now. 
* * * 
Hollywood Boulevard will never be 
a "Great White Way"— it is fast be- 
coming the "Little Blue-and-Red Lane- 
Each little shop and theater and gas 
station has one of these piercing new 
signs. They look like a red-hot wire 
in a glass tube-red, blue and some- 
tunes green. T^e funniestdookmg s^gn 
on the Boulevard reads : HUL Y W uuu 
EL CTR C COMPANY-isn't that the 
irony of life for you? 

# * * 

The movies and their stars have 

caused the City of Los Angeles to pass 
strange new ordinances. lnc fl[St 
make? it a felony to unnecessarily in- 
cite (or excite) the police or fire de 
nartments It seems the press-agents 
werTca n- out the squads at various 
S hour -just to get their baby star 
ofthe front page. The Sec^ make 
it impossible for anyone to get a pol ice 
escort, unless three-quarters of the Uty 
Counsel agree, And that wil *«£ 
haonen (that is, it never has!), bo 
now Susie will have to ride home a 1 
alone; no officers, no sirens, no nothm 

— 's tough! 

* * * 

"Souvenir hunters" take heavy tolTta 

Hollywood. Screen stars, parking their 
cars near the studios, take their in- 
surance in their hands. One prominent 
masculine lover left his foreign-make 
vehicle unprotected for two hours 
Upon his return, he found the motor 
rneter steering-gear ball and other 
Various and sundry knick-knacks miss- 
incr He also found notes from ad- 
mirers (?) explaining that they had 
Taken the' "what-nots" as souvenirs. 
Nice bunch of guys, ehr" 

* * * 
Wild Saturday night in Hollywood! 

Si™ on the Hollywood Boulevard en- 
t S r?nce°of the Roolevelt Hotel at twelve 
o'clock: "Please use side door and 
BE QUIET !" Whoops, my dear^ 




16 









JOHN GILBERT 

in 
"The Cossacks" 



"We can get seats for that picture across the street 5 
"I'D RATHER STAND ON LINE AND SEE THIS 
METRO -GOLDWYN- MAYER PICTURE - 
THEY'RE ALWAYS GOOD." 



ISN'T IT 

THE 

TRUTH! 

YOU'RE always sure 

OF seeing 
THE biggest stars 
THE finest stories 
WHEN your theatre 
SHOWS you 
M - G - M pictures 




WILLIAM HAINES 

in 
"Telling the World" 



■HBiKra 
MARION DAV1ES 

in 
"Her Cardboard 
Lower" 





WHITE SHADOWS 

IN THE SOUTH SEAS 

WITH 

MONTE BLUE and 

RAQUEL TORRES 



JOHN GILBERT 

in 
'Four Walls" 



METRO-GC 

"More Stars than there are in Heaven" 





LEO'S 

QUESTION 

CONTEST 



Leo, the Metro - Goldwyn - Mayer Lion, is 
staging a question contest of his own. He 
offers two $50 prizes — one to the cleverest 
man, one to the cleverest woman, fpr 
the best answers to his questions. HKa 
And furthermore Leo will present j» ™ 
autographed photographs of him- ™ «B 
self for the fiftv next best sets of Leo , 
answers. * is n,s,rH 

LEO'S QUESTIONS 

INarae three famous animals in Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer pictures and Hal Roach comedies. 
■J What popular song bears the same name as a 
£* current M-G-M picture? 

3 Which M-G-M featured player, not yet starred, 
do you consider most worthy of stardom? Tell 
why in not more than 75 words. 

4" Name three famous M-G-M "teams" of actors. 

J What are five of Bill Haines' picture successes? 
Write your answers on one side of a single sheet 
of paper and mail to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1542 
Broadway, New York. All answers must be received 
by September 15th. Winners' names will be published 
in a later issue of this magazine. 

Note: If you do not attend the pictures yourself you 
may question your friends or consult motion picture 
magazines. In event of ties, each tying contestant 
will be awarded a prize identical in character with 
that tied for. 

Winners of Contest of June, 1928 
Mrs. John D. Jesk, 214 E. 51st Street, New York City 

Charles Churchill, P. O. Box 316 
Carson City, Nevada 



N-MAYER 



17 



mm 



Mf 



Coming Pathe P ict 



ures 



<•<•> 



'ANNAPOLIS" 
ROD LA ROCQUE 

in 

"LOVE OVER NIGHT" 

auction. Dir,P,!.J U i; nbu11 P ™" 
Griffith. ectedb y Edward H. 

BEATRICE JOY 
"MAN-MADE WOMEN" 



M 



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v/. . / 



Coming Pathe Pictures 

"TENTH AVENUE" 
uith PHYLLIS HAVER 

Victor Varconi 
and Joseph Schildkraut 
A William C. deMille Production. Pro- 
duced by DeMille Pictures Corporation. 

WILLIAM BOYD 
in "THE COP" 

with Alan Hale, Jacqueline Logan 
and Robert Armstrong 
A Donald Crisp Production. Produced 
by Ralph Rlock for DeMille Pictures 
Corporation. 

James Cruze, Inc. presents 
"THE RED MARK" 

with Nena Quartaro, Gaston Glass, 
Gustave Von Seyffertitz and Rose 
Dione. Personally directed fry James 
Cruze. 










: fe' 



FOR the new season Pathe has cornered the 
market on Youth and Beauty — players with 
color, dash, beauty, personality! Pathe's stars 
and players are youthful —comers — typifying 
today. 

There's Lina Basquette, Jeanette Loff, Lili Da- 
mita, Nena Quartaro, Sue Carol, Phyllis Haver, 
Leatrice Joy, Marie Prevost, Jacqueline Logan. 

And William Boyd, George Duryea, Robert 
Armstrong, Junior Coghlan, Victor Varconi, 
Joseph Schildkraut, John Mack Brown, Eddie 
Quillan, Alan Hale. 

Here are names that sparkle, that connote big 
scenes, fine roles, worthwhile pictures. 
PATHE HAS THEM. 



18 




." 




*v*x*a*t#r 



E. R. Richee 



We shouldn't advise the Navy Department to co-operate too heartily when Clara Bow 

begins making "The Fleet's In," because it will take the combined Army and Marine 

Corps to get the. boys back on board again 







Lansing Brown 



The adding machine isn't made that could compute the number of girls who would start 
afoot for Hollywood if given a chance to play opposite Lloyd Hughes in a picture with 
a title such as "Heart to Heart." Or of men who could do the same to substitute for 

him, for his leading woman is Mary Astor 



I 




Russell Ball 



When people first heard Constance Talmadge's name associated with "The Last of Mrs. 

Cheney," they w.ere prone to remark that they weren't surprised, because there was no 

reason why this fellow Cheney should last any longer than the other husbands 




Spurr 



Can it be that Ronald Colman was in genuine danger of being lost without his Vilma to 
play opposite? The situation at least would seem to have been precarious, for feminine 
first aid has been rushed from Paris in the person of Lili Damita. And the title of their 

first photoplay is to be "The Rescue" 




R. H. Louise 



The name of Lillian Gish's next picture is "Wind." And most assuredly it cannot be an 

ill one. For it will waft before us upon the screen again the prim yet not displeasing 

charm of one of the cinema'* most earnest actresses 




Melbourne Spurr 



The only star who parts her hame but not her hair in the middle is Anna Q. Nilsson. 

And incidentally, how many in the classroom know what the isolated letter stands for? 

What, no one! Well, just to satisfy your quriosity, we'll tell you: Querentia 




Lansing Brown 



LofF at first sight is the characteristic reaction after a glance at Jeanette. Partly because 

of her beauty, partly because of her ability. But chiefly because, like so many 

Scandinavians, she has a Norway with her 







E. R. Richee 



To distinguish him from the dour Brother Noah, it is only necessary now to say you mean 

the cheery Beery when you're talking about Wallace. And you probably will be after 

you have seen his performance in "Beggars of Life" 



Stf 



P 11 B» 



7^£ Screen Magazine of Authority 





Major George K. Shuler, Publisher 



September, 1928 



Duncan A. Dobie, Jr., General Manager 



Laurence Reid, Managing Editor 



Camera! 



M 



UCH has been said concerning the effect of the 
talkies upon the present stars and starlets of the 
screen. It has been pointed out that the quali- 
ties of the voices of many of them are unsuitable 
for theatrical speech, and that they must choose between 
studying elocution and suffering oblivion. It has been 
prophesied, too, that foreign stars must necessarily cease 
to stake out claims in the celluloid El Dorado of Holly- 
wood. It has furthermore been forecast that players 
from the speaking stage, the favorites of the New York 
playhouses, will forthwith come into demand and supplant 
the present inarticulate idols. 

Much, too, has been conjectured about the effect of the 
talkies upon the producers. It has been offered as an 
opinion that the exporting of audible productions cannot 
practically be accomplished. They are being made in 
English, and more particularly, American English ; and 
commentators have been quick to indicate that these can- 
not be understood in any country unaccustomed to such 
a language. This is only one and a representative remark. 

What About the Fans? 

ut in all the talk about the talkies, this is noticeable : 
that very little has been said about their effect upon 
those most important of all people in the scheme of the 
motion picture world : the fans themselves. 

What are the talkies going to do to them ? 

For one thing, it seems most probable, the talkies are 
going to exact at the start certainly a great deal of pa- 
tience. There is no doubt that the invention of speak- 
ing movies is here and here to stay. And there is no 
doubt that the major mechanical difficulties have been 
surmounted. But it is one thing to have invented a prac- 
tical automobile and another to have refined it to a point 
where many may drive it a thousand miles or so without 
ever so much as having to lift the hood. So with the 
talkies : it is likely to be some time before every theater 
showing them will have succeeded in so perfecting its 
projection of sight and sound as to make them run per- 
fectly and unnoticeably. There is likely to be a recur- 
rence of the situations which used to bring' "One Minute 
to Change Reels" to the screen. The fans are very prob- 
ably going to be subjected to quite a bit of irritation. But 
this will pass with the removal of its causes. For they 
will be removed ; the technical skill of makers of motion 



pictures has always been of the very highest order and it 
will overcome the new problems as completely as in the 
past it has overcome the old. 

Take Your Tolerance With You 

Tt would be well, therefore, when witnessing the first few 
talkies, to go prepared for incomplete satisfaction. Not 
that any of them will be anything but as carefully made as 
possible, but because, with the invention in its very early 
infancy, there is bound to be present in its practical func- 
tioning a certain amount of imperfection. There- was in 
the phonograph, there was in the radio ; there is in the 
talkies. But it should be remembered that as the first 
two devices improved, so will the third. Competition and 
the necessity of perfecting the mechanics will soon smooth 
out the wrinkles. The talkies are a great idea ; let us give 
them a chance to prove it. 

It Might Be G. B. Shaw 

TThe entry of George Bernard Shaw into the talkies sug- 
*■ gests possibilities. They say that in his initial ap- 
pearance he gives an imitation of Mussolini that is nearly 
as funny as the Duce himself. And this may mean that 
there has been uncovered a new great character actor. 
There are only too few. We have Lon Chaney and Jean 
Hersholt and Emil Jannings. The next time Samuel 
Goldwyn goes abroad, let him stop in London on his way 
to the Continent and sign George up. 

But the success of Shaw's performance is more than 
a personal achievement for him. It affords convincing 
proof of the practicability of the medium itself. It shows 
what the talkies can do. 

For in the picture in which he appeared and spoke, there 
was a noticeable improvement in the reproduction of 
sound. Not only the novelist's voice, with its every 
nuance of accent and tone, was clearly and pleasantly 
audible, but other sounds — such as the crunch of his foot- 
steps on the gravel walk which led him into the picture. 
The whole thing made the absent performer seem very 
really present. 

Given reproduction of sound as natural as this, given 
a play written expressly for talkie presentation, and given 
professional actors, it would appear that if fans need at 
first be a little tolerant of the new medium, they need 
not long be. 

27 




utchering 



An Author in Hollywood 



By Winnifred Eaton Reeve 
(Onoto Watanna) 



Ti 



HE train from New York is due. 
Hollywood prepares to make one of its 
typical publicity gestures. Not, it is 
true, of the magnitude or hysterical 
and blatant quality such as is accorded a 
Star, a Movie Executive or a Peaches 
Browning, but, taken all in all, a nice refined 
little hullabaloo. After all, it is only an 
Eminent Author who is arriving in Holly- 
wood. He is met at the train by cameramen, 
reporters, a star or two, maybe a director, 
perhaps even the Mayor and a bunch of 
minor and major Movie folk that the pub- 
licit}- director has managed to round up 
for the occasion. 

For a few days at least our Eminent 
Author basks in the sunshine and favor 
of the City of Props. He is wined and 
dined, photographed, touted, exploited, in- 
terviewed, quoted, misquoted. Every 
prospect pleases. He has a remarkable 
p.&a. contract in his pocket. Five hundred dol- 
lars a week for the first three months ; 
seven hundred and fifty dollars for 
the next six ; one thousand dollars a 
week for the next year and so on ad 
nauseam. Small wonder that he gives 
forth an interview to the effect that he 
is charmed with Hollywood and 
intends to devote the rest of his 
literary life to the Great Art of 
Motion Pictures. 

Like fun he is ! At the end of 
the three months, he will get a 
little note to the effect that the 
option on his contract is not 
to be exercised by the Pro- 
ducer. 

To one author who remains 
in Hollywood, there are a 
score who make their silent 
exit at the end of the three 
months. Not all go silently. 
Many fare forth shooting ver- 
bal fireworks behind them. 
"The survival of the fittest" 
does not apply in Hollywood, so far as authors are concerned. 
The touchstone to success is not creative brains, talent or in- 
ventive genius. The inspirational writer, however big his 
dreams and his product, cannot hope to compete with those 
possessed of sharp wits, craft, salesmanship, pull, politics and 
the thousand and one petty tricks that contribute to one's influ- 
ence in this game. 

About a week after his arrival our Eminent Author finds 
himself parked in an ugly little office in a noisy rackety- 




enry 



At the top: He 
Irving Dodge, then 
Clarence Budington 
Kelland, Carl Van 
Elinor Glyn and 
Hergesheimer 



Vechten, 
Joseph 




rains 



Is as a Lamb in an Abattoir 



packetty building. (Some studios are be- 
ginning to grant the authors offices as good 
as the secretaries of the executives). The 
refined hullabaloo aforementioned has be- 
come a thing of the dazzling past. Our 
author has been patted on the back for the 
last time. 

An Original by Susy Swipes 

I— Ie sits in his office and scans, with bulg- 
ing eyes, his first assignment. He is 
presently either convulsed with wild mirth 
or is stricken dumb with incoherent 
wrath. He has been assigned to adapt 
and treat an ''original" by one Susy 
Swipes or Davy Jones of Hollywood. 
It is an amazing, an incredible docu- 
ment. Its language is almost beyond 
credence. It is a nightmare patchwork 
that contains incidents and characters 
and gags and plots of a hundred or 
more stories that are horribly reminis- 
cent to the Eminent Author. 

A wise and prudent Eminent Author 
will set right to work upon Susy's or 
Davy's story. Sometimes, however, he 
bolts out of his office and dashes across 
the lot to the opulent administration 
building, where in ornately luxurious 
offices the favorites and powers that be 
hold forth. 

"Fools rush in where angels fear to 
tread." "Whom the gods destroy they 
first make mad." Alas! How sadly 
these adages apply to the Eminent 
Author in Hollywood as he forces his 
way into the sanctum sanctorum of a su- 
pervisor, or even such movie royalty as 
a producer. 

Let us draw a kindly veil over what 
ensues. We will change the subject. 

Talking about supervisors. Some are 
human beings, speaking the author's 
own language, possessed of a sense of 
humor, keen, sympathetic and kind. 
Others belong to that clan that a de- 
parting author (was it not Will 
Irwin?) quaintly dubbed "the dese and 
dose and dem boys." These bright 
young fellows sometimes mistake 
Maeterlinck for a patent medicine and 
have been known to reject a story by 
Victor Hugo because he "keeps a res- 
taurant down town." Usually they 
have a low opinion of authors, consider 
them pests and bugs and duck out of 
their way when they see one coming. 
{Continued on page 110) 




Ricliee 



At the bottom: 
Jean Nathan, 
Michael Arlen, 
Loos, Laurence 
ings and Irvin S. 



then 
Anita 
Stall- 
Cobb 




Jjobbed White 



So far as her hair is concerned, you can take it 
from Alice White that it won't be long now — or 
ever. In the face of the growing fancy for the 
growing out of tresses, Alice stoutly insists upon 
remaining in what some woman has termed the 
estate of shingle blessedness 



30 








Ure Summer 

Flirtations Dangerous? 

The Men in the Movies Say Yes 
The Girls Say Nonsense 

By Ruth Tildesley 



THEY say that summer is the silly season. 
Perhaps that's why summer and flirtations are 
interchangeable terms in this land of the free- 
and-easy. 

Now and then a wedding ring is discovered at 
the end of a lovers' lane ; sometimes the first frost 
brings complete forgetfulness to both players of the 
game of sham romance ; and occasionally a broken 
heart is left upon the sands after the gay parasols 
have been packed away for the winter. 

Are summer flirtations dangerous? 

"I've heard that 'apple pie without cheese is like 
a kiss without a squeeze,' " laughs Jacqueline Logan, 
"Just so a summer vacation without a flirtation is 
not recreation. The flirtation is the seasoning that 
brings out the flavor of the dish. There is, of 
course, danger. It is possible that one may fall in 
love seriously. But that would happen anyway and 
I don't think the summer flirtation should be held 
to blame." 

Two of "Hell's Angels" — Ben Lyon and James 
Hall — violently disagree on the subject. 

"Flirtations are dangerous at all times," says 
Ben, firmly. "I don't see where the weather enters 
into it at all. Give a woman half a chance, in June 
or December, and if she is interested in the flirta- 
tious male, he had better watch out ! 'The female 
of the species is more deadly than the male.' The 
man who invented that line didn't qualify it one bit. 
He knew his romance. 

Weather Thwarts No Woman 

"The poets harp about spring — and a man is sup- 
*■ posed to be more susceptible in May than in 
September. But no practical woman follows any 
{Continued on page 108) 



Beginning at the left end of the horseshoe : Carmel Myers, Ben 
Lyon, Mrs. Wallace Reid, William Haines, Dale Fuller, Andres 
de Segurola, Laura La Plante, Fritzi Ridgway, Charlie Byer, 
Marian Nixon, George Fawcett, Virginia Valli, Louise Fazenda, 
and Jacqueline Logan 





31 






f* 




32 



Acting Ad Liberty 

One great test of a trouper, they say, is the ability — when someone else in the scene forgets his lines 
or his business — to find something plausible to say or do — to act ad lib. Which puts Joan Crawford 
at the head of the class, for here, and with the utmost ease, she goes this one better and acts ad liberty 



w 





'ng JDaby 



ingle 




Ben Lyon 
Is All for His 
Mother and All Against 
Marriage, Companionate 
or Conventional 

By Madge Dressen 




Evans 




YOU may say "Yes, it's beautiful. It's touching. 
But what has it to do with Ben Lyon on the moot 
subject of Companionate Marriage?" 

It has a great deal to do with it. "As a twig 
is bent, so is the tree inclined" means, translated, as a 
young man is reared so, in later life, will he think and act. 

Ben Lyon, need I say, after quoting his mother's poem, 
was reared in an atmosphere of 
home and family love. He is the 
baby of the family. Before his 
birth, knowing that he would be 
her last child, his mother prayed 
to God daily for a son. For a 
son who would be distinguished 
and world-famous. A son to 
whom she could point with shining 
pride. She loved the stage and had 
once dreamed of such a career for 
herself. In those days "nice girls" 
didn't go on the stage. She had to 
abandon her- own dreams. She 
dreamed them again for her baby. 

And the dream came true. 

When her baby was born, his 
mother watched over each develop- 
ing thought. She entered into all 
his little-boy and young-manhood 
plans, enthusiasms and despairs. 
She guided and counseled, and 
when the stage did actually make 
its early and predestined appeal, it 
was his mother who read his lines 
over with him well into the mid- 
night-oily hours. It was his mother 
who coached him and planned bits 
of business and imbued him with 
the loving confidence that has made 



him today the head- 
liner he is. 

This happy home 
life has had its last- 
ing effect on Ben 
Lyon. His mother 
and father were 



>■■>*-' 




Across the page is 
Ben Lyon's 
mother ; and next 
to this is how, ac- 
cording to her 
poem, he seems to 
her. Close to the 
poem is Ben in his 
bearded days 



ALWAYS BABY MINE 

My baby now is six feet tall, 
But he's my baby after all. 
He cuddles me upon his knee 
nd whispers words of love to me. 

Oh, I'm as happy as can be, 

Baby Mine. 

CHORUS . . . 
Each week I'd bring him a new toy. 
And watch him clap his hands for joy. 
Now he brings me flowers and pearls, 
Just the same as other girls. 
Oh, I'm as happy as can be, 
Baby Mine. 

CHORUS . . . 
He has grown strong, but as for me, 
As years go on, more helpless be. 
He helps me walk, at home and out, 
Instead of carting him about. 
A man full grown, to man's estate, 
But always, Baby Mine. 

CHORUS 
Baby Mine, Baby Mine, 
You're my baby always, Baby Mine. 
I'm as happy as can be, 
Proud that God gave you to me 
You'll always be my baby, 
Baby Mine. 

(By Aileen Lyon, Ben's Mother) 



Mother and Dad. His sisters were 
dear to him. His home was a 
sanctuary where stained things did 
not enter. Why should they enter 
now? 

Ben's Wild Oats 

Den has sowed wild oats. What 
young man has not? The oat- 
less fields usually belong to the 
hypocrites. Ben is not a hypocrite. 
He has looked on mud as well as 
stars and doesn't hesitate to say so 
if the occasion calls for plain 
dealing. 

But deep in his heart is the little 
boy who lived at home with his hap- 
pily married mother and father, his 
sisters, his own room, his friends, 
his studies. The sound family life 
that keeps a man steady even while 
he plays with new ideas and various 
hearts and hopes. 

This background is the reason 

for Ben's not believing in Judge 

Lindsey's Companionate Marriage. 

Marriage, for Ben, is marriage — or 

(Continued on page 95) 



33 




- '?s: 





OLGA BACLANOVA it was in the begin- 
ning. After her second picture they 
changed it to Baclanova. That makes 
her an artiste in Hollywood. Things are 
as simple as that. 

That makes her an artiste in Hollywood, so 
now it's unanimous. In New York they split 
their gloves applauding "Carmencita and the 
Soldier." In the Russias, when she 
played "Pericola," it nearly caused a 
riot. Not that riots are unusual, but 
Baclanova's performance was. / 

In Moscow when she plays "Lesi- 
trata," the Greek lady who was among 
the first of the classical suffragettes, 
they rock the theater with huzzas. In 
Petrograd — that was St. Petersburg 
when the Little Father ruled — her 
"Fountain of Bachchisaray" makes 
them weep and tear their long Russian 
hair. 

I mean, it's an art. 

Is it an art? Or is it technique? 
Technique that is taught by Vladimir 
Nyemirovich-Dantchenko, founder 
with Stanislavsky of the Russian Art 




Not Gloria Swanson, at the right, but Bac- 
lanova, as a Peruvian dancing girl. And 
again, above, as herself 




Hommel 



u r 



of the 



Baclanova Mounts Her 



By Dorothy Spensley 



Theatre. Baclanova is his protegee, darling of the 
Russian little theater movement, great artist of the 
school of realism. They're always cabling her to 
come home. 

"Baclanova, is it foreign technique? What is it 
that makes your acting so different, so superb? 
How can you steal scene after scene from another 
great artist like Emil Jannings?" 

Jannings Is Willing 

That is just what she does in "The Street of 
A Sin." Jannings, apparently, is not afraid. He 
must rather like it, for Baclanova is to be his lead- 
ing lady in "Sins of the Fathers." If that isn't 
fearlessness, what is? 

Baclanova's throat was pale against the white- 
ness of her high-standing fur collar, arched up- 
ward. Her pearled teeth appeared be- 
tween reddened lips. 

But her secretary answered : 

"No ! It is not art or technique. It 
is individuality. Baclanova's individu- 
ality." 

Baclanova, the individual. 

"In America it iss reverse from Rus- 
sia." Baclanova, herself, was speaking. 
"In America first it iss the background 
of the play they sink of. The settings. 
Then it iss the costume they sink of. 
And last of all it iss the character. 

"In the Moscow Art Theatre it iss 
here where it starts. Here iss first — " 
Her hands touched her solar plexus, the 
seat of life, the center of emotion. Ana- 
tomically speaking, her tummy. "First 
the character, in Russian acting ; then 
the costume, and last the background." 

She moves with feline grace. Her 
legs are those of a dancer. Her eyes are 
those of a mystic. Blue-grey and large, 
slanting upward slightly at the outer tips 
like the Oriental. Born in Moscow of 
Baclanova, a father who was a sculptor, 
painter, violinist and director of a fac- 
tory. Of a mother who was a singer. 



34 



Lady 
Steppes 



Own Golden Stairs 



The Emotional Stairs) 

"The steps of emotion. Each one I tread on 

*■ when I have dramatic scene. One — two — 
three — four — until I reach very top step. Zat 
iss way to give true performance. Nozing 
false. Never missing a step— see — to reach 
the top. Never hurrying." 

Six brothers and sisters, and blonde. Short 
curling flaxen hair. One sister in Riga, an- 
other in Serbia, a brother lost in a war, an- 
other brother, fifteen, living at home with 
little mother. All non-professionals. Father 
dead. 

"See? Now in 'Street of Sin' I was, 
poor stupid woman. I did not sink 
queeckly. I come in and see what has 
happen and I do not oonderstand right , 
away. Then I oonderstand and slowly 
I go up my steps of emotion. You 
see?" 

Eyes of a saint and a sinner, at 
will; smile of a charmer, a domi- 
nant darling, admittedly tempera- 
mental, a tremendous personality, 
reveling in the joys of life. Bac- 
lanova. 

"Eef I was playing flapper 
woman, I would act like flapper 
woman. I would come in room 
like flapper woman. I would sit 
down like flapper woman. I would 
use my body like flapper woman." 

Slim, sturdy, strong, her body — 
with a strange resiliency, like finely 
tempered steel, Baclanova must be 
in her waning twenties. 

"When I was sixteen, I wanted to 
go on stage. Now you must know in 
Russia it was not thought good for 
girls to go on stage. But my father 
he sympathize. And my mother. He 
always want to do same sing himself only 
he had not time with violin, paint-brush 
and factory. My mother always want to 
act too. My sister say, 'Oh, Olga, you 
will not use the name Baclanova, will 
you? Your sisters and brothers would 





Both are Baclanova; she is 

as much at ease against a 

background of squalor as 

against one of splendor 



be so ashame.' After while, when I 
succeed, they are all very happy to have 
same name. So I go, with four hun- 
dred others, to Dantchenko at the Mos- 
cow Art Theatre and take test." 
. The Theatre was formed in 1898 by 
exponents of the new school of dra- 
matic realism. It was there that Gor- 
don Craig, the son of Ellen Terry and 
lover of Isadora Duncan ; Leon Bakst, 
Meyerhold and other artists gathered. 

A Family of Fifty 

"LJe asks you to read somesing, and 
you do, and then he asks you to re- 
cite a poem. Four people were chosen. I 
was one. Then I work hard. I get twenty- 
five rubles a month. That is about twelve 
dollars in your money. Rehearse and re- 
hearse. We are like large family, all the 
actors and Dantchenko and his aides. Maybe 
fifty or sixty of us, divided in two sections. 
One the old school, who were with him when 
(Continued on page 119) 

35 





Gossip of the 



Above is Ramon 
Novarro as "A Certain 
Young Man" — certain, 
naturally, of whom he 
likes, for the girl is 
Marceline Day 



u 



A REMINISCENCE of Aimee Semple Mc- 
Pherson's visit to New York's haunts of 
sin last year. In a notorious Broadway 
dive a very tough specimen of cabaret performer 
was pulling" his stuff while Aimee, in a front 
seat, listened. He sang a highly improper little 
ditty of the old maid who invited a man to her 
room and pulled down the window shades. "Per- 
haps" — he ended, jigging violently, "she was 
putting on her wraps — perhaps." He leered him- 
self off the stage. Everyone looked at Aimee, who 
issued her verdict. 

"A hungry heart," she said, earnestly, "seeking 
salvation." 

He Sure Was a Card 

AND he was a Hollywood wisecracker. He had, he 
announced, a strong sense of humor. This sally 
being greeted with a shout of laughter, he went on. "I told 
my landlady," said he, "that if she didn't quit asking 
me for the rent, I'd just leave her and build in Bev- 
erly Hills. The bank called up," he added, "and told 
me that if I didn't take that two dollars out of there, 
they were going to charge me storage," He was a 
Hollywood wisecracker. 



Are Shepherds Sheepeople? 
/ T l HESE English actors — there was Ralph Forbes on location with a 
desert picture in Arizona and referring to the cowboys who flocked to 
watch them as "those— those, ah — cow persons." According to this, we 
suppose all who run chicken ranches should be known as hen-folk ; and as 
for shepherds, they are just sheepeople. 





C. S. Bull 



Smiling and composed despite the racket 

right behind her ear, Anita Page, who was 

first shot into prominence through the 

interest of Harry Thaw 



Marion Douglas's head has been turned. 

But not by success — even so definite a 

success as being Tim McCoy's leading 

woman 

C. S. Bull 




36 




'OCUS 1 



Stars and Studios 



N< 



Doodness Dracious, Dolores! 

OW it's the talkies. Dolores Costello pursued 
by the villain about a table, lisping, "Merthy! 
Merthy ! Perhapth you have a thister of your 
own." In a newsreel picture, the other day, I 
saw (and heard) the Irish patriot, De Valera, 
shouting - that Ireland would some day throw off 
the crushing- burden of English home rule and be 
free. The shot was taken in a lovely English 
garden whose owner apparently had not realized 
what purpose it had been borrowed for ; as the 
patriot grew louder in his defiance to the British 
lion, a well-bred English voice came unexpectedly 
from the background of the picture : "What an 
impossible person ! I cahn't allow this, reahly. 
Get owt of my gahden ! Get OAvt of my gahden !" 

Hammer-Proof 
TN a recent magazine article directed against a pop- 
ular man-star, Karl Dane was spoken of as "a 
moron carpenter." Hollywood sat back awaiting 
results, expecting to hear that the giant Swede had 
taken the writer of the article apart, but nothing hap- 
pened. "Oh, Karl was pleased with what they called 
him," a studio publicity man explained, "took it as 
a compliment. He thought he was being called a 
Mormon and being kidded about his success with 
the ladies !" 

The Humble Hart 

"QILL HART was the speaker recently at the ceremony at Newhall, where 

a gold medal was to be presented to a little boy who had pulled his 

sister and brother to safety in the recent flood. Bill rose and told them of 




For gll that parting is such 
sweet sorrow and that he's 
playing in "The Good-Bye 
Kiss," Matt Kemp shouldn't 
look so blue. "When a girl 
like Sally Eilers nestles up 
to you — proverbs or no 
proverbs — the only possible 
emotion is whoopee ! 





P. S. Cleveland 



Reynolds is no suitable last name for a 
girl with a figure like the one above and a 
first name like Vera. The one fitting sur- 
name is Niceindeed 

Among the many ideas that the movies 
have set aside is the old astronomical 
theory that stars arise in the West. Mary 
Ashly and Jane Laurel 1 — at the left — are 
from the South 

37 







Lansing Brown 

Anyone who doubts that stars in the dark are best ap- 
proached warily has only to look at this glimpse of Lina 
Basquette and George Duryea as they appear in "The 
Godless Girl" 




A pair of pears and a peach — the pears being alligator, or 
avocados ; and the peach being Ruth Taylor 



Looks like a plain case of love at first sight between Sue 

Carol and Arthur Lake. But it may be just for a scene in 

their forthcoming picture, "The Air Circus" 



All the Gossip of 

an early memory of his. His father had taken his sister and 
himself to the top of a mountain to hury there a tiny baby 
brother. With his own hands he dug" the small grave, but 
then he turned to Bill's little sister and told her to kneel by 
the grave and say a prayer. "My father told me afterward," 
related Bill, "that he had done that because he didn't feel 
that he was good enough to say the burial prayer for a 
child. And, folks," added Bill, with tears in his eyes,, "that's 
the way I feel now. / don't feel good enough to give this 
medal to this child!" 

Among Those President 

"\A7HAT a town Hollywood is ! There is the actor, for 
instance, who stalks about the streets made up in the 
character of Abraham Lincoln, which he once played in a 
picture. "He won't be satisfied," someone said the other 
day, "till he's assassinated/' 

Lupe Velez Reforms 

TUPE VELEZ is good for an entire evening's continuous 
performance at any time. In addition to dancing like a 
she-dervish and singing naughty little songs, Lupe is a 
marvelous story-teller. Here is one, "Meestar Schenck he 
call me in at hees office an he say, 'Lupe, ev'ybody lofe you 
at thas studio, but they don' lik' you should say all them 
bad swear words. Eef you want grow up to be beeg star 
you gotta stop saying them bad swear words. Now, Lupe, 
I wan' you put up your right han' and promise me, "Meestar 
Schenck I won't never say them bad swear words no 
more." So I put op my hand an' I say eet. And then the 
ver' nex' day I was driving inside the studio and anozzer 
car come out fast an' I lean out and shout to the driver, 
'Whas a matter, you dam' ol' fool? Mebbe you los' your 
dam' arm in the war, hey?' An' the driver lean out an' say, 
'Oh, Lupe!' an' I look at heem an' I say, 'Oh, Meestar 
Schenck.' " 



He's Still Stunned 



O 



LD Uncle Andrew Waldron, eighty-two-yearold protege 
of Ruth Roland, and just finished with a role in a Hoot 
Gibson film, was speaking disapprovingly of the modern 
woman. "Times have changed since I was a young man," 
said he shaking his white head, "why, will you believe it, I 



38 




the Stars and Studios 



was engaged to a young woman sixty years, ago, and I broke 
the engagement because she told a shady story. I was 
stunned." 

He looked admonishingly about a circle of flapper lis- 
teners, but the moral effect of his tale was slightly dampened 
when they cried enthusiastically in chorus, "Oh, Uncle 
Andrew, what was the story?" 

Cocktails Out of School 

A CERTAIN handsome leading man in Hollywood some- 
"^ times takes — hush ! — one drink too many. At the 
studio they tell me that when he is to be called back to 
make a scene over, they don't tell him he is needed for re- 
takes. But for reshakes. 

Multiple Thrift 

''"LTAS she kept her youthful figure?" the old friend asked. 
The other moving picture lady sniffed, "Kept it!" she 
exclaimed. "She's doubled it!" 

Signs of the Clime 

<<r PHE way you know that you've gone Hollywood," says 
Harlem Thompson, a New York writer," "is that you 
Avouldn't be surprised if you went out to get your mail some 
morning and found a green elephant on the front lawn and 
a pink rain falling." 



About the End of France 



O 



N location with "The Divine Lady" company this 
supreme example of tactlessness occurred. Surrounded 
by directors, scenario writers, and movie stars in the uni- 
forms of Lord Nelson's midshipmen, a fan magazine writer 
asked, "What was the Battle of Trafalgar about, anyway?" 
Victor Varconi, as Nelson, stared helplessly at Frank Lloyd, 
the director. Scenario writers and technical advisers un- 
ostentatiously slipped away from the group. Someone 
feebly tried to change the conversation, but the writer per- 
sisted, "But really, what was the Battle of Trafalgar about?" 
They looked at her with hatred in their eyes, and walked 
away and left her all alone. 

{Continued on page 100) 





R. H. Louise 
Spotted — and for a certain winner. Betty Morrissey should 
steal so many pictures they'll have to change her last name 
to Larceny 




C. S. Bull 
Brim-full of beauty: the largest hat grown this year in 
California swells, in its pride, a few sizes larger for being 
worn by both Dorothy Sebastian and Anita Page 



Mighty shipshape little models, both of them, we'd say. And 
especially the one on the right. Her name is Alice White 



39 




our 



Hollywood may have its enticements, but they 
can never prevail against the charms of his 
own home in Kanawha Street, Charleston. 
He continues to regard Carry Me Back to 
West Virginny as his favorite national anthem 



Your Neighbor Next? 



This is the first of a series of articles based upon talks with 
visitors to Hollywood. There will be more — gathered from 
folks from every part of the country. What did they expect 
Hollywood to be like? And what was it like actually? Were 
they disappointed? Were they pleasantly surprised? Are the 
screen stars as beautiful face-to-face as they seem in pictures? 
Is life in Hollywood one long orgy — or pitifully tame? 

These are some of the questions that will be asked of outsiders 
inside Hollywood. And their answers will be printed as given. 
Besides other comment the folks from home may wish to make. 

Someone from your part of the country is there now. He — or 
she — may be the next to be interviewed. Or maybe you're going 
to be, yourself — and you will be. 

Watch for this feature every month. It's the sure way to get the 
inside story of Hollywood from people you know are telling it 
straight. Next month's Neighbor may be yours. Get ready to 
see what he says. — Editor's Note. 



A RE all these things you hear and read about Holly- 

/ \ wood really true? Do the picture people behave 

f~ "\ as scandalously as you've been led to believe? 

Would you recognize the movie stars if you saw 

them? Is Gloria Swanson beautiful and Bull Montana 

as homely as he looks on the screen ? 

There is someone in Hollywood who can answer all 
your questions. He is from your home town. Would 
you like to hear all about the stars from one who has seen 
them? I thought so! Gather 'round, folks. 

I found a man from Charleston, West Virginia, who 
is known to everyone in the state — Mr. N. R. Dawley. 
He's the young fellow who lives at 1301 Kanawha 
Street ; who plays golf and dances at the Kanawha Coun- 
try Club, and sings in the choir at St. John's Episcopal 
Church down at the corner of Broad and Quarrier Streets. 
He's the man who drives and sells Rolls-Royce automo- 
biles in all the territory around Charleston, the capital of 
West Virginia. He is a regular chap — a prince of a fel- 
low, and I know he'll tell you a lot of things about Holly- 
wood that will surprise you ! 

Just for the moment, let's say we are all in the Roose- 
velt Hotel, on Hollywood Boulevard— shall we go over 
in the far corner of the rotunda and listen to the boy from 
down South ? Pull up that easy chair. Here goes ! 

40 



N. R. Dawley 

West Virginia 

His Reactions to — 

His Actions in — 

By Walter Ramsey 



"It's really funny! You know, I didn't actually start 
out to come to Hollywood — I was headed for Wilmington 
to catch a boat for Havana. Hollywood just happens to 
be one of the places I was going through to get to it. 
Well, I only got half through ! We were in an automobile, 
going pretty fast down Hollywood Boulevard, when I 
happened to glance up, and I immediately said : 'Whoa, 
brotha', stop — this is the place — travel is no longa' neces- 
sary at all! You have come to the end of the search.' I 
got out, and I'm still out, and I may stay out for a little 
while. You know, something new comin' up every day — 
and I just can't help feelin' that if Ah left, Ah'd be 
missin' somethin'. 

"Funny thing ! The folks back home have some 
awfully peculiar ideas about this town. They used to 
say nobody drinks water out there, they just drink gin — 
that's about all — everybody's messin' 'round generally, 
and it's open season on husbands at all times ! (They 
had some other stories, too, but I don't guess I'd better 
repeat those!) 

Scandal Is Scant 

"YY7ell, I don't know! I came out here; I've been 
vv circulatin' 'round and making out like I wasn't 
dumb ; I've seen a lot of people and been plenty of places 
— and I don't know, seems like maybe we were all wrong. 
I couldn't find any more real scandal in Hollywood than 
I've found in lots of places in this country and on the 
other side. 

"You know, I still get the Charleston Gazette by mail 
every day, and there's always something about a shootin' 
or a general riot in Hollywood — some movie star raisin' 
hell, etc. Honestly, you would laugh if you could read 
the Hollywood newspaper report of the same story. It 
never is a star, or even a near-star, but always some punk 
kid, workin' as an 'extra' for $5.00 a day — who has 
gone haywire. Every bit of scandal about Hollywood, 
that I've traced down, I've always found to be about 
nine-tenths bunk— and the rest space-fillah. 

"Sometimes, you know, I just sit and wonder where 
all these ideas about Hollywood and picture stars origi- 




eighbor 



Residents of Charleston 
rehearsing the reception 
ceremony they will hold 
outside the State Capitol 
for Mr. Dawley when he 
returns 



of Charleston, 
Relates All 
and Some of 
Hollywood 




nate — 'cause they are an awfully pleasant, democratic 
crowd, fully as nice as any of the people I've met in 
Charleston, or anywhere else! I spent a most enjoyable 
afternoon last Sunday out at the beautiful home of James 
Cruze and Betty Compson. They entertain with open 
house on Sundays, and all their friends certainly take 
advantage of it. Such food ! Such real people ! Every- 
one was friendly and so interesting. In the evening, I 
went to the home of Victor Halperin, the producer, and 
his wife. Just a typical Hollywood evening at their place 
— music and entertainment by the guests (the hospitality 
reminds me of 'open houses' down through the South — 
particularly at the home of Harry Slush, down at Whites- 
ville, near Charleston) ; and what do you all think we had 
to drink? Grape-fruit punch!!! And we used to call it 
Alcohol-ywood ! Hollywood showed me its true colors 
last Christmas. It's surely hard to be away from home 
any time, much less at Christmas. The most wonderful 
hospitality was shown to a few boys who were unfortu- 
nate enough to be without a 'home and family.' A gor- 
geous Christmas dinner, given by Finis Fox and his wife, 
Loris, for Harry Wilson, Roland Drew, Bob Curlee, Lew 
Jerome and myself. Just boys away from home ! There 
were three girls, all up and coming young 'baby stars,' 
Molly O'Day, Isabel O'Neil and Lola Hoteling, to serve 
us. What a dinner! There was a 'tree' with presents for 
each one — I mean to say I won't forget that Christmas as 
long as I live. 



As Democratic as a Brown 
Derby 

ll \^ov'r> naturally think that 
a movie star, makin' close 
onto $5,000 a week, wouldn't 
walk across the street to say 
'howdy' to the Prince of 
Wales — but, wrong again. I 
saw such ones as Claire Wind- 
sor, Charlie Chaplin, Lois 
Wilson, Norman Kerry and 
Tommy Meighan push their 
way down through an angry 
mob on a dusty flying field — 
just to say 'greetings' and 



Hot-Spots in Mr. Dawley's Comments: 

Movie acting is a great life, if you've got strong 
suspenders. 

Christmas dinner at Finis Fox's — and three 
baby stars to serve us: Molly O'Day, Isabel 
O'Neil and Lola Hoteling. 

Don't come to Hollywood expecting to find 
gold in the hills — 'cause it's all gone. 

A typical Hollywood evening — and what do 
you think we had to drink? Grape-fruit punch! 

There is no happy medium in this town — you 
are either in or out. 



shake hands with Lindbergh ; and I mean it was no easy 
job to get to him. But, of course, don't let me tell you 
all anything that will spoil your illusions. I know that a 
lot of folks think all these people are high-hat and hard 
to get along with — and they want to think that — so don't 
pay any attention to my ravin' ! 

"Back home, they think making pictures is a soft snap ! 
I may have seen tougher jobs, but I can't remember 
where (I know Charleston hasn't any). All kinds of 
weather ; all hours of the day and night ; in all kinds of 
places — that's a movie star's day. I really saw them 
make a picture, and if you think I'd trade places with the 
star (even for $5,000 a week), you're crazy! I wouldn't 
take it on a bet — I like my comfort. I don't like 'rain' 
from fire-hoses, nor 'wind' from airplane motors, nor 
sand-storms, nor fallin' off buildings, nor any of that silly 
stuff that they have to go through every day — and I don't 
mean pay your own insurance! And I want to tell you 
that I've seen plenty of occasions when your favorite 
movie queen has had to turn down or cancel a wonderful 
social engagement just to go out in the middle of the 
night and be rescued from a 'raging torrent' by the hero 
— 's a great life, if you've got strong suspenders ! 

Tough on Honest Chiselers 

"Hon't come to Hollywood expecting to find gold in the 
hills, either — 'cause it's all gone. If you haven't got 
a pile of ready cash, or a good 
connection, leave Hollywood 
off your route. This is cash- 
and-carry paradise. It's no 
place to come expectin' to four- 
flush — the woods are so full of 
promoters and fourflushers 
now that it's hard for an hon- 
est chiseler like myself to getby. 

"If you ever come to Hol- 
lywood, look me up. I'll in- 
troduce you to some people 
and take you to some parties 
(and fill you up with some of 
our famous 'grape-fruit 
punch') and cabarets that will 

{Continued on page 87) 



41 



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EDITOR'S NOTE: In the 
May issue of Motion Pic- 
ture, Buster Collier re- 
marked: "Find Me the Girl and 
I'll Marry Her" and started the biggest postage 
stamp boom the country has ever seen. Nobody had to 
go out and do any discovering for him: the girls found 
themselves and notified Buster immediately. This 
story concerns his experiment and the experience it 
brought. It tells of how he learned about women from 

them 



IT is one thing to advertise for a used car, 
a vacuum cleaner or a place in the coun- 
try, and quite another to advertise for 
a wife. 

In an expansive moment, William Collier, 
Jr., inserted a small want ad in a recent issue 
of Motion Picture Magazine listing the desir- 
able qualities and general specifications of the girl 
he'd like to marry. 

Ever since the item appeared, Buster — as he is 
universally called — has been showered with notes, 
inundated with letters, overwhelmed . with tele- 
grams and almost driven mad by telephone calls, 
from those who are sure that they have found the 
girl for him, that they can find her, or that they 
are the girl themselves. 

"I am just the girl you want. I have blonde 
hair and brown eyes and am very fond of boats 
and machinery. I am past nineteen. If this 
answers your wishes, please respond." 

"I'm not the Queen of Sheba. I don't dress 
fine. But I'm the kind of mama that's home all 
the time." 



Buster Collier Will Say It's 

Active. His "Girl Wanted" 

Ad Has Crippled the 

Hollywood Postoffice 

By Ruth Tildesley 



"I am answering your adv. If I will 
suit, I beg you to say so in Motion 
Picture. I'm a blonde, eighteen years 
old. I love boats, although I have never 
been in one. I guess I know all about 
you because I read it in Motion Picture 
so I know I love you now. I never 
met a moody creature yet." 

Buster's adv. mentioned a blonde 
with brown eyes, non-professional, A. 
No. 1 hostess, must like boats. 

"I have brown eyes and like 

boats, but I'm sorry I'm not a 

blonde," apologizes an earnest 

little girl from Ohio ; while a 

(Continued on page 98) 



At the left, a cluster of girls who 
would be Mrs. Buster, together 
with their nominating speeches; and 
below, Buster himself answering 
telephone call No. 76544 



42 




The Boston- tease party: the Boston being the trick terrier, Mencken, and the tease being 

Betty Compson. She is to continue her renewal of active performance, resumed with 

"The Big City," by appearing with Milton Sills in "The Barker" 



Lansing Brown 



i 




oily wood's 



Celluloid Society 
Is Closely Organized 
and Frowns Upon 
Sin and Gin 

By Cedric Belfrage 



The Marion Davies set goes in for just the jolliest pranks 



FROM the seven deadly sins to the seven deadly 
cliques — such has been the progress of Hollywood 
society from the first hectic days of the movies to the 
present time. 
"Movie Star, Gin-Crazed, Shoots 3" was the sort of 
thing we used to have served to us with our morning 
coffee and rolls a few years ago. We drew an exciting 
mental picture of Hollywood as a mansion-lined street 
with Paramount studio at one end and Goldwyn at the 
other, where one dodged a hail of flying gin bottles as one 
walked, and where the night air was made hideous with 
the cries of intoxicated extra girls and pistol shots. 
Them was the days ! 

The year 1928 finds gin bottles discreetly hidden at the 
bottom of garbage cans, girls doing their screaming out 
of earshot in the midst of large Beverly estates, and pis- 
tols being used — er — more judiciously. The seven deadly 
cliques that make up motion picture society have formed 
a barrier of respectability behind which the casual ob- 




server would never dream any sinning could go on. What 
is more, in some cases the casual observer is correct in 
his impression. The art of good, healthy sinning is dying 
on its feet in Hollywood. You might compare the place 
to the Garden of Eden, where Adam and Eve rang the 
welkin with joyous abandon until the moment they dis- 
covered they were naked. Hollywood discovered how 
horribly naked it was when scandal after scandal blared 
forth on the front pages of the world's newspapers. It 
covered itself with the fig-leaves of the Academy of Mo- 
tion Picture Arts and Sciences, Will Hays and the seven 
deadly cliques that are movie society. Since then sinning 
in Hollywood has become a debased and under-cover thing 
which everybody is ashamed of. ^ « 

Boyds of Passage 

HThe stars came to Hollywood naked and 

A unashamed. They had never heard anyone 

pronounce bird any other way that boyd, and 



The Conrad Nagel Association The Bored Bachelors and Florence Vidor 

44 




The British Colony 







even 



fjeadly 



Cliques 



they said it just like that when referring to their female 
acquaintances. They wallowed by day in the making of their 
primitive movie melodramas and slap-sticks ; by night in 
their equally primitive, but spontaneous, forms of amuse- 
ment. Then they started going to Europe. Fairbanks 
was entertained by English peers of the realm and royal 
blood was annexed in the matrimonial market. It was 
time for the movie colony to adopt an English accent, a 
Parisian pose — and go society. 

Various degrees of respectability are represented by the 
seven main cliques into which Hollywood society divided 
itself. In some cases it is even genuine respectability. 

The largest (if the hangers-on to its fringe are in- 
cluded), the most exclusive (in point of those actually 
on the inside), and the most aspired to is the Marion 
Davies clique. With her numerous estates and unlimited 
wealth, Marion can do things on a bigger scale than any- 
body — and she does. There is probably not an actor or 
actress in Hollywood who would not give a month's salary 
for an invitation to stay at the enormous ranch near San 
Francisco, where Marion is said to entertain her friends 
on a scale unequalled since the gay days of the Roman 
Empire. The inner circle of the Davies clique consists 
of Charlie Chaplin, Harry Crocker (Chaplin's lieutenant), 
George K. Arthur, Harry D'Arrast, the director; Wil- 
liam Haines and Seena Owen. Those who are in and 
out, often figuring on the Davies invitation list but never 
becoming quite one of the gang, include Gloria Swanson, 
-v Frances Marion and Agnes Christine Johnston 

^l (scenario writers), Sam Gold wyn, Lloyd Pan- 

' tages, Louise Brooks, Bebe Daniels, Elinor Glyn, 




• 



Dorothy Mackaill and 
Adolphe Menjou. 

The Davies clique, in so 
far as its superficial ac- 
tivities are concerned, 
stands for nice, clean, 
wholesome fun. The boys 
and girls belonging to it 
get together and while 
away the long evenings 
with a pleasant game of 
charades or a screamingly 
funny kissing game in 
which the innocent victim 
waiting blindfolded for an 

osculation gets instead a plateful of ice-cream on the 
beezer. Any amount of healthy enjoyment is obtained 
from this sort of thing, which may take place either at 
one of the numerous Davies houses, or at the ranch, or 
on the yacht, or in Marion's studio bungalow. 

The Respectability Ring 

HThe most respectable clique of all is made up of Conrad 
*■ Nagel, Lois Wilson, May McAvoy, Fred Niblo and 
Enid Bennett, Antonio Moreno, and Sidney Franklin. 
This little party stands for religion, convention and all 
that sort of thing. Most of its members are Christian 
Scientists. A party where any or all of these are to be 
present is hall-marked strictly formal, and only nice people 
will be invited. Best manners must be brought along — and 
(Continued on page 84) 




The Harold Lloyd League 



The Young American Group 



The Kiddy Klique 



45 



Unless you look closely at the 
Pierrot in black silk panta- 
loons, you might well ask, 
with Milt Gross: "Is dis a 
sister?" However, it is. In 
fact, they both are. Pierrot 
is Marceline Day and Pier- 
rette, in the ballet skirt, is her 
sister Alice 




wo Days' 



46 



f 



The talkies need hold no ter- 
rors for such screen players 
as Alice and Marceline 
Day. For they can dance, 
and even without recourse to 
speech can express them- 
selves most eloquently in that 
most difficult medium of 
any — a conventional pan- 
tomime 




The First One Being 

Alice and the 

Other Marceline 






47 




Russell Ball 



the yirk jingel 

Is zith a zither that Dolores Costello, looking so soulful and seraphic, is operating? Or 

is it an early form of ukulele- — you know, the real pre-Flood article? At any rate, she 

plays it in "Noah's Ark." And if this picture's an indication of how she'll look on 

the screen, she'll undoubtedly have all who see her strumming and going 



48 



m Second Christ 

Weighs Hollywood 



Krishnamurti Calls the Screen 
a Muddied Pool of Truth 

By Gladys Hall 



IF Christ should come to Hollywood, what would He say? 
Would He say, "Father, forgive them, they know not what 
thev do." p 

Or, to these men with the power of everlasting vision in 
their hands, might He say, "Go, and sin no more." 

Clothed in other language, differently said, this, the divinely 
compassionate content of those words of Christ, is the content of 
what Krishnamurti said to me. 

Jiddu Krishnamurti is come to Hollywood. Krishnamurti, the 
young Hindu, who was announced to the world as "The Second 
Christ." 

He may be the Second Christ— or he may not be. Who can tell: 
Who is to say ? He may or he may not be the reincarnated World 
Teacher, the divine essence that has incarnated before in Buddha and 
in Mohammed. 

Of himself he says, "Please — I have no name, I do not believe in 
names and labels. I have attained to life. I am one with the Beloved. 
I have gone outside the cage." 

So had those Others. 

He may or he may not be — but whatever he is, whoever he is, he is 
not as you and I. On that sensitive, pale face which had been purged 
of all ordinary hungers, all ordinary desires, all personal ambitions 
there is a Something not to be named by you and me. Whatever the 
label may be, it is the beautiful opposite of the flesh-hungers, the 
money-greeds, the sordid, little seekings of the poor rest of us. 

He has attained to Life. That is the way he puts it. Through many 
lives he has attained to freedom from all desire. He has broken the 
chains of limitations.- He has broken the bars of pain. We are all, he 
says, like little rivers seeking our way to the infinite sea, desiring to be 
one with it. We are all like little fish caught in an evil net of transient 
things. He has escaped the net. Through the many lives he has lived, 
through many experiences, through pain and defeat and loss and self- 
denials he has attained to life. 

Eyes That Shame You 

1— Ie is slender and of the color of old ivory. His hair is shining and 
heavy and blue-black. His eyes are extraordinarily large and they 
see — what do they see? It is the simple truth to say that when you 
look into those eyes you turn away your own. Shamed. Shamed 
for the goals you have been seeking. Shamed for the idols you have 
made. His teeth are gleaming and his narrow, slender hands hold on 
to truths that you and I have perceived but dimly — or have we ? 

He wore an ordinary suit of blue. His bare feet were sandaled 
and, with the exquisite courtesy innate with him, he apologized to me 
for this departure from our customary mode of attire. 

He came to meet me at the door of the house, unattended. So 
would have done the Carpenter of Nazareth. 

He brought chairs to the porch and said, "Let us sit 
in the open air." His voice is light and clear. Free. He 
is gentle and deprecatory rather than dictatorial. He 
( Continued on page 88) 




Ziegler-Zwolle 



49 




k ¥, 




7 

c/ oin the Movies 

and 

See the World! 



Nick Stuart ZH'd — and 
Has — and How! 

By Dorothy Manners 






BACK in the dark ages B. M. (before Movietone) 
when I myself was an actress on the Fox lot, there 
was a kid around named Nick Prata who had a 
smile the tooth-paste people should have sued him 
for. He was somewhere around in- his- late teens at the 
time, and if there's anything in that slogan, "The face 
with the smile wins," Nick was destined for big things 
from the start. He was employed in odd jobs around the 
studio. Whatever happened to come up. For a while he 
worked in the casting department and then they put him 
out on the sets as script clerk or some other run-around 
job. 

He was so doggone agreeable about everything. He 
didn't seem to care what they gave him to do as long 
as he was permitted to stick around and absorb the 
movie atmosphere. He was crazy about Tom Mix and 

50 



used to hang around his sets as much as pos- 
sible, watching the tough Westerner shoot 'em 
up and down. Now and then some director 
noticed him and said something about his good 
camera-face, but nothing ever came of it until : 
One day, when he was busy about his job 
as thirteenth assistant to Raoul Walsh on 
"What Price Glory," they sent for him over 
in the casting office to make a test. For the 
movies. "Hot dog," said Nick, or something 
like that. "What's the matter?" inquired 
Walsh, who probably noticed him for the first 
time. "They want me to take a test," yelled 
Nick. Mr. Walsh was slightly peeved. He 
seemed to think that there were enough kids 
hanging around as actors without making a 
good thirteenth assistant into one. But he let 
him go. Even if he wasn't particularly enthu- 
siastic about his movie career. "When you 
come back," he ordered from his megaphoned 
throne, "check out those extra people and tell 
them to be back at nine o'clock tomorrow." 

He Never Game Back 

D ut Nick never came back ! Somebody else 

*-* had to tell the extras to return at nine, 

for not long after that fateful test the young 

Mr. Prata became the equally young Mr. 

Stuart who was featured in "Cradle-Snatchers," 

"The News Parade" and lately "The River Pirate." 

Now, some of the thirteenth assistants are hopping 

around for Nick and watching him shoot 'em up ! It just 

goes to show something or other. You can't keep a good 

kid down, I guess is the correct sentiment. The day I 

lunched with him in the Fox cafe we reminisced about 

when I was a leading lady and he had run his legs off 

doing odd jobs on my sets. Now I was over in the 

capacity of presenting him to his public. There ought to 

be some sort of moral in that, too. He was wearing a tan 

shirt opened at the throat, a shock of naturally curly black 

hair and his famous and likable grin. The open shirt 

was put on solely for the purposes of the final shots of 

"The River Pirate," being taken that day, but the hair 

and the smile were just part of Nick's natural get-up. 

{Continued on page 116) 



It may be classified approximately, but not 
[Highly, into three kinds: undergraduate, 
w raduate and post-graduate. At the bottom, 
Richard Arlen in the mood of a young man 
about to ask Nancy Carroll to the Junior 
prom; higher and to the right, Ruth Taylor 
asking James Hall for just one itsy-bitsy 
string of pearls; and next to them, Clive 
Brook and Evelyn Brent engaged in one of 
those affairs of the heart wherein men want 
to be men, but women are mental 




ytssorted 



Richee 




ove 



51 



$OHE ^eURES^FlCTiOH 




Juliet Gives 

On Clara Bow 

Wan ts to Go 

Night 

By Elizabeth Petersen 



Romeo and Juliet Visit Clara Bow 

SCENE, The Paramount lot. 
Romeo is whanging an Italian guitar and making 
eyes at Juliet, who looks a trifle bored. Sud- 
denly he stops as Clara dashes on the stage. and 
starts necking. 
He speaks : 

"Her hair is brighter than the sun, 
How fair she is, so young, so worldly and so wise. 
Mv heart stands still before her loveliness." 



Juliet 
"In far Verona, you once sang of Juliet." 

Romeo 
"But that was long ago and men have changed. 
The world is different now." 

Juliet (aside) 
"The Prune ! 'Tis only women who have changed. 
Men will but be themselves tomorrow as they were 
yesterday." 

(Aloud) 
"This Clara that you sing of is known as Red 
Head." 

Romeo 
"Ah, no ! Not red. 'Tis Titian." 

Juliet 
"What's in a name? 
Red hair by any other name is still red hair." 

Romeo 
"It travels like a flame into my heart. She fires me. 



Jual to feel in the swim without getting wet, old man Dinsmore, 

and his little daughter Elsie, had a nice beach party with the 

Sennett girls 

52 



One look at Clara Bow, and Romeo 

broke three strings on his guitar and 

told Juliet to go pick out a nice new 

divorce for herself 



She has this thing the moderns sing of, 
This deadly, glorious thing called 'it.' ' 

Juliet 
"If you say that word again, I'll slay you!" 

Romeo 
"Her face is white like snow that's newly fallen." 

Juliet (cattily) 
"It's calcimine, my dear ; don't be a sap." 




VisiTrlHio tiVMoo d 



the L o wd own 
and Anna Moore 
to Greta Garbo's 
School 

Wood-Cuts By Eldon JCelley 



With hardly a sawmill in sight, Jack 

Dalton tells Our Nell that villains as 

is villains are as obsolete as the 

Charleston 



Romeo 
"Her coal-black lashes lay against her cheek like tired 
birds." 

Juliet 
"Now, Romeo, where's your sense of humor? 
Imagine blackbirds sleeping 'gainst your cheek !" 

Romeo 
"Methinks, forsooth, this Clara is a goddess; 
I long to draw my sword for her ..." 





Juliet 
"Perhaps 'tis true the lady is the berries. 
But swords, like corsets, now are antiquated. 
If thou wouldst win the dame, I'd fain suggest 
A Packard, or a Lincoln or a Stutz, 
Perhap a diamond bracelet or an anklet." 

Romeo (sighs) 
"Ah, me !" 

Juliet 
"These modern maidens have no need of swords. 
They've learned to know their onions. 
We only knew our roses." 



Romeo 
"I long to walk beside her in a moonlit garden, 
To tell her of my love on bended knee." 

Juliet (taking out her knitting) 
"Good night ! What mid-Victorian technique ! 
Dost thou not know that maids today demand 
The longest loving in the shortest time? 
Mongst modern sheiks 'you'd be a washout ! 
It's necking that they want . . . not words ; 
To them the moon is but a circle in the sky." 

Romeo (passionately) 
"I long to tell her how my heart has bled." 

Juliet 
"Oh, Romeo, can the chatter ! Come to bed." 

Elsie Dinsmore Tries to See Little Eva 

""T\ear Papa," said Elsie in her own sweet, simple 
way, "I've finished my daily chapter in the 
Bible and I'm all ready for our visit to the studios. 
Won't it be a lark?" 

"Dear Elsie, I wish you would not use such 
(Continued on page 86) 

53 




Uncle Jim's 

Cabin 



Here are Norma Talmadge and Gilbert Roland bound 
for Honolulu on a vacation. Norma brought her mother 
along, of course; and Norma's uncle, James Cooley, 
shared Gilbert's stateroom.. At the moment this picture 
was snapped, it is supposed that Uncle Jim was in his 

cabin 



54 



w 



hen Is A 



Story Stolen? 



This Question Has 
Caused Every Picture 
Company to Have 
More Suits Than the 
Prince of Wales 



By Dorothy Calhoun 



"4LL right, sue me!" is the 
/\ catchword with which 
/ \ members of the sce- 
nario department at 
the Lasky studio greet each 
other nowadays ! 

Plagiarism suits have become 
such an expense item on movie 
budget books that many com- 
panies send back all original 
manuscripts unopened. After 

a picture is released the producers are flooded with letters, 
typewritten on business stationery, scrawled with a pencil 
on cheap lined pad paper, penned in violet ink and scented 
with Night of Love perfume, but one and all declaring 
"You've stolen my plot !" 

Each case that is taken to court costs the studio about 
fifteen hundred dollars in lawyers' fees arid wastes several 
weeks of valuable time, though the complaining authors 
seldom win their cases. The damages asked, vary. A 
shoe clerk who has sent in a story about young love and 
has afterward seen a picture of young love on the screen 
may demand five thousand dollars, but he is usually willing 
to settle for a couple of hundred out of court. Anne 
Nichols, on the other hand, is suing Universal for three 
million, claiming that the plot for their picture, "The 
Cohens and the Kellys" was stolen from her stage play, 
"Abie's Irish Rose." It is rumored that if she wins a 
verdict she intends to sue all companies using Irish-Jewish 
themes. Metro-Goldwyn's "Kosher Kitty Kelly" may 
come next. 

"She's got a patent on the Irish and the Jews and their 
troubles," Edward Montaigne, head of Universal Scenario 
Department, smiles. "At the trial our lawyers will point 
out that 'Romeo and Juliet' was' written quite a while ago. 
They might even be able to establish that it was written 
before Abie.' And it has practically the same plot, two 
young people from rival families who fall in love. 
Shakespeare, though, has good ground for plagiarism 
suits against the best novelists and dramatists of today. 
We'r^ making a picture right now, called 'Grease Paint,' 




Freulich 
Although the studios are eager for new 
ideas, Edward J. Montaigne, above, 
editor-in-chief of Universal, 
says that the many plagiarism 
suits are destroying the market 
for amateur scenario writers. 
Left, a scene from "Abie s 
Irish Rose" 

that is simply 'Othello' up to date. But it's the treatment 
that counts. All the original plots have been used. There 
are only a limited number of possible combinations of 
characters and circumstances, anyway, and people have 
been writing stories for several thousand years." 

As scenario editor, Montaigne has handled tons of 
scripts submitted by amateur writers, each of whom 
claims to have a new idea. He is a marked man. Every- 
one who meets him wants to tell him a plot. His dentist, 
holding him helpless under the drill, relates a scenario to 
him. His little girl's piano teacher brings scripts out of 
her music bag. His cook brings in a scenario with the 
breakfast bacon. 

Sometimes, he admits, astonishing ideas are presented 
to him. There is the spiritualist lady who is in constant 
communication with Rudolph Valentino. In the spirit 
world, she writes, Rudie has met Edith Cavell, who insists 
that he must make one more picture on earth. For a con- 
sideration she will sell Valentino's services to Universal 
to write and direct a movie. Then there is the man who 
writes that he has dreams that would make wonderful 
scenarios. The latest was a dream of being transported 
to another planet where he was met by Christ and escorted 
about the place. 

"The amazing thing to me is that everyone thinks he 
can write without any training." Montaigne sighs a 
heartfelt sigh. "The studio carpenters come to me and 
say, 'Mr. Montaigne, I'm being laid off for a few weeks 
because the work's too slack and I thought I might fill in 
(Continued on page 113) 

55 



j\,idi 



ng the Crest 

Impermanent 





56 



jiolly wood's 



of 

Wave 



"V-N 



Drawings by D. G. Shore 



Four little maidens luminary, two from the Wampas 
seminary. Or, if you like, from left to right, Alice 
White, Ruth Taylor, Sue Carol and Nancy Carroll. 
All are starlets, Alice and Nancy having elected them- 
selves; and Ruth and Sue having been duly chosen as 
official (none genuine without this trade-mark) Baby 
Stars. It's a matter of speculation among some how 
long the popularity of these youngsters will endure. For 
our part, we think as long as the youngsters wish it to. 
At any rate, there's no doubt that everything in their 
lives right now is aquaplane sailing 





MM 



' ' \f^MMML-*-L. 



D.G.Pj>ore. 



57 




She has a sway with her, 
has Mary Duncan. She 
came to prominence first 
on the stage in "The 
Shanghai Gesture," but 
this view of her indicates 
that she knows more 
movements than just the 
Mongolian. "The Four 
Devils" is to mark her 
first screen appearance; 
and so far as we're con- 
cerned, as long as there 
is Mary, the other three 
may be dispensed with 



Mortensen 



By Gladys Hall 



M 




'he's the Kind of 

irl Men 

T)otit Yorget 

'igerish Mary Duncan 
[s too Enigmatic Even 
for Sophisticated 
[ollywood 



ARY 
Dun- 

c a n 
is the 
kind of wo- 
man men do 
not forget. 
If you know 
what I mean. 

And if you 
saw her in 
"The Shang- 
hai Gesture" 
on the speak- 
ing stage, you 
do know what 
I mean, and don't pretend innocence that you don't. 

Instinctively, one speaks of her as a woman, though she 
is probably in her early or mid-twenties. It doesn't mat- 
ter, her age. She seems to have the depth of a woman 
rather than the thin glamour of a girl. 

Back of her one senses a tapestry of experience and of 
emotion, exotic, tinged with absinthe green, flamingo red, 
old ivory and fingered yellow. There is the clash of 
steel on steel, dark hours, the spilling of blood and the 
shattering of glass and of hearts. Men die with twisted 
mouths and women slink along alleyways of vengeance. 
Medicis and Borgias. Dolores and Faustine. Dice thrown 
in hell. 

Mary Duncan is a slender woman — I insist upon the 
woman — of medium height and slender — a fresh skin — 
round, blue eyes — thin, painted lips — a flash of teeth — 



Mortensen Photos 



dark hair sometimes disheveled, some- 
times parted in the middle and laid down 
like a Benda lacquer. Thin, small hands. 
A woman with a husky voice. Slight 
Southern accent. Smoking cigarettes. 
Talking volubly. Calling a spade a gigan- 
tic shovel. Modern in her dress. Ultra- 
modern in her point of view. Not beau- 
tiful. Arresting. The perfect "Other 
Woman" to every wife. 

People just naturally suppose that 
Mary Duncan has stepped from an aro- 
matic past, to put it pleasantly. 

Asking the Dope on Dope 

A youth on one of the Hollywood lots felt the yen to 
■**■ sin, scarletly, with the grand gesture and then to die, 
appropriately at thirty some. He figured that dope was 
the proper first step to distintegration. He asked advice of 
Mary Duncan and was amusedly skeptical when she told 
him that she could be of no assistance. 

Men make frenzied love to her and receive the call to 
hara-kiri because they evoke a cool, detached response. 
It seems too bad that there are no Napoleons today to 
conquer such a Josephine. But perhaps she isn't a Jose- 
phine. Perhaps the exterior conceals the zealous worker 
— and perhaps it doesn't. Who knows? That Mary 
Duncan is an enigma is, after all, the key to the riddle. 
Try to use it. 

She was born and brought up in a small town some- 
(Continued on page 93) 

59 



By Elizabeth 




FORGOTTEN FACES 

A VERY happily cast picture, with the suave and graceful 
Mr. Give Brook in his element as a gentleman crook. He 
is also a passionately devoted father, a role, which is equally 
becoming. And Olga Baclanova (now known simply as 
Baclanova, just to be different) and William Powell make it 
a 'grand cast. This is really not a very deserving picture, being- 
crammed full of all the old tricks and devices known to melo- 
drama, but it's smoothly done. A life-termer at Sing Sing is 
finally pardoned, so he may save his daughter from the prey- 
ing hands of a disreputable mother. But he must first promise 
not to kill his wife. How he contrives her death and yet keeps 
his promise to the warden is the spooky and exciting climax. 




LADIES OF THE MOB 

J^N OWING nothing about crime, as I do, it seems to me 
this is the best and truest of the underworld pictures. It 
ought to be real, anyway, because the story was written by a 
convict, who probably had a colorful past to draw on. Clara 
Bow is a beautiful young yegg whose great concern in life is 
to keep her boy friend out of the electric chair in spite of his 
best efforts to get there. How she accomplishes this is the 
ingenious and touching plot. There is the usual popping of 
bullets necessary to any underworld drama, but the human 
interest story of the boy and girl is more thrilling than the 
gun battles. Clara Bow and Richard Arlen are simply great. 
This is the sort of thing Clara should do. 




THE RACKET 

yHIS is a faithful reproduction of the stage play, and proves 
again that what makes a thrilling play doesn't necessarily 
make a knockout movie. That is partly due to the casting. 
Louis Wolheim, for instance, plays the gang leader with comedy 
instead of the necessary menace. Even so, it's a pretty good 
picture. Skeets Gallagher is fine as the reporter who says 
"Horses" and other things. And Marie Prevost in a blonde 
wig gives a faithful imitation of Phyllis Haver. It's the story 
of a police captain (Thomas Meighan) who, with the whole po- 
lice department and all the political leaders against him, sets out 
to get one of Chicago's most respected crooks. A lot of" dirt 
about the inside workings of politics in Chicago is revealed. 




WHITE SHADOWS IN THE SOUTH SEAS 

A PICTURE ravishing to the eye and appealing to the heart 
has been -made in the South Seas. The theme is the de- 
structive civilization that Avhite men bring into the lives of 
the natives — destructive to happiness, and even to life. Almost 
all the actors are natives, with the exception of Monte Blue 
and Raquel Torres, who have the leading roles. Monte is ex- 
cellent as the vagabond doctor who tries to save one tribe of 
natives from the white shadows. And Raquel Torres, as the 
island girl, is so good and so sincere that I couldn't believe 
she was an actress. See this by all means. It's an absorbing 
story played against beautiful backgrounds. And it starts off 
with some pearl-diving scenes you can't afford to miss. 



60 



GOLDBECK 




THE COSSACKS 

T 1 HE first half of this picture goes to really unnecessary 
extremes to prove that the hero is a sissy. That fact having 
been established, it requires only the twinkling of an eye to con- 
vert him into the boldest and bloodiest of Cossacks. From then 
on, things go from bad to worse. Turks are slain indiscrimi- 
nately. John Gilbert and Ernest Torrence are tortured right 
before your eyes. And worst of all, a Turkish sabre is run 
straight through the beautiful diaphragm of Nils Asther, who is 
the hero of the piece so far as I am concerned, as no other man 
can hold my gaze when he is in the vicinity. This is all about 
the love affair of a Cossack maiden who prefers John Gilbert to 
Nils Asther. Renee Adoree is this lovely but misguided girl. 




THE BUTTER AND EGG MAN 

J UST as butter and egg men have been dropped from our 
•/ slang vocabularies, along comes a picture showing intimate 
glimpses of one. A timid boy comes to town with a lot" of his 
grandma's money to spend. Two phoney producers want him 
to back their show, so they get the leading lady to put the 
works on him, and as soon as he gets his wind back after the 
first kiss, he starts writing cheques. It all ends to the boy's 
satisfaction, but without many thrills for the audience. This 
should have been saved for talking pictures. Furthermore, no 
amount of comedy neckties and foolish grins can make jack 
Mulhall into an innocent boy from the country. Greta Nissen 
and Gertrude Astor are the ladies involved. 




FAZIL 

A^R. SHEEHAN must have been away when Fox concocted 
this picture. I tried conscientiously to find its good points, 
but I'm afraid there are none. If you are a Charlie Farrell 
enthusiast, you will go anyway. Yes, this is a sheik pic- 
ture, after all these years. Charlie is the very disagreeable 
Hadji Fazil, who marries a little Parisienne without revealing 
any of his family traits, and then gets her back home and treats 
her like poison. As for the girl, she can't decide whether she 
wants to stay or not. So to settle it all, they die together. 
Greta Nissen is the meek little wife. Charlie is neither fish nor 
fowl — neither a fiery sheik nor his own sweet self, and the 
titles are dreadful. 




OUR DANCING DAUGHTERS 

D ICTURES are certainly getting better. Don't miss this one, 
if you really want to be entertained. It has practically 
everything. Youth, pep, good-looking women, attractive 
clothes, and an awfully good story. The titles are funny. It's 
all very smart and modern, and Joan Crawford looks and acts 
better than she ever has. The cast also includes Dorothy 
Sebastian, Nils Asther, Eddie Nugent, Johnny Mack Brown, 
and other celebrities. And the big thrill is the small new blonde, 
Anita Page, who, in her second part, steals the picture from 
Joan Crawford and gives a performance that would be un- 
usually good even for a big star. The story is about three mod- 
ern girls, and how they get husbands and how they lose them. 



61 



Current Pictures 




THE SAWDUST PARADISE 

EVANGELISTS in the movies are like the Royal Mounted 
*-* — they always get their man. You know right at the start 
that any atheists in the cast are going to be praying in the last 
reel. They haven't a chance against our movie traditions. In 
"The Sawdust Paradise," Esther Ralston is the first to go. 
She is a very nifty young woman with no scruples, who works 
in a crooked carnival. To escape a jail sentence, she joins an 
itinerant preacher, and under the influence of the dear white- 
haired old gentleman .and the little baby who creeps into their 
tent, she realizes the error of her ways. Next thing she is 
leading all her old irreverent pals down the sawdust trail. 

In spite of the carnival atmosphere, this isn't a very colorful 
story. But Reed Howes is a good leading man. The baby will 
delight all the women in the audience with some de luxe coos 
and gurgles. And just looking at Esther Ralston will give you 
your money's worth, anyway. She grows handsomer, more 
capable, and more charming in each successive picture. 




HALF A BRIDE 

TF I had to live on a desert island, I'd leave the proverbial 
ten books behind and take Gary Cooper. With practically 
nothing to work with but a penknife, a cigarette lighter, and 
his sex appeal, this boy does wonders. Esther Ralston, as a 
spoiled darling of the rich, is the lucky girl who gets cast away 
with him. They have a trial marriage (in name only) for 
three months, and they conclude what never before has 
occurred to any movie hero — that any man would fall in love 
with any girl if they were alone on a desert island. Just as 
this interesting point is reached, it turns out to be the last reel, 
and the quickest way to end it is for them to fall back into 
each other's arms when they are returned to civilization. 
While this is highly improbable and silly, it is almost sure to 
amuse you. Especially as Gary Cooper is at his best, and 
Esther Ralston is particularly winning. Esther proves that her 
hair is naturally curly (unless it was more of that trick photog- 
raphy) and that she looks ravishing even in a gunny sack. 




THE VANISHING PIONEER 

JACK HOLT is back as king of the Paramount Westerns. 
His newest picture starts off almost as impressively as "The 
Covered Wagon," but soon diminishes into a not very exciting 
tale of prairie villainy. It has one of those complicated plots 
about politicians, which puts too much of a strain on the mind, 
considering the pleasure involved. It seems a group of pioneers 
settled in Happy Valley, a land of plenty watered by a river 
that was needed to supply drinks for a famished city some 
distance to the south. A crook, representing the innocent 
Mayor, goes to the Valley and tries to get control of the water, 
and I simply can't go on from there. It's enough to know that 
William Powell is the villain. There's a lot of turning on and 
off of water, and fighting. In the end Jack Holt gets terribly 
noble and leads his people from their happy homes, leaving the 
disputed water to do the greatest good to the greatest number, 
so that politicians might not perish from this earth. 

62 





■ 


n| 




m ■ B 





EXCESS BAGGAGE 

ZL/OW it feels to be a movie star's husband is the unhappy 
theme of this drama. It starts off with the love affair of 
a second-rate vaudeville team, with William Haines doing ex- 
tremely well in a big romantic role. Everything is fine until his 
wife gets an offer to play opposite the cinema's handsomest 
sheik, and has one of those overnight successes that turn every 
girl's head. After that things go' exactly as they so often have 
in the private lives of our best movie stars. Only there's a 
happy ending, which didn't fool me. You just know that no 
prima donna is going to give up her suite at the Ritz and move 
out to Flatbush. Nevertheless, it's one of the better pictures, 
with lots of humor and colorful atmosphere. Billy spends too 
much of his time sulking. I really think this craze for clown 
make-up has gone far enough. It may be an improvement on 
Lon Chaney. but when God gives the movies something like Mr. 
Haines, it seems like blasphemy to make him wear a disguise. 



In Review 




POWER 

DROCEEDING on the theory that what's worth doing once 
is worth doing again and again, Pathe has made another 
picture patterned after "Skyscraper," with that same rough 
tough and comical pair, William Boyd and Alan Hale. Again 
these two swing precariously on girders, and there's a title 
about their being the flower of Young American Manhood, 
which someone ought to resent. This time their dizzy, danger- 
ous profession has nothing whatever to do with the story, but is 
put in, presumably, just for the sake of imitation and a few 
gasps. William and Alan duplicate their "Skyscraper" roles. 
They are friendly enemies, rival Romeos, just two big over- 
grown boys kidding back and forth. The plot consists merely 
of the fact that they both woo the same girl, and both are 
nicely stung by her at a cost of two thousand dollars per 
capita. Alan Hale has a chance to remind us that he was once 
a hoofer and is still light on his feet in spite of excess poundage. 
A picture of extremely light banter, mildly amusing. 




THE BABY CYCLONE 

'7"' HE star of this picture is a small Pekingese. Supporting 
■* him, but rather reluctantly, are such attractive performers 
as Aileen Pringle, Lew Cody, Gwen Lee, and Robert Arm- 
strong. All either pursuing this insufferable animal, or trying 
to get rid of him. The plot is about a lady who loves her dog 
better than her husband, and another lady who loves the same 
dog better than her fiance. They all fight over him for reels 
and reels, and in the end are right back where they started. 
Everyone acts very capably, but against almost insuperable odds. 
There are a few uproarious moments buried in this mass of 
so-called comedy. Gwen Lee has a good case of hysterics in 
the middle of the street, and that helps a lot. But I didn't really 
begin to enjoy it until the entire cast started mistaking each other 
for burglars and hitting each other over the head with various 
blunt instruments. That was really funny, I give you my word. 
Those who have a strong distaste for lap-dogs may enjoy this, 
but for most people it will be a waste of time. 




THE LION AND THE MOUSE 

LT/TTH the infant industry in its present state of hysterics 
about talking pictures, any film, no matter how bad, is 
interesting if it is done with a sound device. And that is the 
only possible explanation of why people flock to "The Lion and 
the Mouse," the latest Vitaphone opus. As drama, it is very 
dull, but movie goers who want to know what the future holds 
for them had better go. Whole scenes are done with Vita- 
phone, and the presence of Lionel Barrymore in the cast makes 
them much less painful than they might otherwise have been. 
He is excellent, and almost makes you forget to sigh for the 
golden silences to which you've become accustomed. On the 
other hand, May McAvoy and Buster Collier had better enroll 
in the first class for voice culture they can find. You will 
find that you lose some of the dialogue because Vitaphone 
doesn't wait for laughs. That it's harder on the eyes than silent 
pictures. And that it makes the silent portions seem a bit flat. 







THE BARKER 

T'HIS is by far the best handling the tent-show scheme has 
"* had in pictures. It seems to have a lot of reality, though of 
course I have never traveled with a tent show. And it has 
■two of the handsomest ladies to be seen on the screen. None 
other than Dorothy Mackaill and Betty Compson. Then there 
are Milton Sills and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., as father and son, 
both endowed with enough It to keep the ladies busy making 
passes at them. The story is of Betty's revenge against her 
lover, because he has moved out of her compartment and into 
his son's. And Dorothy is the girl she hires to do the dirty 
work. Betty looks and acts as she used to when she was prob- 
ably your favorite star, and holds her own against all new- 
comers. And as for Dorothy, in her hands revenge is sweet. 
Not such a good story, except for its one situation, but a very 
intriguing picture. However, not for the children, unless you're 
letting them learn about life from the movies. 



63 





or 

and 

Formal 





Norma Shearer's striped jacket with the smart scarf has 
red and white 'as its predominating colors. A white 
pleated skirt, white felt hat, and red and white shoes are 
worn with it. Above, Norma's black and white ensemble 
for afternoon wear consists of black silk coat and skirt 
and blouse of white wool crepe hand stitched with black 
thread. The hat, shoes and purse are of black and 
white straw. And at the left, she is wearing an ideal 
white sweater costume for tennis, with a red and white 
belt and saucy colorful kerchief 



64 



Norma/ 




ear 




The ensemble note is carried out by Norma Shearer in this 
evening dress and wrap of delicate orchid taffeta. The chic 
period gown has a bodice of shimmering sequins attached in 
a diagonal manner to an uneven bouffant skirt, and the wrap 
is enhanced by the novel stitched collar. The gray silk skirt 
of Norma's chic daytime costume at the right has a wide 
girdle sash tied in front with a long bow and a blouse of 
novelty wool crepe with colorful horizontal stripes woven in 
the fabric. Black and white stitched shoes and gray felt hat 
accompany this costume 






65 







orecasting About 



Taking talkie tests: At the 
top, Anita Page, then a 
group working under Eddie 
Peabody; below this 
Madge Bellamy, Anita 
Page in two poses; and 
Al Jolson, singing 

66 



Everyone's Talking of Talkies, 

and Stars Must Have Screen 

Tests for Feet 

By HERBERT CRUIKSHANK 



Editor's Note: "Motion Picture Magazine" has right along 
devoted its pages to a relation of events in the screen world that 
have happened, and to events that were happening, so covering 
comprehensively and carefully the past and the present. In 
addition to this, now it purposes to give some attention to things 
of importance that may occur, or that arc on the brink of 
occurring — in short, to peep ahead a page or two in the history 
of the screen. Such explorations of the future will appear 
monthly and under the title of "Forecasting About." This new 
idea makes its bow with the present article. 

BELIEVE it or not — like them or not — you're going to 
get talking pictures. Make up your mind to that. 
Speakies, sound-films, talkies — whatever you want to 
call 'em — are the newest toys of the producers. And 
they are going for them with the same naive, girlish enthusiasm 
that they evidenced in taking the recent whole-hearted plunge 
into prologue. 



Their ultimate success, and its degree, is in doubt. 
Opinions differ. But the synchronization of sight and sound 
in pictures is to haVe its trial. Thus, if you wish to be the 
life of the party without speaking French, walking Spanish or 
playing a saxophone, you'd better know what it's all about. 
So paste the facts in your brown (or Al Smith type) derby. 
The mighty Western Electric Company controls three sound 
devices. Vitaphone, the first to make its public bow, is 
utilized by Warner Brothers. Movietone is the preference of 
Fox, Paramount, United Artists and Metro. Firnatone ob- 
viously derives its name from the first syllables of First 
National. 

The great difference in Vitaphone and Movietone is that 
the former makes use of discs in recording sound, while the 
latter photographs the sound waves directly upon film. Firna- 
tone uses discs, and is working with the Victor Talking 
Machine Company. 

Now the deadly rival of the Western Electric Company is 
the General Electric. The General is affiliated with the Radio 
Corporation of America, which controls Photophone. And 
Photophone will probably be used by FBO in their pictures. 

It costs Lo, the poor theater owner, from four to fifteen 
thousand bucks to install Photophone. And if he wants Vita- 
phone or Movietone, he must lay it on the line to 
the tune of from nine to twenty-four grand. 

Thus endeth the first lesson. Learn it, and you 

can begin your conversation: "Well, I was 

speakin' to Harry Warner about these here 

HA talking fillums. 



Male Sopranos Are Agitated 

The first result of the sound picture regime 
has been to send cold shivers of apprehension 
along the spines of filmdom's lady baritones and 
(Continued on page 122) 





Santa Claus 



Among Them Is Barbara Worth, Who 
Loves to Dye Easter Eggs and Wants 
to Do Something -Big -and -Worth -While 



By Nancy Pryor 



IT'S wonderful. It's 
simply marvelous. I 
mean, the way this 

new bunch of movie 
kids are believing in 
things in spite of the 
pessimisms and unex- 
cited philosophies of 
the old guard, which has 
found Fame such an 
empty cup and Glory to 
be just so much bootleg. 
Gloria Swanson is, ele- 
gantly disillusioned. She 
admits it. Norma Tal- 
madge says "Kismet." 
Even Mary Pickford's smile is 
a little tired. But these new 
ones come on, tremulous, ex- 
cited, unheeding. Angels rush- 
ing in where wise men fear to 
tread. There is little Janet 
Gaynor, who is still holding 
her breath and pinching her- 
self. There's Ruth Lee Taylor, 
who just can't believe it's true. 
There's Loretta Young, that 
enfant blase, who can't quite 
hide her palpitating heart even 
beneath a thick coating of so- 
phistication. It's wonderful. 
It's simply marvelous. 

I met Barbara Worth the 
other day. We talked for an 
hour. When I left I believed 

in Santa Claus and Will Hays and religion and every- 
thing. Even in the movies. Barbara leaves you like that. 
Sort of breathless. She believes in all those things her- 
self. Particularly in the movies. Every now and then 
she clasps her hands together almost prayer-like — she be- 
lieves in 'em so hard. 

"Oh, if I were so rich I never needed another single 
thing in my life, I would work in pictures." So there ! 
You get the idea that people who don't feel as Barbara 
does about the movies are just a bunch of old meanies. 

She wore a dark dress and an orchid hat draped with 



an orchid veil, and down- 
stairs a yellow automobile 
was waiting for her. As the 
background of the Mont- 
martre Cafe, where we were 
lunching, is red, everything 
was very sunny and colorful. 
I'm so serious about pic- 
tures. I do all I can to help 
myself along. I go to the 
movies and just absolutely 
study every move the actors 
make, hoping to improve my 
own technique. Last night I 
saw Emil Jannings and 
Lewis Stone at the preview 
of 'The Patriot,' and I 
could have just applauded 
every scene they did. 
Such timing! Such tech- 
nical perfection! And 
such art! When I'm 
away from the studio, I 
study dancing to make 
myself graceful, and 
ride horseback and swim 
to keep in condition, and 
I'm also taking French 
lessons." (Well, don't successful movie stars always 
spend their vacations where French is spoken?) 

"I want to get along so much." For the first time Bar- 
bara let a little sigh creep in. "Of course, it is a little 
hard to get started. I mean started in something really 
big and worth while. It's easy enough just to get started 
in the movies, but the hard part is to get someone to recog- 
nize your ability and trust you with a big part. I've been 
under contract to Universal almost since I first started in 
pictures, and they've been wonderful to me, giving me 
{Continued on page 85) 



67 




Richee 

Wallace Beery, above with Mrs. Beery; and Richard Arlen, with 

Jobyna Ralston — officially Mrs. Arlen — not only tell the world 

that they're married but that they're happily so 



I WAS interviewing a handsome young actor the other 
day, one of those lads who is just climbing into film 
fame, when he said to me in a confidential tone, "I 
have a wife and two little daughters, but please don't 
mention them in your story. I think it's better for the 
fans to believe I'm unmarried." 

"My gosh,' again/' I exclaimed morosely. 

"I don't understand you," said the 
budding celebrity. 

"It's just this," I told him. "Half 
the married actors in Hollywood have 
put the same request to me. 'Kindly 
hide the wife and children, like a 
good old thing.' It's becoming Holly- 
wood's favorite indoor sport." 

"But the girls prefer an unmarried 
actor," he protested earnestly, as had 
all his predecessors. "He seems more 
romantic to them, and just at present 
I've got to consider my career above 
everything else. I love my wife and 
children," he added hastily, "but I do 
want to keep them out of my pub- 
licity." 

"I don't write publicity," I replied 
somewhat snappishly. "However, we'll 
compromise. I won't say you're mar- 
ried, but hanged if I'll say you're not." 

How about it, fans? Does your 
interest in an actor fade away into dim 
nothingness when you discover that he 
is a domestic being who takes the kid- 
dies for a ride to the beach on Sun- 
day, and spanks them if they won't eat 
their nice, hot oatmeal? 



Of Actors' Marriages- 

By Carolyn Dawson 



Do you prefer the unmarried actors, no matter how 
many times they may have been un-married? If one is 
to believe current novels, it's an open season on married 
men as well as single ones. A wife and family in the 
background cannot stay the flapper when she sets out to 

get her man. But per- 
haps actors are in a 
class apart. I'm sure 
I don't know. If you 
have any firm convic- 
tions on the subject, 
submit them to the 
Editor. This burning 
question should be 
settled once and for 
all time. 

A Wife and Twelve 
Bushmans 

'he first case of an 




T 



actor hiding his 
wife and children was 
that of Francis X. 
Bushman. At the 
height of his fame 
some eleven years ago 



Dyar 



George Bancroft demon- 
strates to his wife the 
habits and mating call of 
the celebrated cackling cac- 
tus of Chihuahua 



68 







Is the Less Said the Better? 



At the left, little Faith Brook, assisted by her mother, gives her 
father, Clive, his daily lesson in Mother Goose. Above, Emil 
Jannings, whose matrimonial skies are as sunny as his wife's hair 



this dashing gentleman posed as a romantic and lone 
bachelor. Unfortunately, though Mr. Bushman had but 
one wife, the children numbered somewhere between seven 
and a dozen, and they started bobbing up in all directions. 
When the truth was out, Bushman's fame was extin- 
guished like a candle flame in a hurricane. I am con- 
vinced, though, that we movie fans of that naive period 
deserted his shrine not 
because he was mar- 
ried, but because he 
had denied it. He 
had broken faith with 
us. 

To prove that, in 
those days, we didn't 
care whether an actor 
was married or not, 
one need only bring 
up the name of Mau- 
rice Costello. This 
man, first of the 
screen idols, not only 
permitted the world 
to know that he had 
a wife and children, 
but frequently used 
little Dolores and 
Helene in his pictures. 



Two Hattons, one with a 
hat on. Raymond admits 
that this picture is sym- 
bolic, that Mrs. Hatton 
has him completely up in 
the air about her 




His career was never hampered by this frankness con- 
cerning his marital state. 

But this is 1928. The stars of yesterday are gone. 
Gone, too, is the awe-struck adoration which we gave 
them. The movie hero of today is dealing with the mod- 
ern movie fan, or trying to. Competition for your favor 
is keen, and many of our married stars or leading men 
are convinced that the bachelor actor 
has the better break. Holding to this 
attitude, he wrestles daily with the 
problem of keeping the wife and chil- 
dren out of print. 

As I recall it, Percy Marmont was 
the first motion picture actor to make 
this request of me. Some four or five 
years ago, when this delightful Eng- 
lishman was enjoying a great vogue in 
America, I asked him to pose with 
his wife and family for some home 
portraits. Very gracefully but defi- 
nitely he declined. To do Mr. Mar- 
mont justice, I cannot say that he 
wished to give the impression that he 
was an unmarried man. I really don't 
know whether he did or not. The 
well-known and much-advertised Eng- 
lish reserve may have caused him to 
say that he wished to keep his family 
out of all stories concerning himself. 

Literally a Private Family 

"T don't want them to become public 
property," is how he expressed it. 
Yet Clive Brook, his dignified and 
(Continued on page 90) 



69 




^Aoran 




more i /harming 



Autrey 

She continues to be astonishing, does Lois 
Moran. For, as with every new picture her 
beauty increases, you insist that she's become 
just as pretty as any girl possibly could. And 
then she goes right ahead and proves you wrong 
by becoming still lovelier 



70 





Life 



omseiQV 



Miss Fazenda's Real 
Profession Is That of 
Soul -Doctor Extraordinary 

By Helen Louise Walker 



THIS is not a press-agent yarn. 
This is not a story, fabricated by 
an expert for the purpose of mak- 
ing a player appear a Pollyanna, 
bathed in sweetness and light, prattling 
sentimental platitudes, for the edification 
of the dwellers in Mr. H. L. Mencken's 
celebrated Bible Belt. Those moral citi- 
zens whose regular weekly fifty cents, 
spent in the neighborhood motion picture 
theater, is responsible for the player's 
salary. And incidentally, also for the sal- 
ary of the press agent ! 

This is the story of a real girl. A girl 
who was not afraid to make herself gro- 
tesque that the public might laugh. A girl whose right 
arm is an inch and a half longer than her left, from 
trudging to and from studios over long years, carrying 
a heavy make-up case. A girl who has taken a thousand 
funny falls, and enough custard pies in the face to feed 
a large family for a year of Sunday dinners. A girl 
whose memory of her own lonely, poverty-sad youth, 
whose innate friendly curiosity about people, has made 
her the friend of all the lonely, sad, bewildered people 
she can find in this tawdry, seething, struggling city. 

This is a story about Louise Fazenda. Queen of laugh- 
ter. Gorgeous clown. Mime extraordinary. A naughty, 
feminine Pan whose eyes brim with real, unadulterated 
mirth as she caricatures the human pageant on the screen. 
And underneath the grease paint and the jester's cap 
and bells is a woman whose biggest ambition is to be a 
doctor of human souls. 

A Profession of Friendship 

Qoyou know what I want to do?" she confided. 

"Well — you know — I have a knack, I think, of get- 

ing people's confidence. They tell me things about them- 

elves and ask for my advice. And I love it ! 

"Some day when I am through with pictures I want to 




Reducing herself is only an occasional and 
seemingly unnecessary effort of Louise 
Fazenda's. Her main occupation is reduc- 
ing audiences to hysterics. And when she's 
through with that, she spends her time — 
and money — reducing the hardships of all 
she can 



make a regular business of being friendly 
to people. I mean talking over their 
problems with them and advising them, 
trying to clear up things in their minds 
and help them to get a clear perspective on life. I don't 
mean charity — just giving away money. Anyone can do 
that. But there are so many people who are lonely and 
confused and who need to talk to someone — someone 
friendly. 

"People come to me now. But I feel that I do not have 
enough time to do them justice, although I love to do 
what I can." 

It was obvious that she did what she could. As we 
sat together on the set at First National, we were inter- 
rupted constantly by people who came to tell her of their 
little affairs. 

An old man who told her that his daughter was better. 
Louise rejoiced with him. A girl who wanted to ask 
Miss Fazenda about something. Did she remember? 
Louise remembered and looked concerned. A boy with 
a dog that had learned a new trick and must do it for 
Louise, amid applause which sent his master away beam- 
ing. A pale woman who was worried about Ella. Louise 
would talk to her after a while. A little boy who whis- 
pered of his love for the beautiful teacher with the beauti- 
ful red hat. A prop man whose young wife had achieved 
a "real part in a big picture this time — thanks to you, 
Miss Fazenda!" 

(Continued on page 114) 

71 





Above is J. Warren 
Kerrigan's mother ; and 
at the right is himself, 
as he is today. Below 
is the living-room in the 
home they shared so 
long and so happily 



THIS is the story of 
the House that Jack 
Built. Its happiness and 
sorrows through the years. 
And of the sweet shadows that people it. 

For the house that Jack built wasn't built solely of 
wood and plaster and glass and paint. It was built with 
character, too, and deep human experience. 

So this is the story of a man who has seen visions — 
who, when his best beloved passed, caught a glimpse of 
eternity and found out a little about what heaven means, 
and life and death — who interests himself widely but 
very quietly now in many charities, the flood of his 
human love thus widening itself in quiet streams that 
water thirsty places. 

A.nd_ then there is his invalid brother, for whom, it is 
said, his tenderness and care never falter. 

I found Jack Kerrigan on the veranda of his rambling 
old home or, to be more exact, on his front lawn. One 
always does. He came to greet me. If one doesn't know 
him well, one speaks of him as J. Warren Kerrigan. But 
then, practically everybody does feel that he knows Jack. 
_ Even the truck drivers who have regular routes past 
his house — taking furniture and hardware and what-not, 
up to Bakersfield and other places, through the Cahuenga 
Pass — feel that they know Kerrigan and are his friends. 

72 



oMotherto 

Guide Him 



With Her Passing Passed 

J. Warren Kerrigan's Interest 

in His Life-Work 

By Grace Kingsley 



"He always waves to us boys as we drive by, if 
we wave to him!" one exclaimed in delight the 
other clay to Lois Wilson's chauffeur, and the 
chauffeur told Lois. But Lois, you may be. 
sure, knew it already. 
Jack and Lois were supposed to have been 
engaged once. But nothing came of it. 
Maybe they never were. Yet there are 
those who say that Jack's love for his 
mother and his love for Lois were the 
two great devotions of his life. 
Jack has never married. You see he has 
always had responsibilities. First there 
were his six brothers and his sister. His 
dad was an Irish politician and you know 
what that means. Sometimes there was 
money and sometimes there was not. Jack 
was almost the sole suppor-t of the family 
after he was thirteen years old. His mother 
became an invalid, but that wasn't until much 
later, after she had done well her job of raising 
the seven. 
Even that wasn't all. The invalid brother was an 
invalid from the time he was four years old, when 
he had scarlet fever. He was always, somehow, Jack's 
peculiar care. He is yet. 

{Continued on page 112) 




P. S. Cleveland 



"flatter your Hands" 

says BILLIE BURKE 

This famous stage beauty . . . New York's smartest set . . . 
all these gay, clever women use this NewCutex Liquid Polish 



HOW do they keep their busy, 
capable hands exquisite and 
pretty when they use them for so 
much interesting active work? 

Women who combine a career and 
a brilliant social life tell us the 
answer is quite simple. Just the 
New Cutex Liquid Polish which pro- 
tects the nails so they cannot look 
grubby no matter what you do. 

Applied once a week it gives new 
personality to the hands. Its lovely 
brilliance lasts day after day in spite 
of wear or water. Stains and dirt 
that usually discolor and roughen 
the nails disappear when you wash 
your hands. Your fingertips remain 
shining — exquisitely chic — for a 
whole week! 





Miss Ivy Maddison 



"Riding-togs Require 

Impeccable Nails" 
says New York horsewoman 

"To keep my nails in condition," 
says Miss Ivy Maddison, well-known 
New York horsewoman and winner 
at many smart Horse Shows, "I 
always use a liquid polish — the New 
Cutex kind — which withstands per- 
spiration and washing. It's very 
natural-looking, perfectly sporting, 
and, in my opinion, the nicest pos- 
sible finish for any sportswoman's 
hands." 



Miss Burke's 
expressive hands 



Billie Burke keeps her 

hands lovely with the 
NewCutex Liquid Polish 

At a Palm Beach fancy dress ball or 
at her stately country home, she is 
just the golden haired merry young 
woman who married Florenz Zieg- 
feld, whose plays assemble the most 
beautiful women in America. 

"I love the stage," says Billie 
Burke, "but I also love simple coun- 
try things — gardens, woods, tramps — 
dogs. What 
terrible things 
it does to my 
hands ! 



The 
New 
Liquid 
Polish 




"Chez Ninon" 
advises this polish 

Mrs. Nona McAdoo Cowles, New 
York and Washington society woman, 
presides over the smart little Madi- 
son Avenue shop "Chez Ninon." 

"Of course, I use Cutex Liquid 
Polish," she says. " It's so thoroughly 
becoming — makes the whole hand 
look prettier and better groomed — 
gives a clever touch of sparkle." 




"I find the new Cutex Liquid Polish 
protects the nails from stains and 
dirt and is so flattering. In fact, I 
adore all the Cutex preparations — 
the Cuticle Cream — and the Remover. 
My friends say, 'What lovely half- 
moons you have!' " 

Give your hands personality with 
this new Polish. With Polish Re- 
mover 50c; without Remover, 35c. 
Northam Warren, New York, London, Paris 

Special introductory offer — for 6c 



Send 6c and coupon below for sample of 
New Cutex Liquid Polish. (If in Canada, 
address Dept. M-9, Post Office Box No. 
2054, Montreal, Canada.) 

Northam Warren, Dept. M-9, 
114 West 17th St.,. New York 



73 




Pauline Starke, whose delicate beauty is 

reflected in the mirror, says, "Lux Toilet 

Soap keeps my skin beautifully even 

and smooth." 




Bebe Daniels, piquant Paramount star and the bathroom 

designed for her loveliness. She says — "Lux Toilet Soap is a 

great help in keeping the skin smooth and lovely." 









Corinne Griffith knows how much lovely skin adds to a 

girl's attractiveness. "Lux Toilet Soap's wonderful lather 

gives my skin the same velvety smoothness expensive French 

soaps do," says this First National star. 




Lois Moran takes the 
most exqu isite care of 
her blonde loveliness 
— "Even the most 
expensive French 
soaps could not leave 
my skin more won- 
derfully smooth than 
Lux Toilet Soap 
does," declares this 
Fox star. 






In the 

bathrooms 

screen stars 

ing rooms of 

studios Lux 

for lovely 




Joan Crawford, M. G. M. star, 
whose lovely smooth skin has 
won millions of hearts, says, 
"Lux Toilet Soap keeps my 
skin so smooth." 



74 





L: 



Vivacious Clara Bow and the lovely bathroom inspired 
by her beauty. "Lux Toilet Soap keeps my skin in per- 
fect condition," says this delightful Paramount star. 




Winsome Mary Brian is most fastidious about 
all her toilet accessories. "Lux Toilet Soap 
certainly keeps 'studio skin' in perfect con- 
dition," says this Paramount star. 



luxurious 

of 9 out Of IO 

and in the dress- 
all the great film 
Toilet Soap is used 
smooth skin. 



A GIRL'S smooth, soft skin — how deeply it moves 
you — and how it glorifies every other charm! 
To screen successfully in the close-up, directors say 
a star must have skin of utter smoothness — "studio 
skin," for make-up is very little help und^r the 
blazing lights. 

Nine out of ten screen stars care for their priceless 
skin with Lux Toilet Soap. There are in Hollywood 
433 important actresses including all stars. 417 of 
these use Lux Toilet Soap!— 96%! 

All the great film studios have made it the official 
soap in their dressing rooms. 

Buy some today. The smoothness the delicately 
fragrant, white cake gives your skin will delight you. 



Luxury hitherto found only 

in French soaps 
at 50c or $1.00 a cake . . . 



in French soaps f )%L 



now 




Myrna Loy, for whose auburn-haired beauty this 

unique bathroom was designed. " Lux Toilet Soap 

leaves my skin beautifully smooth," says this 

lovely Warner Brothers star. 





■.■■is::-*: : 



Dorothy Mackaill has the exquisite skin of a 
true English beauty. "The close-up takes the 
true measure of a screen star's beauty. I find 
Lux Toilet Soap lovely for the skin," says this 
First National star. 



75 








II Feet on Deck! 



This apparently was the order of the day aboard 
a steamship off Catalina Island during the recent 
filming of a picture. And Mary Brian and Jack 
Luden were quick to obey it. They show here 
the latest manner in which two step the one-step 



76 



They gave me the ha-ha 

when I offered to play 

. . . but I was the life of the party after that 




THE first day of Dorothy's house party 
at her cottage on the shore had been a 
huge success. With an afternoon of swim- 
ming, boating and golfing we were all set 
for the wonderful dinner that followed. 

"Well, folks," said Bill enthusiastically, 
as we were leaving the table, "I don't know 
how you feel, but I'm all pepped up for a 
good dance." 

"Fine!" cried Dorothy. "Dick Roberts 
has his banjo and can sure make it hum. 
Now who can play the piano?" 

Instantly the laughter and merriment ceased. 
All looked at one another foolishly. But no one 
said a word. 

"How about *you Jim, you play, don't you?" 
asked Dot. 

"Yes I'll play 'Far, Far Away,'" laughed Jim. 

"Well then, Mabel, will you help us out?" 

"Honestly, Dot, I hate to admit it, but I can't 
play a note," she answered. 

It certainly looked as if the party were going flat. 
Plenty of dancers but no one to play. 

Then I Offered to Play 

"If you folks can stand it," I offered shyly, "I'll 
play for you." 

The crowd, silent until now, instantly burst out 
in laughter. 

"You may be able to play football, Jack, but 
you can't tackle a piano." 

"Quit your kidding," cut in another. "I've 
never heard you play a note and I've known you 
all your life." 

"There isn't a bar of music in your whole make- 
up," laughed Mabel. 

A feeling of embarrassment mingled with re- 
sentment came over me. But as I strode to 
trie piano I couldn't help chuckling 
to myself when I thought of the 
surprise I had in store for them. 

No one knew what to expect. 
They thought I was about to make 
a fool of myself. Some laughed. 
Others watched me wide-eyed. 

Then — I struck the first snappy 
chords of that foot-loosing fox- 
trot "St. Louis Blues." Dick was 
so dumbfounded he almost dropped 
his banjo. But in a flash he had 
picked up the rhythm and was 
strumming away like mad. 

Although they could hardly be- 
lieve their ears, the crowd were all 
on their feet in a jiffy. And how 
they danced! Fox-trots, waltzes — ■ 



• PICK 


YOUR 


INSTRUMENT 


Piano 


Violin 


Organ 


Clarinet 


Ukulele 


Flute 


Cornet 


Saxophone 


Trombone 


Harp 


Piccolo 


Mandolin 


Guitar 


'Cello 


Hawaiian 


Steel Guitar 


Si^ht Singing 


Piano 


Accordion 


Voice and 


Speech Culture 


Harmony and Composition 


Drums 


and Traps 


Automatic 


Finger Control 


Banjo (Ple< 


trum, 5-String 


or 


Tenor) 



with rests few and 
far between. 

After a good round 
of dancing I decided 
to give them some 
real music and began 
a beautiful Indian love lyric. 

The couples, who but a moment before had 
been dancing merrily, were now seated quietly 
about the room, entranced by that plaintive melody. 

No sooner had the last soft notes died away than 
I was surrounded by my astonished friends. Ques- 
tions were fired at me from all sides. 

"How wonderful, Jack! Why haven't you played 
for us before?" 

"How long have you been studying?" 
"Why have you kept it a secret all these years 
when you might have been playing for us?" 

"Who gave you lessons? He must be won- 
derful!" 

I Reveal My Secret 

Then I explained how some time before I made 
up my mind 'to go in for something besides sports. 
I wanted to be able to play — to entertain others— 
to be popular. But when I thought of the great 
expense and the years of study and practice re- 
quired, I hesitated. 

Then one day I ran across an announcement in a 
magazine telling of a new. quick and simple way 
to learn music at home., without a teacher.* 

I was a little skeptical at first, 
but it was just what I wanted so 
I sent for the free booklet and 
demonstration lesson. The moment 
I saw it I was convinced and sent 
for the complete course at once. 

When the lessons arrived, I started 
right in, giving a few minutes of my 
spare time each day. And what 
fun it was — even from the very be- 
ginning. No monotonous scales — - 
no tedious exercises — no tricky 
methods — just a simple, common- 
sense system that even a child could 
understand. And best of all I was 
playing my favorite numbers almost 
from the start. 



Anyone can learn to play this easy no-teacher way 
— right at home. The piano if desired; or any 
other instrument that you may choose. Almost half 
a million people have learned to play by this simple 
system in less than half the time it takes by the old- 
fashioned methods. And regardless of what instru- 
ment you pick, the cost averages only a few cents 
a day. 

Send for Free Booklet and 
Demonstration Lesson 

To prove how simple and practical this remark- 
able course is, the U. S. School of Music has ar- 
ranged a typical demonstration lesson and ex- 
planatory booklet which you may have for the 
asking. So if you really want to learn to play — if 
you wish to win a host of friends — to be popular 
everywhere — write for this free booklet and valuable 
demonstration lesson. 

Don't delay, act at once — fill in and mail the 
attached coupon today — no obligation whatever. 

Instruments supplied when needed, cash or 
credit. U. S. School of Music, 609 Brunswick Bldg., 
New York City. 



U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC, 

609 Brunswick Bldg., New York City 

Please send me your free book, "Music Lessons in Your 
Own Home," with introduction by Dr. Frank Crane, dem- 
onstration lesson, and particulars of your easy payment 
plan. I am interested in the following: course: 



Have you above instrument? 

Name 

(Please write plainly) 

Address 

City State 

77 







Kendall Evans 



Her Full Measure of Beauty 

In herself and In the vessel right next to herself, Virginia Bradford has it. And for this, and for the skill 
with which she is enacting one of the more prominent roles in "Craig's Wife," there is every reason why 

Virginia deserves to have her pitcher in the papers 



78 




24 New Pictures and the Next 
Six Issues of Motion Picture Magazine 



Subjects : 



Mary Astor 
Clara Bow 
James Hall 
Jack Holt 
Fred Thomson 
Sally O'Neil 
Ruth Taylor 
Ralph Forbes 
Olive Borden 
John Gilbert 
Dolores Costello 
Marcelline Day 
Renee Adoree 
Eleanor Boardman 
Charles Farrell 
Tom Mix 
Rudolph Valentino 
Janet Gaynor 
Joan Crawford 
June Collyer 
Vilma Banky 
Ramon Novarro 
Rod LaRocque 
Lloyd Hughes 



You can have this wonderful set of pictures of your favorites if you act 
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Motion Picture Publications, Inc., Offer No. 3. 

Paramount Bldg., New York. 

For the enclosed $1.00 please send me the set of twenty-four new 
pictures of motion picture stars and the next six issues of MOTION 
PICTURE MAGAZINE. 

Name 

Address 

Start with .issue. 



79 



The Answer Man 




KATUSHA — I can supply you 
with a photo of Ramon Novarro, 
but not as he appeared in "Ben- 
Hur." Esther Ralston was born 
in Bar Harbor, Maine, in 1902. 
She's five feet five inches tall, 
weighs 125 pounds, has blonde 
hair and blue eyes. Her latest picture is 
"Sawdust Paradise"; write her at the Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. Write me any time. I'm al- 
ways glad to hear from you. 

LUCILLE — William Haines's latest pic- 
ture is "Excess Baggage." William Bake- 
well was Tex McNeil, and Neil Neely, Bob 
Speei-y in 'West Point." Helen Lynch 
was born April 21, 1903. In regard to 
Jack Mulhall's relations, I would suggest 
you write direct to Jack at the First Na- 
tional Studios, Burbank, Cal. What makes 
you think I'm Herbert Rawlinson? He's 
a movie star. But thanks for the com- 
pliment. 

MARY JANE K.— Charles Rogers was 
born August 13, 1904. His latest picture 
is "Red Lips." Write Buddy at the Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. Adolphe Menjou was married 
to Kathryn Caryer, in Paris. Jacqueline 
Logan is playing in "Power." "The Pur- 
ple Mask" was produced by Universal, in 
January, 1917, a serial of fifteen episodes, 
starring Grace Cunard and Francis Ford. 

A RED-HEAD OF ST. LOUIS— You 
carrot tops hail from all points. Barry 
Norton was Bryon Dashwood, Lane Chand- 
ler, Holobird in "The Legion of the Con- 
demned." Clara Bow is five feet two and 



I'll answer as many letters in MOTION PICTURE MAGA- 
ZINE as space permits and reply by mail to the others. Write 
your name and address and enclose stamps or addressed envelope. 
The Answer Man, Motion Picture Magazine, Paramount Building, 
1501 Broadway, New York City. 




Here are the five leaders of my fan mail. 
The place of honor goes to Buddy Rogers 
because last month I received more in- 
quiries on him than any other player 

one-half inches tall, weighs 109 pounds. 
That is her real name. Buster Collier is 
playing in "Tide of Empire," starring 
Renee Adoree. Don't know whether Ra- 
mon Novarro prefers red heads or not. 
Why not write him at the Metro-Goldwyn 
Studios, Culver City, Cal. ? 



MERELY MARY— Allene Ray 
and Walter Miller are co-starring 
again in "Terrible People," a 
serial produced by Pathe Stu- 
dios, 4500 Sunset Blvd., Holly- 
wood, Cal. Allene and Edward 
Hearne played in "The Yellow 
Cameo," also a serial. Esther and Jobyna 
Ralston are not related. Jobyna is mar- 
ried to Richard Arlen. Her latest picture 
is "The Toilers," starring Douglas Fair- 
banks, Jr.; write them at the Tiffany-Stahl 
Prod., 933 N. Seward St., Hollywood, Cal. 

SEBASTIAN— Cheerio! Richard Ar- 
len was born in Charlottesville, Va., twen- 
ty-nine years ago. That's his real name. 
His next picture will be "Beggars of Life." 
Lewis Sargent plays opposite Alberta 
Vaughn in "Racing Blood," a serial, in 
production at the FBO Studios, 780 Cower 
St., Hollywood, Cal. Laura La Plante's 
latest picture is "The Last Warning." Ad- 
dress your letter to her at the Universal 
Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

DONA CATALINA— I like your sta- 
tionery. Theodore Von Eltz was the cap- 
tain in "The Great Mail Robbery." Rich- 
ard Dix has recovered nicely from his 
operation, thank you. His next picture 
will be "Warming Up." Dolores del Rio 
was born in Durango, Mexico, August 3, 
1905. She is playing in "Revenge." Barry 
Norton is single, send him that note care 
the Fox Studios, 1401 N. Western Ave., 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

BROWN-EYED— I'll excuse your long 
letter ; guess the column will hold 'em all. 
(Continued on page 87) 






Sue Carol seems to be gaining 

in popularity. She was a close 

second to Buddy 



Charles Farrell is third. I can 

always depend on Farrell's fans 

to keep me busy 




Fourth is Billie Dove. Her 

admiring fans certainly want to 

know a lot about her 



And so many of Ramon No- 
varro's fans have been writing. 
He is fifth among the leaders 



80 



New! 





Just ATwist Of The Wrist 

Banishes Old Style Can Openers to the Scrap Heap and 

Brings Agents $5 to $12 in an Hour 

Here is a truly revolutionary invention! It is something that every woman has been waiting and hoping for. Now all 
the danger and wastefulness of old-style can openers is ended. Now, every home in the land can open cans the new, simple, 
safe, easy way by a handy little machine. Now, no man whose present income is less than $60 a week can afford to ignore 
the amazing new opportunity for real money that this novel invention has created. Read the GENEROUS FREE TEST 
offer below. Then act at once. 




AGENTS! 

FULL TIME 

$265 in a Week 

"Here is my record 
for first 30 days with 
Speedo: June 13, 60 
Speedos; June 20, 84 
-w Speedos; June 30, 192 

"Speedos; July 6, 288 Speedos. Speedo 
sells to 9 out of 10 prospects. 

M. Omoff, Va. 

SPARE TIME— $9 First Half Day 

"The first afternoon I received 
my Speedo outfit I made $9." 

Mrs. R. Spain, Kans. 

PART TIME— $20 in 3 Hours 

" I worked about three hours and 
took 25 orders. This is certainly a 
money-maker." 

0. C. Gregg, Wyo. 



WOMEN universally detest the old-style can 
opener. Yet in practically every home 
cans are being opened with it, often several 
times a day. Imagine then, how thankfully 
they welcome this new method — ■ 
this automatic way of doing their 
most distasteful job. With the 
wonderful little Speedo can opener 
you just put the can in the machine, 
turn the handle, and almost in- 
stantly the job is done. 



So I've worked out a plan by which you can examine 
the invention and test its profit possibilities without 
risking one penny of your own money. 

Mail Coupon Today 



A "Million Dollar" Can 
Opening Machine 



READ! 



One of my prospects told me 
she could get along with the old 
can opener she had been using 
for years. Two weeks later her 
husband ordered a can opener 
from me saying that his wife 
had cut her hand badly with 
her old can opener. — W. L. 
GODSHALK, Pa. 



All I ask you to do is to fill out and 
mail the coupon below. You do not 
obligate yourself in any way whatever. 
I'll rush you the details. Get my free 
test offer while the territory you want 
is still open — I'll hold it for you while 
you make the test. I'll send you all the 
facts about $75 to $150 a week with 
Speedo. I'll also tell you about another 
fast selling item in the Central States 
line that brings you two profits on every 
call. All you risk is a 2c stamp — so grab 
your pencil and shoot me the coupon 
right now. 




New Kind of Sharpener 

Another amazing, knock-'em dead, 
household specialty. Every house- 
wife needs it. Puts a razor edge on 
anything that cuts — knives, tools, 
etc. The queerest thing you ever 
saw! A real money-maker! The 
coupon brings full details. 



The Speedo holds the can — opens it— flips up the 
lid so you can grab it — and gives you back the can with- 
out a drop spilled, without any rough edges to snag your 
fingers — all in a couple of seconds! It's so easy even 
a 10-year-old child can do it in perfect safety! No wonder 
women — and men, too — simply go wild over it! And 
no wonder Speedo salesmen often sell to every house in 
the block and make up to $10 an hour either spare or 
full time. 

Generous Free 
Test Offer 

Frankly, men, I realize that 
the facts about this proposition 
as outlined briefly here may seem 
almost incredible to you. I'll grant 
you that the profit possibilities 
are so tremendous that it's impos- 
sible to give more than a mere 
hint of them here. 



PATENTED HOUSEHOLD SPECIALTIES 

CENTRAL STATES MFG. CO. 

Established Over 20 Years 
Dept. M-2061, 4500 Mary Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

| " ~ } 

I Central States Mfg. Co., « 

4500 Mary Ave., Dept. M-2061, St. Louis, Mo. 

Yes, rush me the facts and details of your FREE J 
■ TEST OFFER. 

| Name | 

j Address | 

I City State ' 

I - -I 

81 




reak fasts for Mornings After 



By Betty Standish 



What Clara Bow Eats Depends 
Upon Whether She Wants to 
Cultivate or Discourage 
5L. Insomnia 




HE had made violent love to her. She had repulsed 
him. He offered her wine. She sipped a bit of 
it. Her bobbed head reeled. At one o'clock she 
said she must go home. He locked the door. It 
went on like that until the wee, small hours of the morn- 
ing, and then the director said the Clara Bow company 
could go home. 

If there is anything soggier than a breakfast without 
having had any previous sleep, Clara can't think of it. 
The It girl of the screen ought to know. She's shot more 
night scenes and seen more sunrises than a night-watch- 
man. It's all because Clara's pictures are so popular 
they burn up the box-office and a star making $8,000 per 
doesn't enjoy the privileges of the eight-hour union law. 

What does a girl eat who has been up all night? The 
flapper debutantes could tell you. So 
can Clara. If she has to hurry back 
to the studio after snatching a few 
hours' sleep, she orders something 
like the menu to the right. 

The difference between the two 
menus is that one is stimulating and 
the other is sedative. 

If you want to be on your toes and 
up and doing the first thing in the 
morning, you can't beat a glass of 
strained tomato juice. It clears the 
brain and promotes a lot of energy. 
All you need for this is a can of to- 
mato puree and a strainer. Serve 
cold. 

The eggs soft boiled are a further 
stimulant. If you can eat a raw egg, 
so much the better. If you can't, 



MENU 



Glass of strained tomato juice 

Soft-boiled egg 

Melba toast 

Coffee 

But if the studio has granted 
her the day off and she can crawl 
into bed and go to sleep, she 
substitutes the order following: 

Glass of warm milk 

Oatmeal 

French toast with bacon 

No coffee 



don't cook it over two minutes at the very utmost. 
Melba toast is bread cut as thin as possible and toasted 
on both sides in the oven. It may be buttered, but it will 
be crisper and fresher if you can do without butter. 

Everybody knows that coffee wakes you up, and it 
makes just the right finishing touch to the breakfast that 
is guaranteed to put you on your feet no matter what 
happened the night before. 

The other menu promotes sleep and nothing is more 
conducive to a good rest than a glass of warm milk. If 
you're bothered with insomnia, you want to try this. You 
can't go wrong. 

Oatmeal is another restful dish and is soothing to the 
nerves as well. Serve very hot and don't stint yourself on 
the butter and sugar and cream. 

French toast is prepared by dipping 
bread into a mixture of egg and milk 
and then frying it. Garnished with 
bacon, this adds the necessary filling 
touch that is guaranteed to make you 
sleepy. 

Don't forget to forego the coffee 
with this diet. No matter how much 
hot milk you drink, you aren't going 
to sleep if you top it off with a cup of 
coffee. 

Remember that the first menu is for 
warding off sleep and that this sec- 
ond one is for courting it. Every 
item just named should make for a 
pleasant drowsiness ; and to include 
with the meal anything stimulating 
will defeat the entire purpose of the 
breakfast. 



82 



—shaped to jit 

—softened io ease 

— deodorizes to protect 

^IMPROVED KOTEX 



Deodorizes . . . 

and 4. other important 
features 



1 — Softer gauze ends 

chafing; pliable filler ab- 
sorbs as no other sub- 
stance can; 

2 — Corners are rounded 

and tapered; no evidence 
of sanitary protection 
under any gown ; 

3— Deodorizes -safely, 
thoroughly, by a new 
and exclusive patented 
process ; 

^—Adjust it to your needs; 

filler may be made thin- 
ner, thicker, narrower, 
as required; 

and 

5— It is easily disposed of; 
no unpleasant laundry. 




SINCE the comfort of sanitary protection is as much mental as phy- 
sical, Kotex scientists have sought and found the way to end two 
important feminine fears: The new pad safely, thoroughly deodorizes, 
by a patented process. No longer does this oppressive thought of 
offending others interfere with the day's activities, at any time. 

All feeling of conspicuousness is gone, since Kotex is now cut to fitj 
Rounded, tapered corners conform to the lines of the body. There is 
no awkward bulkiness to indicate the presence of sanitary protection. 

While these changes were being made, a way was found to soften 
the gauze, to render the downy filler more pliable, even more absor- 
bent. Consequently you are assured of gentler, more thorough comfort 
than ever before. If you need a thinner or thicker pad, all you do is 
adjust the filler. And Kotex is so easy to dispose of. 

All its old advantages remain. When you try it, you will understand 
■why doctors and nurses endorse it so heartily, A box of 12 is 45c, at any 
drug, dry goods or department store. 




KOT6X 



83 





J±t last 
I HAVE FOUND THE 

JTerfect JVLanicure 

B Y MISS ROSALINE DUNN 



The women of New York's 
smartest society are my 
clients. Their patronage is 
my reward for a life devoted 
to the art of manicuring. 
For years I have studied 
the care of the nails and 
hands, always striving to 
achieve exquisite perfec- 
tion . . . to give nails an alluring, lustrous 
tint of the correct shade, and frame each 
one in a soft, pink cuticle curve of beauty. 
Then from Paris came the whisper that 
liquid polishes had been created. I tried 
all of them. But some of them peeled or 
dulled in spots. Others gave the nails an 
unnatural tint that was too obvious. 

Then just when I despaired of ever real- 
izing my ambitions I discovered the Glazo 
Manicure. What a happy meeting! 

The marvelous Glazo Polish brings to 
nails such enchanting loveliness. Its radiant 
beauty makes the hands seem fairer. 

It will keep your nails as perfectly 
groomed, as beautiful as if I were manicur- 
ing them for you. And the Glazo Cuticle 
Oil (for those who prefer, the Glazo Cuti- 
cle Cream) softens the cuticle and keeps 
it smooth, pink, and beautifully curved. 
Let the Glazo Company send you the 
little lesson book I have prepared. It tells 
you how to hide traces of work and keep 
your hands youthful. Also, it explains the 
latest method of manicuring the hands. 

Your favorite shop sells Glazo. Its price, 
— including the remover, 50c. Known as 
Galo in England and the Colonies. 




The Glazo Co. 
669 Blair Avenue 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

Please send me Miss Dunn's booklet and the miniature Glazo 
manicure set, ioc enclosed. 

Name 

Street 

City 




y . . -, 



i _V ' ' L, 



Speaking of dangerous sports, there's mumblety-peg. Just look at Polly Ann Young and 
Johnny Mack Brown pooh-poohing peril and literally taking their knives in their hands 

Hollywood's Seven Deadly Cliques 

(Continued from page 45) 



nothing on the hip but the unavoidable 
birthmark. 

Ronald Colman, Charles Lane, William 
Powell and Richard Barthelmess form a 
clique of slightly bored bachelor bon- 
vivants, with Florence Yidor, the only 
woman in the circle, as a sort of queen 
whose taste and breeding are so impec- 
cable that she's never de trop. Since Bar- 
thelmess's re-marriage the clique has be- 
come smaller and more exclusive than 
ever. This group stands for choice wines 
and food, perfect clothes and everything 
of superlative excellence ; for impatience 
with Hollywood's general crudeness ; for 
terms of address like "my dear chap." 

Simple outdoor and home life is repre- 
sented by the largely English clique of 
Clive Brook, Philip Strange, Percy Mar- 
mont, H. B. Warner and Warner Baxter. 
Among these the simple things of life are 
most appreciated. A dog, a well-seasoned 
briar pipe, a good book (without even a 
thou) — these are the caviar they desire. 
They keep fit with tennis, golf and week- 
ends at the beach. 

Harold Lloyd has a clique all of his 
own. It consists merely of the members 
of his staff at the studio, with whom he 
goes around most of the time. The 
Lloyd clique stands for democracy. Every- 
body, high or low, on the Lloyd staff 
automatically belongs to the gang, and the 
gang amuses itself going to ball games 
and prize-fights, riding to them as often 
as not in decrepit Fords intended for use 
in the studio transporting props. 

Ah, Zoze Americains! 

""The up-to-the-minute young American 
clique is that of Evelyn Brent, Pris- 
cilla Dean, Les Arnold (the world flier), 
Dorothy Herzog (scenario writer) and 
Gary Cooper, with some others tagging 
along in their wake. They get up late, use 
plenty of lip-stick, smoke cigarettes, light 
one from the other all day, spend their 
money on clothes and parties. They are the 
backbone supporting such places as the 



Montmartre Cafe, the Cocoanut Grove and 
other eat -while -you -dance institutions. 
They chew gum recklessly. 

One might describe as the overgrown 
high-school kid clique the last battalion 
of Hollywood society. It consists of Car- 
melita Geraghty, Zasu Pitts, Ralph Forbes, 
Charles Farrell, Virginia Yalli, Julanne 
Johnston and Hedda Hopper. This is the 
gang whose most ecstatic delight would be 
to see Cecil de Mille slip on a banana peel 
while acting as master of ceremonies at 
an opening. They would giggle hyster- 
ically about it for hours afterward. You 
always see these boys and girls at Occa- 
sions of Note, with bells on. 

The seven cliques of Hollywood society 
cannot be broken into — that is the law. 
One does not ask a member of a clique to 
dinner without asking at least one other 
member. If you invited Evelyn Brent, 
Harold Lloyd, Charles Farrell, Florence 
Yidor, Marion Davies and Enid Bennett 
to dine with you, it's ten to one none of 
them would turn up. The only exception 
to the rule is that one is allowed to ask 
and be asked by players in one's current 
picture, even if they do not strictly belong. 

It is very much not done to ask people 
to bring anybody to a party, as used to be 
the thing in Hollywood's early days. 
Guests must be carefully selected, or they 
leave. The last stronghold of "bring any- 
body" is James Cruze's house, EJintridge, 
where every Sunday there is open house. 
The outsiders from Hollywood society are 
the chief guests at Flintridge. 

Among the more important outsiders 
may be named Pola Negri, Mae Murray, 
the Costellos, the Barrymores, Gilbert and 
Garbo, and Lon Chaney. A few younger 
players who have not yet become Holly- 
woodized also retain their primitive de- 
sire to forget what the world thinks of 
them and enjoy themselves. The Fair- 
bankses entertain real society from 
Europe, and remain blissfully aloof. 

Hollywood society is at once the most and 
the least exclusive group in the world. 



84 



Believers in Santa Claus 

(Continued from page 67) 

leads with Reginald Denny and a nice 
salary, but " 

After all, Reginald Denny leads and 
a nice salary can hardly be called artis- 
tic, no matter how high the ambition. Be-, 
lieve it or not, but I have a hunch Bar- 
bara wants to "create." 

"When some big part comes up out 
there, I just pray I'll get it, but they al- 
ways put me off. I'm not old enough or 
something. When I let myself get a little 
bit discouraged, I stop to realize that 
Janet Gaynor and Fay Wray used to be 
out there, too, and all they got was West- 
erns." 

Barbara looks pretty when she gets sin- 
cere like that. She looks well in almost 
any mood. She has a sort of delicate 
prettiness. Brunette. Light eyes. Slender, 
straight nose. Fine lips. White throat. 
A great boon to the close-ups, I should 
imagine, with her fresh, eight-hour-rested 
look. 

Yes, she rests a great deal. She doesn't 
chase around to parties at night. In the 
very midst of the Montmartre informality, 
Barbara knew hardly a soul to yell at. 
With her husband, Tamar Lane, she at- 
tends the movies in the evenings, and when 
she has a real vacation from the studio 
they move out to their ranch and get up 
early in the morning and ride horseback. 
She doesn't smoke. And if she ever sipped 
anything harder than ginger ale, it doesn't 
show on her. Barbara says about the 
most exciting time they have is over the 
holidays. Any holiday will do. She's par- 
ticularly fond of Easter and dyeing Eas- 
ter eggs and hiding them. 

Barbara says she comes of a large fam- 
ily, and holidays are always big events 
with a large family. It was an adven- 
(Continned on page 89) 





Make This Convincing Beauty Bath 
Test OnYour Hands Now 




— INSTANTLY YOUR SKIN 

FEELS SOFT AND SMOOTH 

AS A ROSE PETAL 



The beach where Myrna Loy bathes isn't 

crowded, but she insists upon wearing this 

sleeveless coat as a wrap, just to give herself 

elbow room 



HERE is a remarkable test. It 
will prove to you in less than 
a MINUTE that your skin can feel 
smooth as a baby's. 

Simply swish a few handfuls of 
Linit in a basin of warm water; then 
wash your hands, using a little soap. 
Immediately after drying you are 
aware of a soothing softness— your 
skin feels smooth as the down of a 
rose petal. 



THIS test is so convincing that 
you will want to use Linit in 
your bath. Merely dissolve half a 
package or more of Linit in your 
tub and bathe as usual. A bath in 
the richest cream couldn't be 
more delightful or have such 
effective and immediate results. 



The exquisite softness of your 
skin is due to a thin layer of Linit 
that is left on the skin after your 
bath. This invisibly thin "coating" 
of Linit harmlessly absorbs per- 
spiration, eliminates shine from 
the skin and in cases of irritation 
is most soothing. 

Starch from Corn is the main 
ingredient of Linit. Being a vege- 
table product, Linit is free from 
any mineral properties that might 
injure the skin and cause irritation. 
In fact, the purity and soothing 
quality of Starch from Corn are 
regarded so highly by doctors and 
dermatologists, that they gen- 
erally recommend it for the ten- 
der and sensitive skin of young 
babies. 




LINIT is so economical that at least you should 
give it a trial. Let results speak for themselves. 

Link is sold by your grocer 



THE BATHWW TO ASOfT SMOOTH SKIN • .y 



85 




Freckles 

Secretly and Quickly Removed! 

YOU can banish those annoying, 
embarrassing freckles, quickly 
and surely, in the privacy of your 
own boudoir. Your friends will won- 
der how you did it. 

Stillman's Freckle Cream bleaches 
them out while you sleep. Leaves the 
skin soft and white, the complexion 
fresh, clear and transparent, the face 
rejuvenated with new beauty of 
natural coloring. 

The first jar proves its magic worth. 
Results guaranteed, or money re- 
funded. At all druggists, 50c and $1. 

St ill mans 



Freckle Cream 

] Whitens 
1 The Skin 



Removes 
Freckles 



•39 



The Stillman Co., 33 Rosemary Lane, Aurora, 111. ! 
Send me your FREE booklet on skin | 
treatment. 



Name.. 



Address.. 



City 



. State.. 



DEL-/VTONE 

Removes Hair in 3 Minutes 




Skin Without Hair 

"I've tried other methods but I give all praise 
to Del-a-tone. It's far better than shaving or 
pulling hair out by the roots, and it tends to 
discourage regrowth." 

Adds that touch of daintiness so essential to feminine 
charm. The standard depilatory for 20 years. Del-a-tone 
Cream is snow-white,f ragrant.andready for immediate use. 

Removes hair in only 3 minutes from arms, under 
arms, legs, back of neck or face. Leaves skin smooth, 
white, dainty. Del-a-tone Cream or Powder is sold by 
drug and department stores, or sent prepaid, in plain wrap- 
per.in U.S. for $1.00. Money back if desired. For generous 
sample send 10c to Miss Mildred Hadley, Dept. 79, 
The Delatone Co., 721 N. Michigan Ave. Chicago, 111. 




"1 



ELOON KE'UEV- 



After seeing the luxury in which the screen vamps live, Anna Moore says that the next mid- 
winter night she is told never to darken a door again, she wants the furs that go to the erring 

Some Figures From Fiction Visit Hollywood 

{Continued from page 53) 



unladylike language," said Papa sternly. 
"You know I don't approve of it. How- 
ever, I will forgive you, so run along and 
put on your bonnet and we'll start for the 
Sennett Studio." 

"But, dear Papa, Little Eva is going to 
Heaven on the Fox lot, today," broke 
in Elsie shyly. "I should dearly love to 
see her." 

"Now, Elsie," Papa said sternly, "what 
did I tell you about impertinence?" 

"I am so sorry I was so disobedient and 
so naughty," Elsie sighed. "But dear Papa, 
I have been a very dood 'ittle durl this 
week. I've been making presents for the 
stars. Won't Jack Gilbert love this set 
of antimacassars for his best chairs ? I 
crocheted them all by my own little self. 
And here's a lovely blue bed- jacket for 
Gloria Swanson and a couple of bean bags 
for Vilma Banky and Rod La Roque to 
play with on long winter evenings. 

"And I made something for Little Eva, 
too, but I suppose I'll have to give it to the 
bathing beauties instead." And Elsie shyly 
held up a long sleeved muslin nightgown. 

Papa tugged at his mustache. 

"Wouldn't it be a good lesson for you, 
too, dear Papa, to see Little Eva go to 
Heaven. Would it not bring home the fact 
that we are but mortals after all." 

She stopped trembling as her father 
turned sternly towards her. 

"I mean after we see the bathing beau- 
ties, then can we see Little Eva go to 
Heaven?" 

Jack Dalton Soliloquizes on Roy 
D'Arcy, Earle Foxe, Etc. 

{With interruptions by Our Nell) 

Jack Dalton has just, returned from a 
trip to the studios and is sprawled on 
a chair in his room, his feet on the table. 
His silk hat hangs from the gas pipe and 
he chuckles fiendishly. 

"Ah Ha-a-a-a ! And they call them vil- 
lains. Bah ! It ain't what it used to be. 
It makes a man ashamed. Not a saw- 
mill or a railroad track between them. 
They couldn't even get a shiver from a 
day-old kitten. They even wear knickers ! 
Milk-fed chickens ! It's getting so you 
can't tell 'em from the hero." He stopped 
short as someone knocked at the door. 

"Damnation. Can that be the sheriff? 



Come in!" He pulled a horse pistol from 
his hip pocket, smiling evilly. 

Our Nell entered, dressed in gingham 
and wearing an awfully sweet smile. 

"Ah, little lad)', come right into my 
parlor," said Jack Dalton with a leer. 

As Nell sat down sighing, he asked : 

"Well, Nell, what do you think of the 
villains running around in the studios ?" 

"Villains !" Nell came as close to sneer- 
ing as heroines can. "Do you call them 
villains ? I saw one of them today and I 
felt so sorry for the heroine, having a 
poor sap like that doing her dirt. Me, I 
like my villain strong. I thought of the 
breath-taking moment when you had me 
tied to the railroad track and I saw the 
train coming nearer, nearer. Ah, those 
were the good old days." 

"Do you mean it, little gal?" Jack asked. 

'Every word of it," Nell cried. 

"Then take this and this and this." He 
plunged a rubber dagger into her heart. 

"How good you are," Nell sighed. 

Anna Moore and Her Dad See How 
It Is Done in the Movies 

"""There you see, Father, throwing me 
out in a snow-drift and look at her. 
What does she get : a country house, a 
town car and a Paris flat, on the right 
bank, too !" Anna Moore turned re- 
proachfully to her father, who stood beside 
her, watching them take a scene in Greta 
Garbo's newest picture. 

"I know, daughter, but things was dif- 
ferent way down east." 

"You could have had my picture in the 
tabloids, and what did y' do? Just threw 
a goldmine in a snow-drift, that's all !" 

"Exploitation was different in them 
days, Gal." He bent his head in shame. 

"Yea, what did you give me. A shawl ! 
What about those ladies Greta Garbo's 
always doing, not to mention Lya de 
Putti's and Phyllis Haver's dames. They 
get fur coats, diamond bracelets and mil- 
lionaires, and me, the mammy of them all, 
gets a shawl and a snow-storm." 

"Will you ever forgive me, daughter?" 

"Yea, what's the use of keeping a grudge. 
But, Dad, I want you to promise me some- 
thing. If I ever get another chance, I want 
you to get me into the night school those 
gals went to." 



86 



The Answer Man 

{Continued from page 80) 

Nick Stuart can be reached at the Fox 
Studios, 1401 N. Western Avenue, Los 
Angeles, Cal. Nils Asther at the Metro- 
Goldwyn Studios, Culver City, Cal. Nils 
is playing in "Her Cardboard Lover." 
Betty Bronson is playing in "The Singing 
Fool," starring Al Jolson. Josephine Dunn 
also has a role in this picture. Bebe Dan- 
iels was born in Texas, January 14, 1901. 
Send your note to James Hall at the Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. Buddy Rogers is not engaged 
to anyone at this writing. 

WANTA NO— You do, well let 'er go. 
Charles Rogers was born August 13, 1904. 
Write him at the Paramount Studios, 5451 
Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. Rex Bell 
at the Fox Studios, 1401 N. Western Ave., 
Los Angeles, Cal. Douglas Fairbanks, 
Jr's., mother is Beth Sully. Doug is play- 
ing in "The Toilers," Jobyna Ralston is 
playing opposite. Both at the Tiffany- 
Stahl Productions, 933 N. Seward St., 
Hollywood, Cal. You bet you may write 
me again. 

MISS PEABODY— Gary Cooper and 
Fay Wray have the leads in "The First 
Kiss." What could be sweeter? You 
may write Evelyn Brent, Esther Ralston 
and Clara Bow at the Paramount Studios, 
5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. Sally 
O'Neil and Malcolm MacGregor have the 
leads in "The Girl on the Barge." Quite 
a few of the scenes were "shot" right here 
in New York. Send me your name and 
address for a list of the photos I can 
supply. 

LADY LOU— Richard Arlen is married 
to Jobyna Ralston. Gary Cooper was born 
in Helena, Montana, May 7, 1901. Gilbert 
Roland is single, his next picture is "A 
Woman Disputed," starring Norma Tal- 
madge. Charles Farrell, single, write him 
at the Fox Studios, 1401 N. Western Ave., 
Los Angeles, Cal. John Boles had the 
male lead in "The Bride of Colorado." 

LEN — Glad you like this column. I 
don't believe your employer would object 
to those few minutes. Yes, I thought 
"The Legion of the Condemned" was 
great. Your letters will reach Gary 
Coper, Richard Arlen and Clara Bow at 
the Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. Larry Kent, First Na- 
(Continued on page 97) 



Your Neighbor Says — 

(Continued from page 41) 

make you go home talkin to yo'self. I'll 
even take you up to the Montmartre for 
luncheon, and what I mean to say, you'll 
see plenty of movie stars there and you'll 
know them, too! ! This idea that the stars 
look differently on the street in real life 
than they do on the screen is the bunk — 
you'll recognize them right away. The 
beautiful ones will be just as beautiful and 
the homely ones just as homely. You'll 
like Hollywood — and you'll enjoy seeing 
what only Hollywood can show you — all 
the movie stars, their homes and cars, and 
the latest "husband" ! 

But you'll probably find (just as I did) 
— there is no happy medium in this town, 
you are either in or out. Hollywood is a 
place where dreams come true, beyond 
the fondest expectations of a few, and the 
dawn comes up in cold, grim reality for 
the rest. And — oh, Lord! How the sun 
does shine! 




"Now I know . . . ! " 

She did not know what was the matter . . . she was not ill 
. . . but something was wrong. The old energy was gone. Her 
married life seemed to have become a failure. Was it her 
fault? She asked a doctor to examine her. He told her what 
was wrong. 

Most fastidious women today practice sane habits of living 
and feminine hygiene to safeguard their health and vitality 
and youthfulness. But a great many actually injure them- 
selves by following unsound advice or using the wrong dis- 
infectant. In this vital matter you must have the facts. 

The makers of "Lysol" Disinfectant will send you free a 
booklet called "The Scientific Side of Health and Youth." 
It contains the rules for practicing feminine hygiene which 
every woman should know. Send the coupon now. 

But while waiting for the booklet to arrive, take no more 
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years, been the standard disinfectant with physicians and 
hospitals when germs must be killed. Buy a bottle of "Lysol" 
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Sally Phipps' beach playfellow has no regard for her perfectly good sunshade, but the 

pup smiles, so Sally smiles too 

The Second Christ Weighs Hollywood 

(Continued from page 49) 



who has no use for creeds and dogmas 
urges no dogma of his own. He has the 
lovely humility of the truly great. 

When I asked for an appointment, by 
telephone, it was granted immediately, 
within the hour of asking, without ques- 
tion. He did not know who I was nor 
what I wanted of him. That wouldn't 
matter. I was a human being desiring to 
see him. The petty pomps of little souls 
are not for him. 

No circumstance attends this youth who 
has been called the Second Christ. Such 
trifling poor pretensions are reserved for 
the make-believers of the world. 

He is very simple, this youth who had 
come to give us the message of Happi- 
ness. A happiness not dependent on the 
things the eye can see nor the things the 
hand can touch. And by being simple, he 
explained to me, he does not mean to be 
crude. But to be simple is the first end 
for which we all should strive. The com- 
plicated mind and the complicated heart 
serve only to distort the truth. 

Of the movies I said, "Have you ever 
seen a picture, or any part of a picture, 
that seemed to you to hold so much as a 
glimpse of the vision you hold?" 

And he was, at that one question, more 
emphatic than at any other time. "No," 
he said, and was agitated as a lake is agi- 
tated when a May breeze fingers it, 
"Please, no — no — no " 

"The King of Kings?" I prompted. . 

He said, "Something that is passed. 
That picture, it was not creative. You 
see — do you see, we have no power over 
the past. We have only the future " 

"But you do believe in the Screen? In 
its power? In its possibilities?" 

"Oh, yes — yes ! It has everything. It 
is limitless in its power, but — it has not 
used that power. It has everything 
but " 

He paused, distressed. In his innate 
charity for all things and for all men 
he hesitated to place an onus anywhere. 

"Everything," I said for him, "every- 
thing but the men of vision. The men 



who would give the world great dreams 
to dream and never count the cost." 

He said, a little sadly, "Yes — everything 
is pushed down — you see? Pushed down 

and down, to lower levels " and with 

his slender hands he made the gesture of 
pushing down, lowering, crushing to earth. 
And I had the vision of the producers of 
Hollywood crushing souls into rank un- 
dergrowth, stifling and smothering them. 

He told me that here we are in cages. 
We live our lives in cages and never get 
outside. And we spend our lives decorat- 
ing the bars. 

We believe that there is comfort in life. 
We seek for comfort of one sort or 
another. We pray God for it. And there 
is no comfort. There is no comfort be- 
cause life is a search. Because all so- 
called comfort is dependent on some other 
one, some other thing. And so forever 
transient. 

He said that the screen gives us a pool 
of water, muddied. It soon dries up, leav- 
ing no trace. What we are thirsting for 
is a lake with an illimitable source. 

The screen gives us little tales of little, 
momentary loves. Carnal loves. Men and 
women. Women and men. In cages. 
Loves that cannot matter. 

The Germans have shown us a bit of 
what the screen might do, but — they have 
shown us in the wrong direction. 

The screen is giving us but a small 
opening, an aperture, when we should be 
looking through its wide windows into 
the heavens. We should be because it 
would be possible. Because to the screen 
all things are possible. 

It would seem that there must arise men 
of power to replace the men in power 
now. Men who can say with Krishna- 
murti, "What have I done with all that 
knowledge, with all the labels, with all 
the phrases and all the jargons I have 
learned? In zvhat way have I created ? 
In what way have I given and brought 
joy to those people who suffer and are 
longing and desirous to learn, those people 
who are fumbling in the darkness?" 



Believers in Santa Claus 

(Continued from page 85) 

turous family as well as a large one. 
Particularly the men. Barbara was born 
in the Middle West, but she doesn't recog- 
nize that as home any more than the 
South East or the North West. Her 
father's love of travel kept the whole 
family pretty much on the go, and so when 
Barbara and her elder brother decided to 
come out to California for a winter, there 
was no objection from the family. 

Have You Heard This One? 

LJere is where the movies came into Bar- 
bara's life. Or, rather, she came into 
the movie life. It happened so ridiculously 
easily that no wonder she says "It's easy 
enough for any one to get started in the 
movies." 

Like every one else who comes to Holly- 
wood, Barbara met some people who took 
her and her brother through a movie stu- 
dio. She met a casting director. (My 
typewriter creaks as I write the old, fa- 
miliar phrases.) He asked her if she 
wanted to go in the movies. She said 
"No." But finally she consented to a 
test. A contract with Universal followed 
soon after that. The same old story. 

For a couple of months she struggled 
along with "bits" and extra work in com- 
pany with Janet Gaynor, Marceline Day 
and Virginia Bradford. Then they pro- 
moted her to leads opposite Hoot Gibson 
and a couple of the other boys — and in 
time, with Reginald Denny, their piece de 
resistance. Now she's out after the bigger 
and better things. And how ! 

Well, it's wonderful. It's simply amaz- 
ing. 

Corinne Griffith has grown languid with 
glory. Even Jack Gilbert has lost the 
keen edges of his enthusiasm. 

But with Barbara it may be different ! 




Taylor-made — not Ruth's rompers, but her 

sling-shot. She whittled it with a knife bought 

with her own money 



Helena Rubinstein's 

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No-one Calls Me 

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WHAT a constant tor- 
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Marion Templeton, who could easily be mistaken for Lois Moran, plays her 
first important screen role in Norma Talmadge's "The Woman Disputed" 



Hidden Wives 

(Continued from page 69) 



reserved compatriot, will amiably include 
his wife, son and daughter in photographs 
and interviews, when requested. And 
Ronald Colman, most reticent of the Brit- 
ishers among us, says frankly, "I wish, 
in every interview you use on me, you 
would state that I am married. I don't 
understand why so many people believe I 
am a bachelor. I'm not, and I don't want 
to pose as one." 

An amusing situation arises occasion- 
ally, when a well-established actor decides, 
right out of a clear sky, to soft-pedal his 
family life. Probably the whole world 
knows what his wife looks like, how many 
children he has and how many teeth the 
children have, but suddenly the astonished 
interviewer finds that a ban has been 
placed on all photographs of him sur- 
rounded by the little woman ct al. 

He will pose with his dogs, his books, 
his piano or anybody's rose-bush, but he'll 
pose alone. The family is out. He ac- 
tually hopes, thereby, to create the im- 
pression that here is a lone and eligible 
bachelor. But the fans, already familiar 
with his domestic affairs, can't be fooled, 
and Hollywood jeeringly awaits the 
pseudo-bachelor's inevitable return to the 
family group. 

It is because of the fruitless endeavor 
of these men to pose as bachelors, that the 
newcomers, just rising to stardom, strive 
manfully to hide the wife and family from 
the hour that popularity dawns upon them. 

It would appear that this problem trou- 
bles the romantic actor only. Comedians 
and character actors are, with the excep- 
tion of Lon Chaney, quite willing to per- 
mit their families to bask in the limelight 
with them. In fact, the wives of these 



men are frequently asked to pose for "gag" 
pictures with their celebrated husbands. 
Thus we may have Mrs. Ray Hatton play- 
ing leap-frog, and Mrs. George Bancroft 
frolicking among the cactus. Anything for 
a laugh. Harold Lloyd readily poses with 
Mildred and Gloria, Tom Mix with 
Vickey and Thomasina, Emil Jannings 
with his Gussie. But perhaps the girls 
don't write love-letters to these men, as 
they do to the swell collar hero, who 
strives for a Valentino fame. 

And, mentioning Valentino, we must 
admit that marriage appeared to hamper 
his career. I happen to know that photo- 
graphs of Rudy with Natacha were most 
unpopular . among the film fans. Thou- 
sands of angered, protesting letters were 
written to Rudy whenever a lay-out of 
pictures that included his wife graced a 
magazine page. I doubt that a single 
movie fan, today, treasures a picture in 
which Natacha appears at Rudy's side. 
The public wanted him — alone — though 
Rudy was eager to have his wife share 
his fame. 

Like Rudy, a few other popular stars 
are frank about their marital status. 
Outstanding examples are Rod La Rocque, 
Jack Mulhall, Dick Arlen, Milton Sills 
and the lately married Adolphe Men- 
jou. They will pose with their wives any 
day of the week, without worrying 
whether it will affect their fan mail ad- 
versely. 

If it just breaks your heart to see pic- 
tures of these men with their wives, cheer 
up. There are a few bachelors left in the 
film colony, and I am inclined to believe 
that they are jolly well pleased to remain 
bachelors, because the fans like them that 
way. 



90 



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^Iwice the Beauty Jrom Faee'Powder if 

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So many powders are described as impalpable, or 

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She'd crack the glass from inside 



She's the Kind of Girl Men Don't Forget 

{Continued from page 59) 



where in Virginia. It doesn't matter 
where. 

Her father, a Cornell man, sold fish 
and clams, or something crustacean. 
Wholesale, of course. He was, and is, 
comfortably well off. There were two 
other sisters and a young brother. There 
still are. 

Duncan pere was parentally conserva- 
tive and put his foot down, so to speak, 
on the small, unusual daughter who, at an 
early age, took to posturing before mirrors 
and reciting pieces in loud, declamatory 
accents. He shouted at her to be silent- 
for-Heaven's-sake, after the fashion of all 
good authentic fathers. 

She says she was a very cunning child. 

Later on, after the two elder sisters were 
decently educated and "finished" and as 
decently married, father Duncan sent the 
young Mary to Cornell. 

She had been a brilliant high school pupil 
with A's on her report cards. And her 
father wanted her to be a lawyer. He felt 
that he could visualize her perfectly, a pas- 
sionate Portia, a keen, judicial manner, a 
black ribbon attached to a monocle depend- 
ing elegantly from her legal brow. Mary 
felt there might be something to it. She 
knew that she craved an audience. Ha- 
ranguing twelve 'good men and true — well, 
yes — but there were wider fields to con- 
quer. There was the stage. 

The Cure That Didn't 

P N route to Cornell she stopped off in 
Washington. Some senator, a friend 
of her father's, took her to her first 
theater. He did so at her father's behest, 
in order to show her why the theater was 
not for a nice girl like her. He picked 
"The Gold Diggers," that moral lesson, 



sugar-coated, wherein the ladies of the 
footlights subsist by a knowledge of what 
gentlemen prefer. It didn't take. The in- 
stant Mary Duncan beheld Ina Claire 
emoting before her she was seized with 
a violent fever to be doing the same herself. 
Her mind was made up. And it is no 
mean mind. 

But she went to Cornell and got mixed 
up in the dramatic societies and acquired 
some poor marks. During the year and a 
half of her educative process the red seeds 
of Thespis bloomed and put forth shoots. 
She pleaded with her father for dramatic 
schools. He was adamant. No nice girl 
goes on the stage. 

At the end of the year and a half the 
vivid, eighteen year old Mary did a dis- 
appearing act. She vanished into the fold 
of Yvette Guilbert's School. She sent mail 
for her family to her sorority sisters at 
Cornell who, wrestling with devils, for- 
warded it for her. They mailed her her 
letters in turn. This went on for some 
months and then father found out ! 

There was a simoon. A cataclysm. An 
eruption. 

Father hired a lawyer to enforce the 
parental dictums. Mary, subsisting on 
a meagre allowance from a grandmother's 
estate, hired a lawyer, too. On her own. 
It was, she says, the heedless daring of 
youth. The sublimely unthinking courage. 
The things she did then she would not 
dare to do now. 

Some technicality having to do with a 
daughter's right to study what she will so 
long as she has means of maintenance saved 
the day for Mary and Mary for the stage. 
There may be a design in such things. 
Mary conquered, be that as it may, she 
didn't see her father again for two years. 
{Continued on page 94) 



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She's the Kind of Girl Men Don't Forget 

(Continued from page 93) 

jade, Broadway, by her performance in 
"The Shanghai Gesture." 

The movies sidled up again, offering 
largesse. And the moral of this tale is 
that Mary is now signed with Fox and, 
at this writing, is completing "The Four 
Devils" under the extraordinary direction 
of Murnau, the outstanding individual of 
the Hollywood megaphone. Mary plays a 
Bad Woman in "The Four Devils," and if 
she doesn't tweak the nerves of brain cells 
and emotional reflexes, then you haven't 
any, that's all. 



Not a Ten O'Clock Type 

Che lived four flights up in a cheap 
boarding house. She ate now and then. 
Then she joined the Three Arts Club and 
lived there except for the three periods 
when she was expelled from that austere 
hostelry. For refusing to check in at ten 
o'clock. For overflowing the bathtub. For 
burning the midnight kilowatts, after 
hours. And other and sundry rebellions. 
Mary was not made for the laws spawned 
of men. 

She won the Yvette Guilbert prize for 
the most talented girl m the troupe. 
Yvette wanted her to go abroad and study 
voice for light opera. Mary still hankered 
for the broader swathe of the drama. 

Leo Ditrichstein, that finished artist of 
yesterday, a graduate of the Viennese 
school, took her in hand. She had had the 
French point of view. She was now being 
dipped in the decadent dyes of Vienna. He 
trained her carefully, giving her all he 
had. She played with him in "Toto" and 
one other play, I think. The critics haw- 
hawed. They said that the casting was 
absurd, that no girl of Mary's age could 
fall in love with a man of Ditrichstein's 
age, on the stage or off. It was absurd. 
That shaft pierced the egotistic armor and 
the Duncan-Ditrichstein duo was off. 

There were lots of experiences between 
the Then and the Now. Stock. A play or 
two in London. One or two in Paris. 
Others in New York. A trip to San Fran- 
cisco and one to Hollywood, for the pur- 
poses of sightseeing. A movie offer. Mary 
looked down upon the movies in those days. 
An artist didn't bother with the flickers. 

And then, evidently, the dent on the old 



French Immorality Best 

|\/Jary lives, with her sister, in a con- 
ventionally attractive bungalow in 
Beverly Hills. She may go abroad at the 
completion of the picture. For stimulus. 
Paris stimulates her. The French, she 
says, are the only people in the world 
who know how to be immoral with finesse. 
In America we wallow, splatter mud and 
shout "See! See!" 

She believes in a short life and a full 
one. Marriage is an excellent institution, 
but not for her. Not yet. Men are too 
jealous. They always want to know where 
you are and what you are doing and why. 
That's penal servitude. Love? Yes, she's 
been in love. Off and on. With reserva- 
tions. When the reservations break? But 
that, my children, is another story. Not 
mine. 

In the meantime, here she is. A woman 
for women to fear and men to remember. 

If it makes you feel any better, her 
father has forgiven her. He is proud e£ 
her and she thinks he's swell. 



94 



Keeping Baby Single 

{Continued from page 33) 

nothing at all. The kind of marriage 
rooted in the twin soils of love and respect. 
The kind of love that brings forth young, 
creates a home, labors, and is patient and 
long standing. 

The girls of today, Ben says, would 
laugh at pressed flowers, at lacy valentines, 
at fellows who come to call and depart 
at ten-thirty. 

Just as they have stripped the glamour- 
ous laces and ruffles from their young 
bodies, so have they stripped the lovely 
lace of mystery from love. Love, today, 
is sex, and a good time and the sky the 
limit — who cares ? Well, who does ? Cer- 
tainly not the young men who may have 
for a victrola record what formerly they 
could have only by the blood of devotion. 

Davenport Damsels 

'he girls of today come to call on a 
fellow whenever the spirit moves them. 
Far be it from them to wait for a fellow 
to call on them. And if one fellow is 
out, well, they have their address books 
and good memories, haven't they ? Ben has 
frequently come home to his Hollywood 
apartment and has found five or six damsels 
draped on his davenport consuming his re- 
freshments, liquid and otherwise. 

These little-more-than-children do not 
hesitate to neck — and then some. The old 
days of waiting to kiss a chap until you 
are engaged to him — imagine your em- 
barrassment if you could hear them razz 
that antiquated thought ! 

It makes for fun and gaiety, of course. 
When you are in the mood. There are 
loments in Ben's life when the sky being 
the limit is dimensionally amusing. But 
it makes for something else, too. It makes 
for Ben saying that he is afraid to marry. 
"•"or some of these girls wear, or should 
/ear, the sacred golden circlet on their 
loose young fingers. 

It makes Ben know that to respect the 
woman you marry comes before love in 
the order of importance. You have to 
je able to trust the partner of your joys 
md sorrows. 

And it is Ben's belief that Companion- 
ate Marriage will only serve to emphasize 
this state of affairs. 

"I think" he said, "that hundreds of 
young couples, sincerely in love and in 
earnest, often feel that they will chuck 
the whole business and go back to Mother. 
Especially during the first few years. 
Some trifling disagreement, lack of money, 
jpset stomach — anything that irritates 
them, makes them feel that they would like 
to end it then and there — if they could. 
\s marriage stands now, most of them 
can't very well. It usually involves con- 
siderable expense, probable alimony, a cer- 
tain stigma of unpleasantness and cheating 
the Law. They decide that it's all too 
complicated, and after all, they're in, and 
'iell, they might as well stick. They do 
stick— and they stick very well, very sub- 
stantially and for the most part, pretty 
happily. Lots of fine marriages would go 
Dn the rocks during the early years if they 
could split on the easy basis of the Com- 
panionate. 

Bootlegging Sex 

"(Companionate marriage is bootlegging 
sex. And there is enough of that 
done without giving it the shadowy sanc- 
tion of the law. 

"I believe that the pendulum will swing 
the other way before long. It's bound to. 
But if Companionate Marriage is common- 




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Ladies, be seated! An all-star basketball team composed of Alice White, Yola D'Avril, 
Frances Hamilton, Thelma Todd and Rozella Williams, as they appear in the court costumes 



ly accepted, there will be no need for it to 
swing. Consciences won't hurt any longer 
and the loosened bond will loosen to the 
point of unpreventable laxity. 

"There's too much freedom now. The 
younger generation has its own way about 
everything. Why say to them, 'Here, we 
know you can't go through with any bind- 
ing, sacred contract, so we will give you 
little darlings Companionate Marriage and 
make it all nice and easy for you.' 

"Every girl and boy should do a certain 
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arrive at the type of person they would 
like to marry. 

"I've had quite a bit of it, and I've been 
credited with quite a bit I haven't had. I've 
been card-indexed with Barbara La Marr, 
Gloria Swanson, Pola Negri, Anna Q. 
Nilsson, Ruth Elder and goodness knows 
who-all. Some of it has been so. Some 
hasn't. And there has been Marilyn, of 
course. 

"I found in Barbara a generosity of heart 
that was a real and lasting lesson to me. 
Her heart was greater than her caution 
or her common sense. She gave until it 
hurt and that not being enough, she gave 
until she died. Barbara is best expressed in 
the one word — generosity. 

Glorifying Gloria 

f admired Gloria. Just as my reaction 
to Barbara is generosity, so my reaction 
to Gloria is admiration. She can do so 
many things. Play and sing and dance 
and talk profoundly and invent things. She 
is sophisticated and groomed, mentally and 
physically. She is surrounded by bad ad- 
visers. If she were not, she would be 
easily the leading personality in pictures 
today. 

"I get from Ruth Elder the feeling of 
gallantry. She is adventurous and spirited, 
and fine and free. 

"Marilyn — well, Marilyn has been and 
probably always will be the great love of 
my life. It was a marvelous companion- 
ship. It still is. We are not engaged to 
be married any longer. Separated as we 



are by reason of our work, neither one of 
us could appear, however casually, with 
some other man or woman but that the 
press would announce it and give it a 
significance it didn't have. That humili- 
ated Marilyn and humiliated me. We have 
decided to remain friends and see each 
other whenever there is an opportunity. 
But all ideas of marriage are over. 

"Marilyn, to me, is like a flower. Fra- 
grant and sweet. It is a sentimental sim- 
ile, but it is Marilyn to me. She is the 
freshest, loveliest thing I have ever known. 
I've never seen her walk into a night club 
or a cafe but that the whole place seemed 
to lighten and glow with a newer, brighter 
life. She quickened it, somehow." 

Long-Distance Love 

It was a little saddening, this talk of 
Ben and Marilyn. I had been in his apart- 
ment so many times when he had called. 
Or she had called him. Two young things 
burning gold at the altar of love. And 
when Ben came back from those long- 
distance love-talks, his face bore no trace 
of the I-am-afraid-to-marry talk of this 
latter day. Truth compels me to confuse 
you by saying that he even called her that 
very day — and when he came back into the 
room — oh, but figure it out for your- 
self—! 

"I don't know," he said, finally, "This 
sex business is pretty complicated. But I 
do know that I shall not marry for some 
years to come. I'm disappointed about it, 
too. I always dreamed of marrying very 
young, of having my son grow up with me. 
But I'm afraid. If girls would only realize 
that they are destroying the very charm of 
living and of loving. There are only 
one or two girls I know for whom I can 
feel that lovely mystery and charm. Marian 
Nixon is one of them. I have never heard 
and never felt one unpleasant thing in her 
presence. And I don't mean that girls have 
to be vestal virgins. Frankly, I'd prefer 
them not to be. I like experience. I like 
the quality commonly called 'It.' And I 
like character, too. Try to find it !" 



The Answer Man 

(Continued from page 87) 

tional Studios, Burbank, Cal. Barry Nor- 
ton, Fox Studios, 1401 N. Western Ave., 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

FLORETTE— A parking place is the 
space in which another car is parked. 
Dorothy Mackaill hails from England, 
she's twenty-five, her next picture will be 
"The Barker," at the First National Stu- 
dios, Burbank, Cal. Kathleen Clifford who 
retired from the screen to open a flower 
shop has decided to return, and you will 
next see her in "Excess Baggage," starring 
William Haines. 

MARY G. D.— Are you Scotch? A 
bagpipe is a reed instrument of great an- 
tiquity, in which the reeds are supplied 
with air directly from a bag under the 
player's arm. It is used chiefly in Scot- 
land, Ireland and Italy. Rin-Tin-Tin is 
about nine years old ; write his owner and 
trainer, Lee Duncan, at the Warner Bros. 
Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
Cal. Walter Pidgeon, Tiffany-Stahl 
Productions, 933 N. Seward St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

DOROTHY BYRD— You forgot your 
address. William Boyd, born 1898, write 
Bill at the De Mille Studios, Culver City, 
Cal. Richard Arlen, twenty-nine. His 
next will be "Beggars of Life," Paramount 
Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. Douglas Fairbanks, May 23, 1883. 
His new picture has not been titled. Rod 
La Rocque has been married to Vilma 
Banky since June 26, 1927. He is playing 
in "Love Over Night." 

BLUE— Who wouldn't be? Ronald has 
only been married once, has no children. 
Pola Negri's latest is "The Lady From 
Moscow." The Motion Picture Maga- 
zine has already published the life story 
of John Gilbert; it appeared in the May, 
(Continued on page 104) 





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It is inspiring, indeed, in this world of shifting devotions, to find a friendship truly 

lasting. But here is one between Buster Collier and his doglet — that is actually 

puppetual. The dog's name is Curtis; and, like his master, he is unmarried 



The Wife -Market 

(Continued from page 42) 



Massachusetts sister wails "Why do you 
insist upon her having brown eyes ; don't 
you like blue eyes just the same?" 

Another subtly questions "Why, oh why, 
in your ideal of the Perfect One did you 
omit a sense of humor? It is much more 
essential than brown eyes !" 

They're All Seagoing 

A writer from New York admits that she 
^^ was disappointed to hear that Buster 
preferred blondes, and b^gs him to change 
his mind because brunettes make better 
wives — even offering to prove it. 

"I've brown eyes and hair, but not 
blonde. I hope it don't make any dif- 
ference to you. I'm a jolly good fel- 
low and think you would like that. 
Well, Buster, you couldn't like boats 
the way I do and for a hostess I'm 
right there. I'll have to bring my 
little note to a close in hopes of getting 
an answer from the one I admire." 

And a damsel from Oregon wants to 
know why eyes matter. "What difference 
would it make if the eyes weren't brown 
if they hold oceans of love for you? I 
think I am your ideal, but how can I 
prove it to you?" Another maiden who 
admits she is ideal adds : "You also said 
you would like to have a child or two ; 
I think I can help you there." 

The average age of the seekers-after- 
happiness seems to be eighteen, but there 
is among the applicants one who signs her- 
self "Patiently, Aunt Em!" 

"I'm out on the bride subject, as am 
thirty-seven, cat-eyed and a widow, 



grass ! But wouldn't I just love to 
sail the unknown seas with you ; also 
go camping — what's that Omar said 
about A glass of wine and thou' (only 
I prefer lemonade). Just give me a 
bathing suit, bandanna and pair of 
worn tennis shoes and we will be on 
our way. Everyone loves to go camp- 
ing with Aunt Em (because she does 
most of the cooking)." 

"Find Her Yourself, Buster" 

#*"Vnictsm is not absent from the corres- 
pondents. Annette thinks that only one 
girl in a million really likes boats, no 
matter what she may say and hints darkly 
that a wife may have a few moods of 
her own. A fair Canadian observes that 
it's up to Buster to make the girl happy 
and not expect it all to be one-sided. 
Doris remarks, succinctly : "Get out and 
find her yourself. I am also looking for 
my mate, but I'm keeping my eyes open, 
so when I get my man I can grab all the 
credit to myself." 

Several damsels are not surprised that 
the Perfect Mate is not to be found in 
Hollywood, where "young ladies are too 
self-centered to submerge their personali- 
ties in a husband" ; and one citizeness of 
Washington, D. C, demands : 

"Just what have you o offer to your 
Ideal Wife in return for her perfec- 
tion? Money? Money .lever took the 
place of love! Prestige? One tires 
of 'keeping up with the Joneses.' I 
wouldn't marry a movie actor for a 
million dollars ! You movie actors 
have reached the point where your 



98 



whole world is composed of a six- 
letter word 'Myself'." 

But right in the same mail with that hot 
shot comes this balm for the wounded 
spirit: 

"I like you very much. It isn't love 
at first sight, it's two years I liked 
you. I am not very pretty, but fair. 
There's one thing I could tell you, I 
could make a good home for you. I 
am not jealous. I am not like some 
girls that like dances or go to hotels. 
If you have one girl already, just say 
so." 

Another longing lassie admits that she 
is not his ideal, but she has always liked 
his pictures. She's not writing because she 
wants him "or anything of that sort," but 
she thinks he is wonderful to be so care- 
ful in choosing a mate. She doesn't smoke 
or drink or go on wild parties, and she is 
glad to hear that some movie stars are 
decent. If she were his ideal, "what I 
mean, a blonde," she wouldn't be writing! 

Ready to Be Worshiped 

"VY/hile a righteous young person from 
Texas says : 

"I could answer everything you have 
said to your approval if given the 
chance. I don't smoke or drink, and 
petting is disgusting and degrading to 
me. I am not a Wallflower or Flat 
Tire as you no doubt think. Whoever 
said girls can't get dates if they don't 
pet is just crazy. I am stating facts. 
Boys are only too proud to put you on 
a pedestal because they feel they have 
a prize, as so darn few real girls are 
living. ..." 

Lucy states that her eyes are hazel with 
brown specks, and asks wistfully if twenty 
is too old for him. Mary Ann from Min- 
nesota boasts that she can take a Ford 
to pieces and put it together again in a 
day and a half (presumably, because Buster 
admitted that he enjoyed tinkering with 
his car). And a little undergraduate nurse 
confides that she doesn't like society very 
much because she's never been in it. 

But the young man may have an op- 
portunity to choose at first-hand, for sev- 
eral of the maidens announce joyfully their 
arrival in the Golden State in the near 
future. One from the Middle West says 
she will be visiting friends in Los Angeles 
shortly, adding the intriguing information 
that there will be "no interfering with in- 
laws on my side as my mother and little 
brother are all I have and they want me 
to have the best in life." 

Letters come from Merrie England and 
Bonny Scotland and other distant lands. 
One fair Britisher wants to know if she 
should send a picture or come out to the 
U. S. to see him. And Pauline mourns 
that she spent her money on a roadster be- 
fore she read the ad, so her trip to Cali- 
fornia is "all in the tires !" 

Then there's the collection of eager 
friends who know just the girl. One from 
Florida, enclosing a newspaper picture of 
the fair one and a set of clippings about 
her, while a "Motion Picture Reader" from 
Louisville, recites the virtues of her best 
pal. "If you have intentions of wearing 
the ball and chain, won't you please let 
me send a photo of my sister?" pleads 
another. 

But, best of all, comes word from a 
fellow-male: 

"All right, Buster— One !— Two !— 
Three ! The race is on — you and me 
— and we're both looking for the same 
(Continued on page 102) 



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When Colleen Moore and her brother, Cleve, were children, they always played together, 

so Colleen fixed it so that they could play together in pictures, too. This is Cleve Moore 

as Captain Russell in one of her recent pictures, "Lilac Time" 

In and Out of Focus 



(Continued ft 

Scotching the Idea 

"LJE was a Scotch actor. "Now you 

■*■■*■ go on, Douglas," the director told 
him, "you listen to what she has to say, 
and then you reach into your pocket 
and take out your wallet and give 

her a hundred-dollar bill " "Wait 

a minute" interrupted the Scotchman, 
"somebodj'- — send for my double!" 

Propriety Notes 

TSJORMA TALMADGE has gone on 
■*■ * her vacation to Honolulu. Gilbert 
Roland has gone on his vacation to 
Honolulu. But the newspapers hasten 
to reassure, us. "James Cooley, uncle 
of Miss Talmadge," they explain, "is 
in the party. Mr. Cooley will share a 
stateroom with Mr. Roland." "Joseph 
Schenck, the husband of Miss Tal- 
madge was not at the dock to see them 
off," one local reporter adds consci- 
entiously, "at the studio it was said 
that he was in New York." 

A Hackathorne in their Lives? 

/~*EORGE HACKATHORNE claims 

^-* to be so psychic. He can read 
your thoughts, he tells you, before you 
know them yourself. At a party the 
other night he went about telling 
people about their souls. And every 
now and then he would interrupt liim- 
self to ask earnestly, "I'm not hurting 



om page 39) 

your feelings, am I?" Ain't it wonder- 
ful- to be psychic? 

Perhaps a Widow 

"IJOTEL IMPERIAL" has just 
-*■-*- been playing on the stage in 
Hollywood. Boris Karloff, the film 
character man, was the villain who 
threw the lovely lady down and pulled 
her clothes off. "So this is the bad 
mans who tears off lady's clothes," 
said a coy young newspaper lady to 
him, "and such clothes. And such a 
lady!" Boris nodded gloomily. "Yes," 
he sighed. "Wasn't she zvecdy?" People 
don't appreciate their privileges. 

Selling Sue 

QUE CAROL'S salary is the subject 
^ of conversation in Hollywood 
these days. Douglas MacLean, who 
holds her contract, is said to be paying 
her less than three hundred a week, 
with a maximum of five hundred 
weekly during- the next five years! 
Meanwhile, he is renting Sue out for- 
it is said — seven-hundred-and-fifty a 
week with the probability that he can 
soon get even more for her. Sue has 
offered to buy her contract from him 
for twenty-five thousand dollars, but 
it is said the canny Douglas wants a 
hundred-and-fifty thousand for his 
1928 model flapper. 






100 



down the river for such a sum, she 
may leave the films flat and go back 
to being a society bud. 

The Birgen's Brilliants 

XLTERE is another story by Lupe 
■*■*■ Velez. The tale of the Birgen's 
Jewels — Lupe's new fledged English 
not being capable of the letter "V" as 
yet. "When I was in Mexico City we 
was ver' poor and I couldn' get a new 
dress to go to a ball. I theenk an' 
theenk, 'Lupe, how you goin' get that 
dress?' then I see the Birgen's di'- 
monds. My grandmother got a figure 
of a Birgen and her dress is all cov- 
ered wiz di'monds — what you say? 
Brilliants, yas ! So I steal them di'- 
monds off the Birgen's dress and sew 
them, on my old dress and go to the 
ball. I look ver' nize. But the next 
day my grandmother go to pray and 
she scream, 'Oh, somebody has stole 
the Birgen's di'monds!' Everybody 
hunt an' hunt, but they never find 
them di'monds. That was tree year 
ago. And last week when I was look- 
ing at my old dresses, I said to my 
grandmother, 'Say, do you remember 
about them di'monds that was stole off 
the Birgen in Mexico City?' and she 
says ver' solemn, 'Yes, and may God 
confound whoever took them!' an' I 
says, 'Wal, I hope He don't, because 
it was me.' " 

Neither Did Woodrow 

TOCAL HOLLYWOOD citizen to 
■*-"' guest whom he is showing the 
town, "And this, Auntie, is the Wood- 
row Wilson Junior High School." 
Auntie, blushing at her ignorance, "Do 



you know, George, I never even knew 
there was a Woodrow Wilson, 
Junior!" 

The Dark Flower 

"LJOLLYWOOD is still chuckling 
■*■■*■ over the epic hoax perpetrated on 
Carl Van Vechten, the author of "Nig- 
ger Heaven," when he was out here. 
It is known that Carl has a deep in- 
terest in cullud pussons, so Charlie 
Chaplin and othej" wits decided to give 
him a thrill. They gave the distin- 
guished author a dinner party and in- 
troduced him to the dark Madeline 
Hurlock, as one "Pansy Clemens," a 
mulatto. "Pansy" was so fascinating 
that Carl is said to have gone home 
and written a story about his amazing 
discovery and sent it to a magazine in 
the East, before he found out that he 
had been made the butt of a practical 
joke. Then he left Hollywood — they 
say — by the next train. 

Minimizing Molly 

TV/TOLLY O'DAY has gone to a 
■*-"-*■ famous hot springs back east to 
reduce. No more, pictures — so First 
National told her — 'till there was at 
least twenty pounds less of her. Her 
contract sets her weight limit at one 
hundred and eight. And Molly was at 
least thirty pounds over the limit. 

Patsy the Pat 

THE hot springs, by the way, are in 
Indiana. But that's "back east" 
from Hollywood. "My dear, I had a 
gorgeous time back in the States," I 

(Continued on page 103) 




Shearer delight : Norma was entranced — after playing in "The Student Prince'' 
by her visit to the real Heidelberg. And so was Heidelberg 




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exposed and 
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101 






mmmmmam^^m 




Nelson's work ( 1 ) be- 
fore and (2) after Federal 
School training. 

Now he DRAW$ 

the things he Wants 

LOOK at drawing No. 1 above. 
Then compare it with No. 2 and 
note the improvement Federal School 
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Nelson. He formerly worked as a 
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Today as an illustrator he makes 
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of Illustrating 



FEDERAL SCHOOL OF ILLUSTRATING, 
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Name 

Occupation 
Address 

102 



Age.. 




Frankie Darro and his pinto pony stopped their private wild West show, which they were 
putting on for some friends, long enough to pose for this picture 



The Wife -Market 

(Continued from page 99) 



angel. I roam the Southeast while 
you search the Garden Spot. We're 
both the same age and have the same 
chances to locate. SO IF I find her, 
and she has a twin sister, I know 
where you abide !" 

They Say He's Conceited 

This seemed encouraging until some girl 
from staid New England ended a long 
epistle with the cryptic warning : 

"Believe me, if you married a girl 
such as you depict this dream girl, 
your life would be about as varied, ex- 
citing, and interesting as a church." 
And Mona sadly observes : 

"You certainly are conceited. I'm 
sorry because I used to love to watch 
you kneel on one knee and look up 
into your mother's face — I'd cry and 
cry, but I won't any more because I 
hate you." 

Jennie from Chicago, "the bombing play- 
ground," reminds Buster grimly that this 
is leap year. A despairing little Mildred 
sighs that "in this day and age it is very 
difficult to find a real companionable pal. 
During my nineteen years of life I have 
been looking for such, but have given up 
hopes of his coming my way." 

Thoughtfully pasting a tiny snapshot of 
herself at the head of the letter, Stephanie 
writes : 



"Well, Buster, I want you to know 
that Hollywood was always ,on my 
mind for the last few years. Not to 
be an actress, but I always prayed and 
wished I could be an actor's wife. 
So make up your mind, for in me a 
faithful wife you'll find. You're just 
the kind of man I admire, and you 
can have me when you desire." 

Someone who signs herself "Justa never 
mind what" winds up a poetic effusion with 
"And so, quaint soul, as you go seeking, 
you take with you the good wishes of just 
such another wanderer, for I am 'the 
cat that walks by itself in the wet, wild 
wood, waving its wet, wild tail, all by its 
wet, wild lone.' " 

And every mail brings more. 

Buster reads every missive personally. 

"I was always convinced that it pays 
to advertise, but I never knew how well," 
he sighed mournfully from amid the sea 
of rose and purple and green and gray 
and orange pages. 

The telephone rang. He regarded it 
fearfully. "I'll bet that's another," he 
muttered. 

Footsteps sounded on the Spanish tile 
steps outside. The haunted young actor 
peered out of the window and descried a 
Western Union messenger. 

Silently he cat-footed out of the room 
and disappeared down the service stairs. 



In and Out of Focus 

(Continued from page 101) 

heard Patsy Ruth Miller telling a 
friend the other day. 

Sic Transit Gloria Negri 

POLA has departed — for a vacation, 
she says, and to see her husband's 
cousin married to a cousin of the King 
of Spain. But her dressing-room at 
the Famous Players studio, that dress- 
ing-room which rang to the sound of 
Charlie Chaplin's 'phone calls, and 
was filled with Rod La Rocque's 
flowers and Rudie's photographs, will 
know this temperamental artiste no 
more. The day after Pola had taken 
her last scenes for Famous, carpenters 
appeared and began tearing it down — 
much to her indignation. 



POOR 
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she has 



Joan Crawford 111 

Joan Crawford is a victim of 



For weeks, her friends say, 
been living on hard-boiled 
eggs and tomatoes, and as a result, was 
taken to the hospital last week to be 
operated on for stomach ulcers. 

Auld Langdon Syne 

T RAN across a photograph the 
■*■ other day — an old photograph taken 
twenty-five years ago. It showed two 
young people, a pretty girl, and a 
serious-faced man of some twenty-six 
or seven, and was inscribed "Affection- 
ately, the Langdons." Harry Lang- 
don and his wife worked together in 
vaudeville, struggled together, hoped 
together — and after twenty-five years, 
when success had come, Mrs. Langdon 
related in court the other day, through 
sobs, Harry told her, "I have other in- 
terests now." "I tried to hold him," 
she said pitifully, "but I couldn't." So 
the court freed them. And that's Hol- 
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The Answer Man 

(Continued from page 97) 



1925, issue. Write our circulation depart- 
ment in regard to securing a copy. Ed- 
mund Lowe at the Fox Studios, 1401 N. 
Western Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 

FORGET-ME-NOT — How could I. 
Lionel and John Barrymore are brothers. 
Joan Crawford, Clara Bow are still single. 
Mae Murray has blue eyes. Not playing 
in pictures now. Alice White's next pic- 
ture will be "Show Girl." She would like 
a note, written on that pretty blue station- 
ery, send it to the First National Studios, 
Burbank, Cal. Yes, they say curiosity 
killed the cat. But satisfaction brought it 
back. 

BABS— Dolores del Rio, Roland Drew, 
Norma Talmadge and Gilbert Roland are 
at the United Artists Studios, 1041 N. 
Formosa Ave., Hollywood, Cal. Bebe 
Daniels, James Hall, Paramount Studios, 
5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. You 
certainly have a lot of favorites. 

M. E. T.— Who? Greta Garbo was 
born in Stockholm, Sweden, about twenty- 
three years ago; five feet seven, weighs 
123 pounds, light hair, blue eyes. She's 
not engaged to any one at this writing. 
Philippe De Lacey is ten years old. Cul- 
len Landis, July 29, 1895, playing in "The 
Midnight Adventure," for Rayart Pro- 
ductions, Hollywood, Cal. Colleen Moore, 
August 8, 1902, "Oh, Kay," will be her 
next feature. 

MERELY MARY— Betty Bronson was 
born in Trenton, N. J., November 17, 1906. 
Betty has a role in Al Jolson's new picture, 
"The Singing Fool." Gilbert Roland is 
twenty-four, not married, playing in "A 
Woman Disputed." Edna Murphy is mar- 
ried to Mervyn Le Roy, playing opposite 
Cullen Landis in "The Midnight Adven- 
ture" for Rayart Productions, Hollywood, 



Cal. We have two Merely Mary's this 
time. But the more the merrier. 

JOAN CRAWFORD— Joan was born in 
Texas, twenty-two years ago. She's five 
feet four, weighs 105 pounds, red-brown 
hair, blue eyes. She danced in "The 
Passing Show" and Winter Garden before 
entering pictures. Mary Pickford was 
born April 8, 1893. Alice White is eigh- 
teen years old. I would suggest you write 
those studios again in regard to the 
money you sent for photos. Pola Negri's 
latest picture is "The Lady from Moscow." 
Norman Kerry is her leading man. Write 
Louise Brooks at the Paramount Studios, 
5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

RICHARD DIX FAN— Charles Rog- 
ers and Ivy Harris had the leads in "Fas- 
cinating Youth" ; practically all the Para- 
mount School played in this. Jewell Car- 
men was the girl in "The Bat." Where 
there's smoke there's a grand opera singer. 
Ivan Mosjukine is playing in "The Loves 
of Casanova," a French-made film, natu- 
ral color, being released by Metro-Goldwyn 
Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

C. R. of MT. VERNON— Nils Asther 
was Kit grown-up in "Sorrell and Son," 
was born in Sweden, about twenty-seven 
years ago, has dark hair and eyes. Write 
him at the Metro-Goldwyn Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. Paul Ralli, tennis star of 
Greece, is playing in "The Water Hole," 
starring Jack Holt. Charles Farrell, Mary 
Duncan and Margaret Mann are featured 
in "Backwash." 

TOMMY — Ramon Novarro was born 
in Durango, Mexico, February 6, 1899. 
He's five feet eight inches tall, weighs 
155 pounds. His next picture will be 
"Gold Braid." Billie Dove, born May 14, 
1901, five feet three, weighs 120 pounds, 
has brown hair and eyes. Renee Adoree, 



104 



Lille, France, twenty-six years ago. Five 
feet three, weighs 120 pounds, has dark 
hair and eyes. Norma Talmadge. Niagara 
Falls, N. Y., May 2, 1895. Let's hear 
from you again. 

A. M. R. — Glad to hear from you again. 
So you were fourteen when you first 
started reading Motion Picture Magazine. 
Haven't heard from Flossie. C. P. Alice 
is still your favorite, you may reach her 
at the First National Studios, Burbank, 
Cal. Johnnie Walker was born in 1898, 
married to Maud Wayne. 

NIZE BEBE— Statistics show that a 
locomotive is not afraid of an automobile. 
Baby Peggy is playing in vaudeville. Vir- 
ginia Lee Corbin is eighteen years old. 
She was in to see us a short time ago ; 
she's quite a young lady now. Address 
your letter to her care The Gotham Pro- 
ductions, Hollywood, Cal. Jetta Goudal 
is playing in "Her Cardboard Lover," star- 
ring Marion Davies. Antonio Moreno and 
Helene Costello in "The Midnight Taxi." 
Write Tony at the Warner Bros. Studios, 
5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

PEGGY MAE— William Collier, Jr., 
was born in New York City, February 22, 
1902. He is five feet ten inches tall, 
weighs 150 pounds, dark hair, brown eyes. 
His next picture will be "Tide of Empire," 
starring Renee Adoree. Clara Bow, 
August 8, 1905. Gary Cooper is single. 
Esther Ralston to George Webb. Write 
Snookums at the Universal Studios, Uni- 
versal City, Cal. "Our Gang," Hal Roach 
Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

FASCINATING— Bet your life I'm 
your friend. Write Charles Morton at the 
Fox Studios, 1401 N. Western Ave., Los 
Angeles, Cal. Mary Astor's real name is 
Lucille Langhanke ; she's married to 
Kenneth Hawks. Sue Carol is really 
Evelyn Lederer. Barry Norton has brown 
hair, dark brown eyes. Edmund Lowe is 
about thirty-five years old. 

POPULAR ANNE— 111 bet you are. 
Bob Seiter was Jack in "Chicago After 
Midnight." Don't believe he's married, 
not related to Nils Asther. Mary Pick- 
ford and Doug have been married since 
March 28, 1920. They have returned 
from Europe, both start on new produc- 
tions soon. Billie Dove is wed to Irwin 
Willat. Best regards to Babe. 

H. K., NEW YORK— Will group your 
favorites together. Ralph Forbes, John 
Gilbert, Lew Cody, Aileen Pringle, Norma 
Shearer and Greta Garbo can be reached 
at the Metro-Goldwyn Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. Clara Bow, Gary Cooper, Rich- 
ard Arlen, William Powell and Pola 
Negri at the Paramount Studios, 5451 
Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. Edmund 
Lowe was born on your birthday, March 
3rd. Einar Hansen died January 3, 1927. 

LITTLE ME — A barrister's wig is a 
covering of false hair closely fitting the 
head, worn in Great Britain by judges 
and barristers-at-law. But I don't wear 
one of 'em. You may address your letter 
to Sue Carol at the De Mille Studios, Cul- 
ver City, Cal. Philippe • De Lacey, Fox 
Studios, 1401 N. Western Ave., Los An- 
geles, Cal. Clara Bow is twenty-three 
years old. Marion Davies at the Metro- 
Goldwyn Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

POLLY R. — Larry Kent was born Sep- 
tember 15, 1900, five feet ten inches tall, 
has hazel eyes and brown hair. Your let- 
ter will reach him at the First National 
Studios, Burbank, Cal. Renee Adoree, five 
feet three, weighs 120 pounds, dark hair 
and eyes and is married to William Sher- 




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The Answer Man 

(Continued from page 104) 



man Gill, real estate man. Her next pic- 
ture will be "Four Walls." Write Renee 
at the Metro-Goldwyn Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. 

BUDDY ROGERS FAN— He is the best 
bet this month. Buddy was born in Olathe, 
Kans., August 13, 1904. His next picture 
will be "Varsity." He is under contract 
with Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon 
St., Hollywood, Cal. Claire Windsor, April 
14, 1898, playing in "A Grain of Dust," 
at the Tiffany-Stahl Productions, 933 N. 
Seward St., Hollywood, Cal. Bob Steele 
born in California. Bob has trained since 
childhood in the athletic outdoor activi- 
ties which he finds so useful in the series 
of youth and adventure pictures which he 
is now making for FBO Studios. 

KID BOOTS— That was a terrible joke 
about the Scotchman. Greta Garbo is five 
feet seven inches tall. Ronald Colman, 
born in England, February 9, 1891. Play- 
ing in "The Rescue," with Lili Damita, 
his new leading lady. Charles Farrell, 
twenty-three ; latest picture, "Backswash." 
Victor McLaglen, December 11, 1888, mar- 
ried ; send your note to the Fox Studios, 
1401 N. Western Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Don't believe his wife is jealous. 

LOLA B. — Sorry but he first set of the 
twenty-four pictures are exhausted. We'll 
be glad to supply you with set No. 2 or 
No. 3. Al Jolson can be reached at the 
Warner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., 
Hollywood, Cal. His latest picture is "The 
Singing Fool." Marceline Day at the 
Metro-Goldwyn Studios, Culver City, Cal. 
Lawrence Gray is twenty-eight years old. 
Richard Dix was operated on for ap- 
pendicitis. He is playing in "Warming 
Up." Marion Davies is not married. 

BOOTS— No, I can't say I like this hot 
weather. Lloyd Hughes was born in Bis- 
bee, Ariz., October ■ — , 1897. Gary Cooper, 
Helena, Mont., May 7, 1901. That is 
Richard Arlen's real name. "Big Boy," 
whose real name is Malcolm Sebastian, is 



not related to Dorothy Sebastian. Doro- 
thy, by the way, is playing in "Dancing 
Daughters." 

BOY — You sure are frank. Write Janel 
Gaynor at the Fox Studios, 1401 N. West- 
ern Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. Her latest 
picture is "Blossom Time." Bebe Daniels 
in "Hot News," Bebe at the Paramount 
Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. Robert Frazer. 

JUST ANOTHER FAN— You must 
come over. Loretta Young is fifteen 
years old. How'd you like her in "Laugh, 
Clown, Laugh"? Billie Dove was born 
in New York City, May 14, 1901. Phi- 
lippe De Lacey can be reached at the Fox 
Studios, 1401 N. Western Ave., Los An- 
geles, Cal. The little boy in "Tin Gods" 
was not mentioned on the cast. 

QUEENIE COY— Nice hand-writing, 
that. Clive Brook hails from England. 
Has a birthday June 1, 1891, brown hair, 
hazel eyes, married, has two children. His 
latest picture is "Forgotten Faces." Wil- 
liam Boyd was born 1898, he has blond 
hair and his wife is Elinor Fair. Clara 
Bow's latest picture is "The Fleet's In," 
James Hall plays opposite. Richard Tal- 
madge and Barbara Bedford are playing in 
"The Cavalier," write them at the Tiffany- 
Stahl Productions, 933 N. Seward St., Hol- 
lywood, Cal. 

A WILKES-BARREAN— Estelle Tay- 
lor and Jack Dempsey are Americans. Sue 
Carol is playing in "The Air Circus" ; 
she has been in pictures about a year, 
Lina Basquette in "Celebrity" ; Robert 
Armstrong plays opposite. Write them 
both at the De Mille Studios, Culver City, 
Cal. How's that for service? 

RED HAIR— What again? You refer 
to Dorothy Dunbar, Richard Barthelmess 
in "The Amateur Gentleman." Nancy 
Nash, Clifford Holland, "Rich But Honest," 
Priscilla Dean, Arnold Gray, "West of 
Broadway." John Barrymore, Marceline 



106 



They're 
Alive 



Regardless of precedents and 
press-agents, motion picture 
celebrities are alive. 

They're not stuffed dummies or 
just names spelled out in elec- 
tric lights. 

They're human. They get tired 
and they get -cross and they get 
hungry and they get fed and 
they get more cheery. 

They're unusual people, it's 
true. But you can't really ap- 
preciate their unusualness with- 
out being aware as well of their 
usualness. One thing is as im- 
portant as the other. You can't 
know what the stars are like 
unless you know both how 
they're like the people next 
door and how they're unlike 
them. 

MOTION PICTURE CLASSIC 
knows that — and prepares its 
news of the studios and its in- 
terpretation of the personalities 
that people them, from a sane 
and truthful standpoint. It 
neither deifies nor denies them. 
It simply understands them and 
likes them — and tells about 
them as they are. 

This means that as you read 
about the stars in CLASSIC, 
you read about real people. 
And in reading, you accomplish 
what you buy a movie maga- 
zine for — you become ac- 
quainted with them, really. 
You add them to your list of 
friends. 

Which is why, when you begin 
making up your list of maga- 
zines, you begin with MOTION 
PICTURE CLASSIC. 



It's the Magazine 

with the 

Personality 

The next — the September issue will 
be on the newsstands August 12 th 



Day, "The Beloved Rogue." Corinne Grif- 
fith, Einar Hansen, "The Lady in Ermine." 

A BRUNETTE— Lots of variety this 
month ; all we need now is a blonde. Mal- 
colm MacGregor was born October 13, 
1896, he is married and his latest picture 
is "The Girl on the Barge," starring Jean 
Hersholt, Sally O'Neil. Rudolph Valen- 
tino was born May 6, 1895, died August 
23, 1926. Donald Reed, July 23, 1902. 
Sorry, Don is married. His latest picture 
is "Show Girl." Send your letter to Don- 
ald at the First National Studios, Burbank, 
Cal. Eddie Phillips, Universal Studios, 
Universal City, Cal. 

JUST TERESA— Johnny Mack Brown 
is twenty-four years old. Virginia Lee 
Corbin, December 10, 1910; Charles 
Rogers, August 13, 1904; Olive Borden, 
July 17, 1904; Neil Hamilton, September 
18, 1899; Mary Brian, February 18, 1907; 
Sally O'Neil, October 28, 1908. Janet Gay- 
nor is twenty-two. Charles Farrell, twenty- 
three. Johnny Mack Brown is married. 

A. V. K. — Ben Alexander was born in 
Goldfield, Nev., in 1910. His next bit 
will be in "The River Pirate," starring 
Victor McLaglen. Write Ben at the Fox 
Studios, 1401 N. Western Ave., Los An- 
geles, Cal. Fay Wray, September 17, 1907. 
She is playing with Gary Cooper in "The 
First Kiss." I wonder? Allene Ray and 
Walter Miller's next serial will be "Ter- 
rible People," in production at the Pathe 
Studios, 4500 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

ALBERTA — Ivan Petrovich was born in 
Novi Sad, Siberia, thirty years ago, six 
feet tall, weighs 160 pounds. He's in 
Europe right now. I can supply you with 
his photo. Raymond Keane was John 
Guido in "The Magic Garden." 

ANNA R.— Henry B. Walthall was 
born March 16, 1880 ; he's married to 
Mary Charleson. Hobart Bosworth, Au- 
gust 11, 1867. His latest picture is "An- 
napolis." Your letter will reach him at 
the De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 
Conway Tearle, 1880, also married. Write 
him at the First Division Pictures, 1440 
N. Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 

VIVIAN VAMP — Barry Norton is 
twenty-three years old, real name Alfredo 
Di Birben. Laura La Plante was born 
St. Louis, Mo., November 1, 1904. Pola 
Negri, in Bromberg, Poland, January 
3, 1897. Francis X. Bushman has been 
playing in vaudeville but has decided to 
return to the screen. Joan Crawford is 
not married. Mary Brian's real name is 
Louise Dantzler. 

PRINCESS POCONO— Walter Pid- 
geon has played in the following pictures : 
"Honor the Woman," "Heart of Salome," 
"Woman Wise," "The Thirteenth Juror" 
and "Clothes Make the Woman." Write 
him at the Tiffany-Stahl Productions, 
4516 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. Greta 
Garbo is twenty-three ; latest picture, 
"War in the Dark." Send your note to 
the Metro-Goldwyn Studios, Culver City, 
Cal. 

TRLXIE— Well the dispute will be set- 
tled right now. Norma Shearer has re- 
turned from Europe, is married to Irving 
Thalberg and is at present working on 
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Whether or not Lois Wilson considers summer flirtations dangerous, doesn't matter. 
With her involved, there's no doubt of it. But the thrill would be worth the peril 

Are Summer Flirtations Dangerous ? 

(Continued from page 31) 



such formula. She knows her men and 
she knows that the weather is an unim- 
portant element." 

James Hall, however, contends that 
summer flirtations are comparatively harm- 
less. He thinks that a girl is more in- 
clined to capture her man under stress of 
gloomy or inclement weather. 

"If I merely wanted to flirt with a girl, 
I would take a chance in summertime," 
Mr. Hall admits, cautiously. "Such flirta- 
tions are seldom dangerous. They pass off 
as gently as they come. But flirt with a 
girl when you are both seeking shelter 
from a terrific wind or snowstorm — then 
you are treading on risky ground ! Give 
me the good old summertime for light and 
flirtatious love-making !" 

That authority on love and .romance, 
D. W. Griffith, says that nothing is harm- 
ful that is a biological necessity. Love in 
the spring and summer is right because it 
is necessary to the advancement of the 
race. The human organization undergoes 
an emotional awakening after winter dor- 
mancy. Summer flirtations are conducted 
successfully by animals and flowers. All 
nature is constituted so that its most 
beautiful aspects are presented in spring 
and summer. Love is the most beautiful 
aspect of life. Emotions are suppressed in 
winter and flirtations get rid of suppressed 
desires harmlessly. Flirtations are natu- 
ral demonstrations provided by an all-wise 
Providence. 

There is a chorus of feminine dissents. 

"Why not ask 'Is dynamite dangerous ?' 
The seasoned blaster will tell you that 
dynamite is not dangerous, but he will add : 
'It is harmless if you know how to handle 



it' " This comment from Betty Compson. 

"Flirtation is a pretense of feeling what 
you don't feel. I believe in being square ; 
and flirtations seem like cheating to me," 
says Louise Fazenda. 

"If you're a character-reader and can 
select the other party to your flirtation, you 
may pass through it unharmed. But you 
may not. A wife at the shore who fills 
her idle moments with the attentions of a 
stranger while her husband slaves at his 
city desk, is satisfying a bootleg appetite 
for thrills." This from May McAvoy. 

Firtations Are Good Practice 

f~\ N the other hand 

"How could anything as pleasant as a 
flirtation be harmful as long as it is not 
taken for anything more~ serious?" de- 
mands Marie Prevost, pugnaciously. "I 
should say if you choose the proper set- 
ting and time and the right characters 
there can be no more harm in a summer 
flirtation than there is in having tea with 
Mrs. Jones. Certainly there is more en- 
joyment." 

"Flirt summer or winter or any old 
season !" cries Dale Fuller. "It's a good 
way to kill time." 

"It's a waste of time," argues Esther 
Ralston. 

"It seems to me, in thinking back over 
my youth," observes George Fawcett, 
"that summer flirtations were good prac- 
tice for the big love of one's life." 

"Anything is dangerous if you do it to 
excess," is Laura La Plante's contribution 
to the discussion. 

"I'm not the type, but I want my daugh- 



108 



r <* Betty to have as many flirtations as 
she can manage. It's good training," says- 
Mrs. Wallace Reid. 

"The danger depends on whether or not 
you're afraid of marriage," puts in Arthur 
Lubin. "I always feel more romantic 
when the weather is fine, so summertime 
would be more hazardous if I were in the 
East. In England the proper season would 
be April, and I understand that winter in 
Japan is delightful. In California, there's 
good flirting weather all year round." 

Richard Dix declares that he has tried 
to make something serious out of flirta- 
tion more than once, but failed every time, 
so he can't see why they should be consid- 
ered dangerous. 

"They are a relaxation," agrees Lois 
Wilson, "a change from studio sets. Say, 
we go to the shore for a vacation. Here's 
a new scene and a new leading man, a 
moon and a warm, fragrant breeze. It's 
the hero's role to come forward with a 
Where have you been all my life?' look, 
and the heroine's part to respond with a 
'Just waiting for you to show up' expres- 
sion. With the end of vacation, the play 
is over." 

Fritzi Ridgway sounds a warning to 
those who take flirtations lightly. 

"It was summer," she relates. "I made 
a personal appearance at a theater show- 
ing 'The Old Homestead.' Constantin 
Bakaleinakof was conducting the orches- 
tra. We had a whirlwind flirtation. In 
three days he proposed and we were mar- 
ried. We're still married, though that is 
six years ago." 

"How can one find the true love if 
flirtations are not encouraged?" Sue Carol 
wants to know. 

"They're a tonic after fifty weeks of 
work," laughs Marian Nixon. "They're 
not only harmless, but nice." 

Virginia Valli insists that of course 
flirtations are dangerous ; that's why we 
enjoy them. There's no fun in flirting 
with the staid next-door neighbor — the 
other party to the romance must be a 
stranger — here today and gone tomorrow, 
zzlt's the risk of the thing's becoming seri- 
ous that puts the kick in the game. 

"A moonstroke is as dangerous as a sun- 
stroke," cautions Charlie Byer. "One can 
say and do the most extraordinary things 
to an attractive person of the opposite sex 
under the influence of mellow moonlight. 
Cupid becomes tricky in summer — so be- 
ware !" 

But Andres de Segurola thinks a summer 
without a flirtation would be a frightful 
bore. Everyone who goes for a few weeks' 
outing is secretly hoping for a bit of 
romance. 

"There's no stopping the things after 
they start, though," mourns Carmel Myers. 
"They're fascinating, but oh, my !" 

Over on the Fox lot, it's a draw. The 
men think flirtations dangerous and the 
girls laugh at the idea. 

"No more dangerous than TNT," is 
George O'Brien's opinion. 

"Why pick on summer?" sighs Edmund 
Lowe. 

"You usually need to send out an SOS 
before the thing's over," contributes Char- 
lie Farrell, and Victor McLaglen sagely 
remarks : "Some are and some aren't. 
Don't take a chance." 

"Part of life's curriculum!" laughs Lois 
Moran, while Janet Gaynor and Madge 
Bellamy agree that tinsel romance should 
be taken as lightly as "Forty — Love!" in 
tennis. 

"They start out innocently," confides 
William Haines. "Girls pretend to be in 
fun, but there's always dirty work afoot 
and every girl hopes the tennis match is 
going to end up at the altar." 






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Gaynor, Janet 
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Gish, Lillian 
Griffith, Corinne 

Joy, Leatrice 

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Kent, Barbara 
Kenyon, Doris 

La Plante, Laura 
Logan, Jacqueline 



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Marchal, Arlette 
McAvoy, May 
Moore, Colleen 
Moran, Lois 
Negri, Pola 
Nissen, Greta 



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Philbin, Mary 

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Ray, Allene 
Reynolds, Vera 

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Shearer, Norma 
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Talmadge, Constance 
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Terry, Alice 

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Velez, Lupe 
Vidor, Florence 

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Windsor, Claire 
Wray, Fay 

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Alvarado, Don 
Allen, Hugh 
Asther, Nils 

Barrymore, John 



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Chandler, Lane 

De Lacey, Philippe 
Delaney, Charles 
D'Arcy, Roy 
Denny, Reginald 
Dix, Richard 



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Forbes, Ralph 

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Gilbert, John 
Gray, Lawrence 

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Hall, James 
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Maynard, Ken 
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Stone, Lewis 
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9 M. P. 



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109 




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Chester Conklin justifies his blowing his own horn by the assertion that music hath charms. 
But Mary Brian, whose ear is nearest, takes exception to his excuse. It's all accordion, she 

points out, to what you call music 



Butchering Brains 

(Continued from page 29) 



They are the big guns that the author 
must propitiate, defer to, conciliate, flatter, 
begu'le, if he would remain in Holly- 
wood. 

Golden Rules for Writers 

^ladys Unger, playwright and author of 
"Romance," "Starlight" and many 
other well-known plays, gives the follow- 
ing recipe to aspiring movie writers : 

' Study pantomime, fencing, boxing, Yid- 
dish, Russian and German. Forget Eng- 
lish, American, reading and writing." 

The situation is not devoid of edifica- 
tion to the author. He is filled with un- 
holy joy and admiration as he scans the 
patent medicine advertisements of his new 
contemporaries. 

I AM AN AUTHOR AND I CAN 
PROVE IT! 

Thus ingenuously proclaims Bennie Ba- 
lonsky in a full-page ad in a film trade 
paper. 

I WANT THE WORLD TO KNOW 

THAT IT WAS I WHO WROTE: 

"I AM YOUR WIFE!" 

Thus another Susy Swipes. Her num- 
ber is legion in Hollywood. She is 
perched in the softest and plumpest of 
the seats of the mighty, and sometimes, so 
I have heard, she is perched upon the 
knee of a movie executive. 

Irvin Cobb is credited with a classic 
utterance at the end of a chaotic confer- 
ence. I dare not misquote him, but I do 
know that his words conveyed a cordial 
invitation to the manhandlers of his brain 
product to cut a chunk of their throats and 
take the trail to a certain city whose tem- 
perature is high. 

Michael Aden left Hollywood gasping 
and smarting. 

Hergesheimer studied Hollywood through 



his shining specs, with resulting excellent 
publicity for the charming Aileen Pringle. 
Clever girl, Aileen. The first of the stars 
to become known as "The Authors' 
Friend !" 

George Jean Nathan dodged the lime- 
light in the company of a modest blazing 
star. 

Laurence Stallings chucked his tongue 
in his cheek. Occasionally gargantuan 
laughter proclaimed his appreciation of 
the whole large humor of Hollywood. 

Once, as scenario editor, I recommended 
Ellis Parker Butler's classic : "Pigs Is 
Pigs." I was shouted down with the ob- 
jection that the censors and Will Hays 
would never stand for a picture about hogs. 

Dixie Wilson blew into Hollywood — if 
one of bouffant form may be said to blow, 
waving triumphantly an extraordinary 
contract. No mere scenario writer was 
this girl from the Ringling Circus to be ; 
but a full-fledged director — so said Dixie. 
Three or six months later, Dixie exited as 
silently as a mouse. 

Carl Van Vechten peeped in at the win- 
dow, cocked a quizzical eyebrow and, 
tongue in cheek, extolled the virtues of the 
movie city, which he proposed to send 
down to posterity via the pages of his 
next book. 

Edmund Goulding Prospers 

E*dmund Goulding dropped in merely to 
have a look around. He expected to 
stay a day or two. He remained to become 
one of its greatest scenarists and directors. 
Now he is back in New York, with two 
of his plays in rehearsal and a novel on 
the press. He will return to Hollywood. 
Hollywood is not Hollywood without him, 
and there are a score of down-and-outers 
who miss the lift, the encouraging, snappy 
word and the dollar or two that Eddie 
was wont to slip into their hands so gen- 
erously. 
"Well, how do you like it?" asked a fa- 



110 



/ 



'mous producer of Clarence Budington 
Kelland, after he had permitted the author 
to see the screen version of one of his 
stories. Falling into the producer's own 
idiom, Kelland replied : 

"I ain't a-going to kiss you !" 

Dorothy Farnum reminds one of Anita 
Loos. She looks like a schoolgirl, a very 
pretty blonde one, and has the brain of a 
literary Napoleon. She tripped out of 
magazine writing and insinuated her way 
deftly to the very peak of scenario writing. 
Only master scripts are assigned her. 
"Beau Brummel," "Tess of the D'Urber- 
villes," the Garbo opuses, are from her 
pen. Like Frances Marion, she is pos- 
sessed of exceptional beauty and brains. 
Frances Marion, incidentally, is without a 
doubt the greatest of the scenario writers. 
She is also a novelist. 

Winifred Dunn, who wrote for the bet- 
ter class magazines before the movies cap- 
tured her, looks like what we imagine 
Jane Eyre did. It seems incredible that 
this fragile girl is responsible for that epic 
of a pug, "The Patent-Leather Kid." 
"Sparrows" is another original of Miss 
Dunn's. 

Donald McGibney stayed long enough to 
adapt his Saturday Evening Post story, 
"Two Arabian Knights," and hurried back 
to New York. But Hollywood had gotten 
into his blood. He is back now. He says 
he is competing with the butcher, the jani- 
tor, the mayor, the plumber and every 
other person in Hollywood as a scenarist. 

Doty Thought Dotty 

|~)ouglas Doty, be-spectacled, scholarly 
"high-brow writer and editor of the 
Century Magazine, startled the sober and 
respectable world of which he was a prized 
ornament by suddenly breaking the chains 
and shackles that bound him to his edito- 
rial chair and home. He shot out for 
Hollywood. There he appeared with all 
the bubbling spirits and jazzy clothes of a 
college youth. What an exhilarating sea- 
son followed. The former editor dropped 
ten years of his age, and even acquired 
height. He no longer indites high-brow 
editorials, but sparkling scenarios, and, 
moreover, he has acquired the prettiest 
little movie wife imaginable and an ador- 
able Doty Junior. 

This, however, is only one and an un- 
usually exceptional instance of a profes- 
sional writer's successful assimilation into 
the motion picture industry. The average 
literary man finds himself quite unable to 
cope with the viewpoint of the film-makers. 
Too, he is not infrequently aghast at their 
conception of him and his work. 

Was it not Arthur Stringer, who submitted 
"Perils of the Deep" to a well-known 
producer, and was nearly paralyzed when 
said producer threw it back at him with: 

"Naw ! Don't want no more stories 
about pearls !" 

Said an Eminent Author to an Eminent 
Producer : 

"May I have the honor of dedicating 
my new book to you?" 

"Certainly," replied the flattered pro- 
ducer. "When do you wish me to be ready 
and where does the ceremony take place?" 

The_ author was young and he had been 
born in Australia. The supervisor was 
also young, and he had been born on Ellis 
Island. Said the supervisor: 

"You come from Australia?" 

"Yes, sir." 

"Hm. Speak Austrian, heh?" 

]jWhy, no, sir." 

"How long have you been in this coun- 
try?" 

"One month." 

"What ! Where you learn to speak 
English so quick?" 



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Outsiders might say that it was tremendously fine of J. Warren Kerrigan to build such a house 
as this for his mother. But he would tell you that it was really her inspiration of him that 

enabled him to 

No Mother to Guide him 

{Continued from page 72) 



But Jack has always borne his burdens 
cheerfully. He wouldn't, indeed, let you 
call them burdens at all. They are his 
"dear life interests." 

For isn't there also that handsome little 
fellow — his brother Wallace's four-year- 
old boy, named for Jack? The elder Jack 
worships him. 

Remember the Universal Star? 

'"To all outward appearances, Jack is just 
the same youth he was when we knew 
him as a Universal star twelve or thirteen 
years ago. He still wears that lovely Irish 
grin of his, which crinkles at the corners 
of his clear hazel eyes and illumines his 
white teeth in the midst of his healthy 
red-brown skin. Only his hair is white ! 

Yes, and there is this : something has 
gone out of him ! 

Jack tells you that himself. He knows 
it. It is the inspiration that his mother 
was to him. 

What Jack doesn't know — he couldn't 
know it, perhaps, measuring his sorrow — 
is that something else replaces that some- 
thing which he has lost. But, because 
Jack Kerrigan is now what he is, that 
home of his there on Cahuenga — the ram- 
bling, long house with its wings and its 
endless verandas and its gardens — is an 
oasis in hectic Hollywood, a green resting 
place in the hot, mad fray, and Jack is its 
king. . 

Yet no one can say that his life isn't 
different from what it would have been 
had his mother lived. A sensitive soul 
.was deprived at the height of his success 
of its inspiration. To understand what 
Jack is, with all his wide, kindly philoso- 
phy, his understanding, one must explain 
what he was. 

The complete idolizing of a human being 
is always hard to explain. In fact, it can't 
be. It just has to be understood without 
explanation. Jack knows that. He doesn't 
try to explain. He doesn't talk much 
about his mother to most people, he said. 

"Mother said that she would be always 
with me. And she is." 

There is nothing of the fanatic in the 
way Jack says that. It is just a clear con- 
viction. 

We were on the veranda now, and he 



was thoughtful for a moment, as he 
stroked one of those beloved fox-terriers 
of his. Jack is old-fashioned enough to 
like fox-terriers — none of those fierce po- 
lice dogs or chows for him ! 

After a while he went on : 

"There is a wonderful portrait of 
Mother in the hall. She seems always to 
be waiting for me there." 

He led me in to look at it. That started 
me dreaming, too. For I knew Jack's 
mother well. 

It was a gorgeous day, that Sunday 
afternoon so very long ago when I trav- 
eled up to the house that Jack built. On 
the porch I found a frail but how spirited 
little lady seated in a wheel-chair ! She 
hadn't been out of that chair for years. 
She was an invalid. But she had done her 
work well. She had managed to raise, 
with the help of her boy Jack, those six 
boys and one girl of hers. 

And how clever they had all turned out 
to be, to be sure ! 

Kathleen Kerrigan, the one girl, had 
every right to be spoiled. But she wasn't. 
Kathleen was there with us that bright 
afternoon, a fine, charming, cultured 
woman, married, even then, quite a long 
time. 

Kerrigan's Famous Open House 

|/"errigan Sunday afternoons were fa- 
mous in Hollywood in those days. All 
the noted people of stage and screen 
dropped in, and Jack and his invalid 
mother kept open house. Mary Pickfqrd 
and her mother came often. They were 
very fond of Mrs. Kerrigan. And now 
Mary's mother has gone, too ! 

That afternoon there was a noted vio- 
linist and an artist or two, whose names 
I'm ashamed to confess I do not recall 
now, and there were Allan Dwan and 
Pauline Bush, Dwan's wife, since di- 
vorced ; and there were Madame Aldrich, 
the grand opera singer ; Francis X. Bush- 
man, Lois Wilson. She was little more 
than a child then, and clad in the love- 
liest pink taffeta gown with three ruffles 
on it ; and Jack's brother Wallace, with 
his lovely wife and beautiful, ill-fated 
daughter, who was burned to death three 
(Continued on page 117) 






112 



When Is a Story Stolen ? 

(Continued from page 55) 



by writing scenarios for you.' I get 
scripts from drummers, society women, 
concert pianists and waiters — their copy 
ornamented with soup spots. But there 
isn't one real scenario idea to a thousand 
scripts. Amateurs generally write about 
two things, either something they them- 
selves have read in a book or seen on the 
screen, or they tell their own life stories. 

"Most people lead commonplace lives. 
Even their sorrows and their tragedies are 
the same things that happen to a million 
other commonplace people. But to them they 
are interesting, absorbing, unique. I get a 
lot of scripts submitted by convicts serving 
life sentences in prison. The stories are 
about their own fall, the usual sordid tale 
■of temptation and yielding and regrets. 
But they think it's the most important 
story ever written. Then I get manu- 
scripts from women on lonely ranches. 
Maybe their husband has run away with 
another woman and left them struggling 
to support several children. They don't 
realize this has happened to anyone else in 
the history of the world. They think their 
story must be original, because it's theirs." 

A war veteran in the San Diego Hos- 
pital is suing Universal at the present 
moment because its picture "Buck Pri- 
vates" tells the story of his own experi- 
ences with the Army of Occupation. A 
search of the studio books reveals the fact 
that he did submit a story dealing with his 
experiences on the Rhine. But so did a 
dozen others ! Almost every studio made 
one picture on that phase of the war. 
Metro-Goldwyn produced "Tin Helmets." 
A Universal director wrote a script called 
"Let's Go Home." The scenario finally 
chosen was written by Stuart Lake, an- 
other World War veteran, and was based 
on his experiences, which were no doubt 
similar to the experiences of the indignant 
ex-private at San Diego. 

"Any theme played up in the newspapers 
will bring a hundred scripts by return 
mail," Montaigne points out. "When 



Judge Ben Lindsey spoke on Companionate 
Marriage, four different studios imme- 
diately announced intentions of making a 
picture on Companionate Marriage. I sup- 
pose we got fifty scripts with that as a 
theme. We're going to make one ourself, 
called 'Don't Announce Your Marriage.' 
When it comes out, we'll get a howl from 
every one of the fifty writers, 'You have 
stolen my plot !' " 

The breaking of the St. Francis dam in 
California formed the theme of thirty-two 
manuscripts submitted to one studio alone. 

Plots drawn from the classics or from 
history are not originals and cannot be 
stolen, Edward Montaigne holds. When a 
writer discovers some obscure incident in 
history and brings it to the attention of the 
studios, his services are usually rewarded 
with a small check, but it is only an 
original treatment of such themes which 
makes them personal possessions. 

"For instance," says Montaigne, "we 
have on hand now four scripts on Poca- 
hontas. The story of Pocahontas is com- 
mon property, but one scenario writer has 
worked out a treatment of the legend, 
showing how the blood of the Indian 
Princess has been passed through the gen- 
erations into the veins of a President of 
the United States. I consider his script an 
original." 

After the release of De Mille's "King 
of Kings" half a dozen suits for plagiarism 
were threatened, and one — that of Valaska 
Surratt — is actually being taken to court, 
despite the fact that all the scenes and 
incidents of the "King of Kings" follow 
the New Testament story so closely that 
no one except Matthew, Mark, Luke or 
John could claim to be plagiarized. 

But if Paul Revere's evening jaunt, 
Washington's famous ferry trip across the 
Delaware and Cleopatra's way with her 
boy friends are common property, the 
studios have no desire to duplicate each 
other. Historical films are too expensive. 
(Continued on page 115) 




Those who have produced Hibernian-Hebrew pictures since the stage success of "Abie's Irish 
Rose" say that imputations of plagiarism stretch credulity as far as Mrs. Kelly does her 

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either for the dinner or upon the appetites of fifteen needy women, guests of Louise 
Fazenda. She came to their aid right in the pic-nick of time 



Making Life Loutseitr 

(Continued from page 71) 



The Ear-Benders 

pTxTRAS, electricians, assistant directors, a 
star of the first magnitude. People. 
Human beings discussing the intimacies of 
their lives with a sympathetic woman. 
And Louise, in her comic make-up, her 
figure stuffed out to alarming proportions, 
her hair pinned up over old-fashioned 
rats, steel-rimmed glasses upon her nose, 
wrinkles penciled upon her smooth face — 
was ready and eager to listen and to help. 

She does these things with such sim- 
plicity. When she had a vacation from 
her own strenuous job a short time ago, 
she gathered up three old ladies from an 
old ladies' home and took them with her 
to San Francisco. They stayed at a good 
hotel and they shopped and went to the- 
aters and did the exciting round of sight- 
seeing. 

"How did you happen to do that?" some- 
one asked Louise. "You didn't really 
know those women." 

"Well — they were getting pretty old, and 
I thought that if they were going to have 
any fun, they'd better hurry up and have 
it," was her reply. Which seemed ade- 
quate enough. 

She does not want thanks for her friend- 
ly deeds. When she saw an old man gaz- 
ing wistfully into a bakery window, she 
entered the shop, peered out to try to find 
out exactly what it was he was wishing 
for — bought a huge box of cakes and 
cookies and coffee cake. Then she popped 
out of the shop, thrust the box into his 
astonished arms, hopped into her car and 
was away before he could see who she 
was. 

On her days off — those brief and far- 
between days when she is not working — 
she goes down town alone to haunt rail- 
way stations, rest rooms in department 
stores and lobbies of cheap hotels. No one 
recognizes her because she is entirely dif- 
ferent off the screen from the clown you 
see in pictures. 



Looking for Trouble 

"I just sit a little while in one of these 
places," she relates, "and sooner or 
later someone comes up to me and tells me 
about himself — or herself. They just seem 
to recognize that I should like to help 
them. 

"That is why I think I might be able to 
do these things in a bigger way. I should 
have assistants to investigate cases where 
money seemed to be needed. But there 
are people with enormous incomes who 
often need mental help. So many folks 
have the wrong attitude toward life. They 
think negative thoughts and let their in- 
feriority complexes get the better of them. 

"Another reason I think I might be 
good at it is that I have lived so diversely. 
There can be hardly any human experi- 
ence which I have not had — or which I 
have not seen someone close to me go 
through — in my life. 

"Human problems, like story plots, are 
mostly mere variations of a few basic situ- 
ations. They differ with different person- 
alities. But basically they are much the 
same for everyone. And they can be tabu- 
lated and diagnosed that way. 

"Sometimes I hear of one with which I 
do not know how to deal. It is a tremen- 
dous responsibility — trying to advise a per- 
son ! But I ask for a little time, and then 
I think hard and study — sometimes for 
several days. Then I send for the person 
and tell him what I have decided. I make 
mistakes, of course. Any doctor makes 
them ! And it takes so much time to pro- 
duce results. 

"There was a girl who had a serious or- 
ganic disorder which necessitated an op- 
eration if she was to live. But she was 
so terribly afraid of doctors and hospitals. 
It took two or three years of very gentle 
influences to get her in the frame of mind 
to go and have that operation ! But she 
went — finally. And now she is well!" 
(Continued on page 121) 



. 



/ 



/ 

vV^hen Is a Story Stolen ? 

(Continued from page 113) 

So they register their intentions with the 
Hays office in Hollywood and make sure 
that no one else will make a similar picture. 

"We've been discussing a George Wash- 
ington story for a long time," Montaigne 
admits ruefully. "Finally we thought to 
call up the Hays office and they told us 
that there were two companies ahead of 
us with a Washington film. Then we 
wanted to use the Ride of the Six Hun- 
dred, and someone else had spoken for 
that, too. We decided to do a picture 
dealing with the laying of the first Atlantic 
cable — and Metro had already filed inten- 
tions on that. A man is suing us now 
because in 'The Phantom of the Opera' 
we showed a flash of a stage scene from 
'Faust.' He claims that he owns all stage 
and dramatic rights to 'Faust.' Of course, 
all he can own is some one unique treat- 
ment of the 'Faust' legend. 

"Two people often hit on the same idea 
at the same time. I was reading the 
Memoirs of Paul Blouet, the famous news- 
paper correspondent, some years ago, and 
ran across an incident which I thought 
would make a great picture. It was the 
ruse by which he got inside news of the 
doings of a very secret international con- 
ference. A delegate friend of his wore a 
hat exactly like Blouet's. At dinner time 
the reporter dined- at the same restaurant 
as the heavily guarded delegates, and at 
the end of the meal took down his friend's 
hat instead of his own. Concealed in the 
lining was a finely written transcript of 
the entire proceedings of the conference. 
I made a scenario around this historical 
incident, and was about to sell it when I 
read a story by Richard Harding Davis, 
which had exactly the same plot. He and 
I had read the same Memoirs ! Again, I 
wrote last year a scenario called 'The Port 
of the Missing Women,' and we were 
about to make it into a picture when 
Irving Cummings came out with a photo- 
play of the same title, and with almost 
exactly the same plot! 

"When the cost of a production runs 
from three hundred thousand to a million, 
it is absurd to suppose that any studio 
would steal a plot when they could buy 
one for a thousand dollars. Besides, the 
scenario writers never see the scripts that 
are submitted. These are passed on by 
our readers who have nothing to do with 
the writing end." 

Anyone who submits a scenario to a 
studio may, for fifty cents, have the Screen 
Writers' Guild seal a duplicate of the story 
in an envelope, stamp it with the date, and 
lock it up in a safety deposit vault. Yet 
in spite of these things amateur writers 
continue to clamor that their brains are 
being burglarized. 

"My hero was a banker," they cry, "my 
heroine was his stenographer — and they 
fell in love just like that picture! They 
stole my plot !" 

These threats of plagiarism are destroy- 
ing the market for original stories. Most 
of the studios are eager for new ideas. 
Universal itself advertises for original 
plots at great expense once a week in a 
great national magazine, but the cost of 
defending themselves against these silly 
and unjust lawsuits has already led Famous 
Players and De Mille to send out word 
that they will not examine any manu- 
scripts submitted to them. The convicts 
with new life stories, the barbers and 
bakers and carpenters with different plots, 
the ranchers' wives with the most inter- 
esting story ever written are closing the 
doors of the motion picture studios to 
writers with real picture ideas. 



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The world at his feet: Nick Stuart, once a camera-boy and now a star, surveys the New 
York skyline from a part of it, the roof of a skyscraper 

Join the Movies and See the World! 

(Continued from page 50) 



"Gee, Dorothy," he said enthusiastically, 
"I've had some great breaks in my last 
couple of pictures — not only in the good 
parts I have had to play but in the oppor- 
tunity they've given me to travel around 
and see the world. The Marines have 
nothing on the movies for covering terri- 
tory." 

You can imagine what that must have 
meant to a kid who might never have seen 
those far-famed and expensive locales if 
it hadn't been for the movies. 

"New York was a revelation to me. I 
stood around and gawked at the tall build- 
ings just like the proverbial hick. Believe 
me, I didn't let any chance go by to see 
everything there was to see. I went up in 
the arm of the Statue of Liberty and I 
rode up to the top of the Woolworth 
Building. One day I hired a taxi and 
rode all through Central Park. But most 
of the time I just walked around. Those 
taxis went so darn fast I was afraid I 
would miss something. They're cheap, 
though, aren't they ?" observed Nick, who 
comes from a place where taxis are higher 
than orchids. "You can ride all over New 
York for fifty cents. The rest of the 
things are so high I guess they have to 
have something cheap there. 

"I met the Honorable James Walker at a 
charity ball there and after talking to 
him a little while it wasn't Hard to under- 
stand why the New Yorkers call their 
mayor, 'Jimmy.' He's one prince of a 
fellow and seemed awfully interested in 
the movies." 

Talking to the Mayor of New York — 
and only a couple of years back he was 
doing odd jobs in Hollywood. Hey! Hey! 
And on my sets, too ! I thought of my 
own recent trip to New York. I hadn't 
met the mayor. You can bet your savings 
account on that. 

"Palm Beach was mighty nice, too," 
went on Nick, in the manner of Burton 
Holmes. "While we were there I had 
lunch with Gene Tunney and while I had 



read about what a nice, quiet fellow he is, 
even so I wasn't prepared for his shyness. 
I think a lot of people mistake Tunney 's 
quietness for the high-hat, which it isn't 
at all. He hasn't Dempsey's happy faculty 
for glad-handing everybody, but some 
people just can't do that — and I think Gene 
Tunney is one of them. 

"I saw him around on the beach in his 
bathing suit often and I was a little sur- 
prised at his physique. He isn't as mus- 
cular as I imagined a champion would be, 
but maybe that was because he was out of 
training." 

But to get along with Nick's travelogue, 
he found Havana a slightly dirty place of 
narrow streets that is worse than Paris in 
the practice of gypping tourists. 

"The only thing they give away free in 
Havana is the beer," he commented. 
"Those free-beer gardens down there fas- 
cinated me. These gardens are very pic- 
turesque — and you can sit there as long as 
you like and drink all the beer you want — 
free of charge. 

"But the thing that got me most about 
Havana was the graveyard! Talk 
about gypping — why, they even gyp the 
dead down there if they haven't money to 
keep up their payments on their lots in 
the graveyard. Here is the way they do : 
they bury all the dead and keep them 
buried if their families have the money to 
buy the grave lot. But in case they 
haven't the money, they dig them up several 
months later and make way for some 
other body that can afford the resting 
place. The bones of the others are tossed 
together in a huge iron vault-like thing in 
the center of the cemetery. This seemed 
almost heathenish to me. But at that it 
was kinda interesting to find out how the 
other half of the world lives. 

"It's almost all settled that Sally Phipps 
and I are going to Europe to make a pic- 
ture, sort of a sequel to 'The News Pa- 
rade' called 'Touring Through Europe,' " 
Nick wound up our little talk. 



116 



s 



/ 



No Mother to Guide Him 



(Continued from page 112) 
years ago when her clothing caught fire it (I 



from a lighted Christmas candle, and 
Wally's eldest son. Wallace has three 
sons now. 

Somebody inside was playing the piano, 
but the rest of us sat out on the long 
veranda of the rambling house, in the 
wicker chairs and swing hammocks, under 
large, gaily colored sun umbrellas, under- 
neath which the bright-colored dresses of 
the girls made a pretty picture. 

We heard that day the discussions about 
the Hollywood Bowl. I forgot to say that 
Carrie Jacobs Bond was one of the guests. 
The Hollywood Bowl, since grown so fa- 
mous, wasn't in existence then. But Mrs. 
Kerrigan was much interested. 

And it was on that very veranda that 
the Bowl was voted into existence, a few 
weeks afterward, with Mrs. Carter, the 
president ; Mrs. Bond and the other musi- 
cal enthusiasts present. 

"Now I don't entertain any more. I 
never shall. I just can't get the spirit 
back !" 

Jack brought me out of my reverie. 

This Sunday was just as bright with 
sunshine as that other Sunday. But every- 
thing was silence now. There were no 
gay sun umbrellas on the veranda, no 
pretty dresses, no gay talk. 

Perhaps more important still to his 
many fans, who still write letters implor- 
ing him to come back to the screen, he has 
never worked since, except in a very few 
pictures. 

No Heart for Further Work 

I just don't care to work any more. 
Oh, I won't say that I won't," he ex- 
plained cheerily, "but I would play only 
those parts that appealed to me — parts in 
which my friends could be proud of me — 
and yes, my mother, too ! 

"You know," Jack spoke up quickly as 
though to loosen some flood of feeling 
within him, "I did not want to take that 
engagement in 'The Covered Wagon.' 
Didn't want to go on that long location 
trip. But Mother begged me to. After I 
had left, she told the others, I found out 
later, T shall never see my boy again !' I 
think she knew she was going to leave me. 
I think she didn't wish me to be with her 
t at the last. I think she wanted me to re- 
member her as she was, so alive ! 

"It was a terrible ride home from loca- 
tion when mother was passing !" Jack 
never uses the word "death" in connection 
with his mother. "My brother Wally was 
with her. No — no, I didn't get there in 
time ! But she left messages, many mes- 
sages for me !" 

It is quite plain all that is as though it 
were yesterday with Jack. 

And ah, those messages ! There was so 
much more meaning in them than any- 
body who conveyed them could know. It 
wasn't just the words. It was hardly the 
words at all, in fact. It was just the 
little drifting memories they roused, the 
poignant, cherished understandings, fleet- 
ing tendernesses that were hardly more 
than the trembling accent of a tone, the 
pressure of a hand. 

"Mother was just one who will live on 
always," said Jack with that simple con- 
viction of his. "But, no, that's not true 
of everyone. Some souls destroy their 
own memories in our hearts as they go 
along !" 

Jack looked off toward the poppy- 
strewn hills. 

"Sorrow isn't what we think it is," he 
said. "I thought at first I couldn't bear 



mean when we were putting her 
away), so when we came home I begged 
to be allowed to come into the house 
alone. But the moment I passed the 
threshold I knew she was there with me. 
That terrible burden was lifted!" 

There Is to Be a New House 

Jack is going to sell that old house with 
all its memories ! 

"Well, it doesn't matter," he said when 
I half demurred. "Mother will be with 
me wherever I go." 

And would he take her things? 

Oh, yes, surely. And that little willow- 
tree that he planted, a little willow slip it 
was from one of her funeral bouquets. 
All the flowers he can manage. • 

And her room, we wondered. Well, yes, 
he would take that furniture with him, of 
course. Place it in a room to remember 
her by, just as it was in the old house. 

"You see," he told me, "her room is 
just as it was when she went away. It 
has never been disturbed. It is never 
opened except when Sis comes. Sis loves 
the room. She prefers it to her own. 

"I couldn't leave that furniture of hers 
nor sell it. I used always, you know, to 
tuck mother in of nights. Even if it was 
three o'clock in the morning when I came 
home, I'd always have to go into her 
room, and tell her good night. 

"And the mornings sometimes, too, still 
seem lonely. She always insisted on hav- 
ing breakfast with me. Even when she 
could hardly get about, before she took to 
her wheel-chair for good, she insisted on 
making my breakfast. She thought it 
wouldn't be just right unless she fixed it 
herself." 

And Jack never plays the piano nor 
sings since his mother "went away." 

Who can explain the holy mystery of 
that "closeness" with the thing itself so 
rare that no words have ever been in- 
vented to describe it? 

"I haven't," Jack went on, "missed my 
work at all ! You see, I have a few busi- 
ness interests, and I take entire care of 
this half-acre about my house. No hand 
except mine touches these plants. 

"I have occasionally a friend here, and 
I have my fox-terriers. One of them has 
just had pups, great little beggars," he 
pointed to the basket presided over by 
their importantly anxious and growling 
mamma. "And there are the birds. Why, 
the quail in the hills up there bring their 
young right down here to my shrubbery. 

"I never go out anywhere, because I 
don't care for night life. I have my books. 
Sometimes I read all night ! 

"I mean to travel. After I sell this 
place and before I build my new home, 
I'm going to travel around the world, 
spend a year or two at it." 

Was Jack's father still alive? Yes, he 
was alive. He had been so jealous of 
Jack's mother's love for her children. 
Maybe a little jealous, too, of the way in 
which Jack had helped support the family. 

"But he wrote me not long ago," said 
Jack. "He wrote that he understood. 
Isn't that wonderful?" 

Well, Jack's father would have some- 
thing fine about him, one thought. 

In spite of Jack's brave words and his 
brave smile, I think there is still a great 
loneliness in his soul. 

Will Jack ever marry? I don't think 
so. He has still his invalid brother to 
care for. 

"One sees too much unhappiness," he 
said. 




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Letters to the Editor 

(Continued from page 6) 



great amount of applause which has hith- 
erto been unwillingly confined and would 
instil a feeling of satisfaction in the audi- 
ence. I offer this idea to the producers of 
our moving picture for what it is worth 
to them. 

Very truly yours, 

Sam Levinkind. 



Hollywood Divorces 

HOLLYWOOD, CAL.— There is no 
question that moving pictures have a very 
vital part in influencing the morals of a 
vast number of movie fans, and the lives 
of favored actors and actresses are scruti- 
nized with great care by their admirers. 
This is rather hard on these people, but 
it is, unfortunately, the price of fame. 

Therefore we believe the mad scramble 
for divorces that is sweeping our country 
is in some measure due to the fact that 
divorces are the rule rather than the ex- 
ception in Hollywood. There they change 
their mates much as they change their 
clothes. They even forget at times, no 
doubt, just who their present husband or 
wife is. They seem to think the situation 
is a great jest. 

Because the lives of those who have be- 
come famous belong to a certain extent to 
those who have elevated them to that po- 
sition, their morals should be supervised, 
if they are not capable of looking after 
them themselves. The present standard is 
anything but high, and its demoralizing 
effect is being reflected in our courts. 
Sincerely yours, 

N. M. Elliott. 



Gl 



onous 



Gl 



ona 



NEW YORK, N. Y— For five years 
there has been one actress on the screen 
who has given us great performance after 
great performance with never a faltering 
step. 

She has had her share of poor pictures, 
but her work in those pictures has never 
been characterized by phlegmatic indiffer- 
ence. She has never allowed a mediocre 
picture to dominate her; she has domi- 
nated it, for whatever any of her pictures 
have lacked in interest and conviction, she 
has more than made up for with her mar- 
velous acting and irresistible personality. 

I speak of Gloria Swanson, that superb 
artiste. When she made "The Humming 
Bird," she gave us an unforgettable per- 
formance, which was her first potent bid 
for acting supremacy. Since then each of 
her pictures, whether drama or comedy, 
has been characterized by a performance 
notable for its depth of understanding, 
subtle interpretation and spontaneity. Her 
versatility is amazing. 

Miss Swanson has never failed to strike 
a responsive and enthusiastic chord in her 
audiences. 

Her portrayal of Sadie Thompson is the 
greatest bit of acting I ever have seen ; it 
is vivid, forceful and thrilling, a perfect 
portrayal by the greatest actress on the 
screen. 

There never has been another Glorious 
Gloria and there never will be. 
Truly yours, 

Ethel D. Sippcrly. 



Appreciation of "Old Ironsides" 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA.— May one who 
saw "Old Ironsides" be permitted to regis- 
ter an appreciation of this delightful pic- 
ture? This is a notable filming of a stir- 
ring chapter in the annals of our country. 



The action moves forward in true historic 
beat. We catch the delicate echoes of 
olden times ; we also hear the harsh note 
of that long-ago sounded by the pictur- 
esque ruffians who made the high seas 
their stage for brawling and pilfering. 
Youth's lyric beauty of expression is af- 
forded by Esther Ralston and Charles 
Farrell. Special tribute must be paid to 
Wallace Beery, who fairly revels in the 
role of "boson," and we may add that his 
audience revels with him. "Age cannot 
wither nor custom stale" this character 
actor's art as moons wax and wane. . . . 
Films featuring the famous "IT," those 
exploiting the Coney Island theme, the 
rodeo Romeo, the slinky night life, may 
boast their following, but somehow this 
picturization of American prowess on the 
maritime main stands out with a dignity 
and charm that cannot be attributed to all 
that flickers across the silversheet. 
Sincerely, 
(Mrs.) Rosivell H. Cobb. 



Movie Public Critical 

GLENCOE, ILL.— Censors or no cen- 
sors, the movies have made a big advance 
in the last few years. They give us better 
pictures, better actors, better photography 
and more capable directors. 

The movie public, during the same time, 
has grown more discriminating, therefore 
more critical. It demands the best, and in 
my opinion, receives it. (There are ex- 
ceptions, of course, to every broad stater 
ment. ) 

When I recall the flawless pictures I 
have seen, "The Volga Boatman," "Young 
April," "Seventh Heaven," "Sorrell and 
Son," "Ramona," "Ben-Hur," "The King 
of Kings," and others too numerous to 
mention, which appeal to " a variety of 
tastes, I do not feel like criticizing but ex- 
tolling an industry which has created more 
real enjoyment than any other. 

Think of the thousands, tied to their 
daily tasks, who can cross the continents, 
via the Silver Screen, to view the won- 
ders of the world and without losing their 
jobs — even, possibly, being fitted for a bet- 
ter one, while many of them pluck the 
flower of romance only from this source. 

Pictures of educational character do 
more for our children than oral instruc- ' 
tion in the schools and revive their elders' 
failing memories. 

E. E. U. 



We All Profit By Good Pictures 

NEW YORK, N. Y.— "The Ten Com- 
mandments" made a deeper and more last- 
ing impression on me than any movie I 
ever saw. We so often deplore the actions 
of youth. Advice and lecturing on the 
part of older ones seem to do but little 
good. They have to learn for themselves, 
and the place where they are most apt to 
learn life's lessons these days is in the 
moving picture show. 

This picture gave excellent Bible in- 
struction, and alongside with this showed 
the results of disobedience and how chil- 
dren's conduct would in later years be 
brought to bear upon those dearly beloved 
parents who grow dearer "each step of the 
way." 

Give us more of these good plays which 
we want our children to see and be edu- 
cated by. And not only are they good for 
youth ; we grownups can profit as well. 
Very truly yours, 

/. G. I 'an Brenner. 



118 



"Our Lady of the Steppes 

(Continued from page 35) 

he started, and the ones who joined later. 
We call the old school 'the old folks.' " 

They played "Carmencita and the Sol- 
dier," the Russian version of the Spanish 
"Carmen." "Pericola," the glamourous 
Peruvian actress of two centuries ago, so 
like "Camila, the Perichole" of Thornton 
Wilder's "The Bridge of San Luis Rey." 

"For three months in the summer I 
would go to Crimea for rest, but the other 
nine months we would be in Moscow per- 
forming every night, and in Petrograd and 
all over Russia. Then Dantchenko decided 
to give realism to opera, instead of all 
pomp and ceremony. He started the Mos- 
cow Theatre of Combined Arts. 

" 'Can you sing, Baclanova ?' he ask. 
And I say, 'Give me little time.' I go im- 
mediately to Tarian Karganova, the sing- 
ing teacher, now she gives little singing 
lessons in Paris, and in three months' time 
I sing well enough to be in the opera. 
And then all the people, when they hear 
me sing 'Fille de Madame Ango,' rush to 
Tarian and say, 'Make me sing like Bacla- 
nova.' 

"Also dancing I studied, too. From 
Mordkin, who was in Pavlova's ballet." 

Baclanova has been in America two and 
a half years. She came with the caravan 
of Moscow Art Theatre players that held 
the intelligentzia of New York enraptured. 
She came to Hollywood, but later re- 
turned to the East. The tropical climate 
was enervating to our lady of the steppes. 

"Then I get telegram from Maurice 
Gest, who has taken 'The Miracle' to Cali- 




Hommel 

Putting Baclanova on the screen has been 

nobody's task. Her beauty and ability have 

themselves turned the trick 





Marvelous New Discovery 
Makes Hair Beautifully Wavy 



The Spanish Beggar's 
Priceless Gift 

A story by Winifred Ralston 

FROM the day we started to school Charity Win- 
throp and I were called the tousled-hair twins. 
Our hair simply wouldn't behave. 

As we grew older the hated name still clung to us. 
Then Charity's family moved to Spain and I didn't 
see her again until last New Year's eve. 

A party of us had gone to the Drake Hotel for din- 
ner that night. I was ashamed of my hair. 

Horribly self-conscious, I was sitting at the table, 
scarcely touching my food, wishing I were home. It 
seemed that everyone had wonderful, lustrous, curly 
hair but me, and I felt that they were all laughing — or 
worse, pitying me behind my back. 

My eyes strayed to the dance floor and there I saw 
a beautiful girl dancing with Tom Harvey. Her eye 
caught mine and to my surprise she smiled. 

About this girl's face was a halo of golden curls. I 
think she had the most beautiful hair I ever saw. My 
face must have turned scarlet as I compared it men- 
tally with my own straggly, ugly mop. 

Of course you have guessed her identity — Charity 
Winthrop, who once had dull straight hair like mine. 

It had been five long years since I had seen her. 
But I simply couldn't wait. I blurted out — "Charity 
Winthrop — what miracle has happened to your hair? " 

She smiled and said mysteriously, "Come to my 
room and I will tell you the whole story." 

Charity tells of the beggar's gift 

" Our house in Madrid faced a little, old plaza where 
I often strolled after my siesta. 

" Miguel, the beggar, always occupied the end bench 
of the south end of the plaza. I always dropped a few 
centavos in his hat when I passed. 

"The day before I left Madrid I stopped to bid him 
goodby and pressed a gold coin in his palm. 

"'Hija mia' he said. 'You have been very kind to 
an old man. Digemelo (tell me) senorita, what it is 
your heart most desires.' 

"I laughed at the idea, then said jokingly, 'Miguel, 
my hair is straight and dull. I would have it lustrous 
and curly.' 

"'Oigame, Senorita' he said — -'Many years ago a 
Castillian prince was wedded to a Moorish beauty. 
Her hair was black and straight as an arrow. Like 
you, this lady wanted los pelos rizos (curly hair). Her 
husband offered thousands of pesos to the man who 
would fulfil her wish. The prize fell to Pedro the dro- 
gucro. He brewed a potion that converted the prin- 
cess' straight, unruly hair into a glorious mass of ring- 
let curls. 

" ' Pedro, son of the son of Pedro, has that secret to- 
day. Years ago I did him a great service. Here you 
will find him; go to him and tell your wish.' 

" I called a coche and gave the driver the address. 

"At the door of the apothecary shop, a funny old 
hawk-nosed Spaniard met me. I stammered out my 
explanation. When I finished, he vanished into his 
store, returned and handed me a bottle. 

"Terribly excited — I could hardly wait until I 
reached home. When I was in my room alone, I took 
down my hair and applied the liquid as directed. In 
a short time, the transformation which you have 
noted had taken place. 



"Come, Winifred — apply it to your own hair and 
see what it can do for you." 

When I looked into Charity's mirror I could hardly 
believe my eyes. The impossible had happened. My 
dull, straight hair had wound itself into curling ten- 
drils. My head was a mass of ringlets and waves. It 
shone with a lustre it never had before. 

You can imagine the amazement of the others in 
the party when I returned to the ballroom. Every- 
body noticed the change. I was popular. Men clus- 
tered about me. I had never been so happy. 

The next morning when I awoke I hardly dared look 
in my mirror, fearing it had all been a dream. But it 
was gloriously true. My hair was beautifully curly. 



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This offer may not be repeated. Remember, we take all the risk. 
If with "Wave-Sta" and the Wave Modellers you are not able to 
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Wavy Bob 



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CENTURY CHEMISTS 



I 



7 W. Austin Ave. M.P.31 

Chicago, 111. 

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119 



Why Did Mary 
Do It? 



Not so long ago Mary Pickford had her curls 
cut off. Why? 

The step was too radical to be meaningless. It 
was due to no whim, to no flitting fancy. 

As well might Adolphe Menjou announce his 
intention to play in westerns, Alice White be 
chosen to succeed Pola Negri, or Bull Montana 
be cast as Hamlet, as that Mary part with her 
spiral trade-marks. 

There are those who say she did it as a last des- 
perate move to induce Doug to stop smiling. Or, 
by force of sweet example, to get him to cut off 
his mustache. 

But nobody really knows. 

Yet this much may be said: When anyone does 
know, the readers of MOTION PICTURE 
MAGAZINE will, too. 

For this is the periodical devoted to the interests 
of the screen which gets the news first, gets it 
right — and spreads it broadcast. 

There are some big new features in the next — 
the October— issue of MOTION PICTURE. 
And it will be on the newsstands August 28th. 
Make a date with yourself now to be there, too — 
just to be sure that you get your copy of the 
October MOTION PICTURE. 

It's the Magazine of Authority 



fornia. He had me oonder contract. Re 
say, 'You are going to play The Nun. 
Lady Diana Manners play it one perform- 
ance and you play it next.' And I say, 
'But I have not rehearse, I do not know 
the musical score. It iss all in pantomime 
that iss harder to learn in such queeck 
notice.' 



Yes, She's an Actress 






"]y|AURiCE Gest say, 'Are you actress?' 
I say, 'Yes.' And in four days 1 
play part of The Nun. I only have four 
rehearsals, once with the entire company. 
I play it four times in Los Angeles." 

Baclanova had heard of motion pictures. 
One day she played a small role, a very 
small role and her first, in Norma Tal- 
madge's "The Dove." Then she played in 
"The Man Who Laughed" with Conrad 
Veidt at Universal. 

"And I sink motion pictures are not for 
me." 

With Maurice Gest she went to visit 
Pola Negri when the Polish actress was 
making "Hotel Imperial," directed by the 
Swede, Mauritz Stiller. 

"Mister Stiller look at me and say, 'You 
like to be in motion pictures?' I laugh. 
'They are not for me.' He say, 'You shall 
be in the Jannings picture I make.' " 

That was "The Street of Sin." She 
was in it — superlatively. 

Then with Negri in "Three Sinners." 

After that they dropped the "Olga." 

In "Forgotten Faces" it is Baclanova, 
the superb. 

"I shall stay in motion pictures maybe 
five years. Then maybe start a school. 
Or sing. They do not like their women 
old on the screen." She paused, perhaps 
thinking of that other blue-eyed Russian, 
Nazimova. There is nothing of the ego- 
tist about Baclanova. Merely a surety of 
self. A fine sense of well-being. 

Woman Best at Thirty 

" A merican women waste their time on 

"^ little things. Little parties, little 
dances, little gossip, little affairs. Woman 
should be at her best at thirty. In Russia 
it iss so. They mature slower. They save 
themselves for only the most important 
things. They keep their bodies young with 
massage, with gymnastics." 

No Hollywood parties for Baclanova. 
Her singing occupies her time off-screen, 
her home at the beach, too. 

"Have I not everything? For six 
months now I drive my own car. Soon, 
maybe in three months, I marry Nicholas 
Soussanin. I have my work. What else 
iss there to have? 

"Nicholas Soussanin, too, is Russian. 
So was my husband from whom I soon 
get a divorce. I met Nicholas in Holly- 
wood. He is actor." 

You saw him with Menjou in "Service 
for Ladies," in "Hotel Imperial," in "The 
Spotlight." 

A check home to the little Russian 
mother. Dollars changed into rubles go 
far. And Baclanova is generous. 

Our generous lady of the steppes. 



Not only does it know what it's 

talking about 

It talks about what it knows 
Which is why the most talked- 

about movie periodical among those 

who know is 

MOTION PICTURE 

"It's the Magazine of Authority." 
On the newsstands for you the 28th 
of every month. 



120 



Making Life Louiseitr 

(Continued from page 114) 
The Families Next Door 

YY/hen Louise was a little girl, her father 

" kept a small grocery store in the in- 
dustrial district of Los Angeles. Her 
name was Louise Mason then. Her 
mother worked in the store and Louise 
was alone in the tiny flat which was their 
home for nearly all of every day. She 
was a shy child who did not make friends 
with other children easily, and she amused 
herself by speculating about the other 
families in the building. 

Watching them with friendly, interested 
eyes, she gradually came to know a great 
deal about them — the motorman whose 
wife played bits in pictures to eke out the 
family income. The acrobat who was so 
tender with his sick little girl. The old 
lady whose flashily dressed young lady 
daughter came to see her sometimes in a 
gaudy car — but who never took her mother 
to her home. 

Those families meant to Louise what 
story books mean to other children. She 
has kept track of many of them and knows 
where they are and what they are doing 
today. But it was there that the trait of 
friendliness grew up in her, and it was 
then that she decided that some day she 
would be a soul-doctor for sick and be- 
wildered human beings. 

She keeps a little file of her cases. 
There are no names on the cards in her 
card index, because some stranger might 
come upon it and read things not meant 
for him to see. But she puts down a date 
or the name of a place — just a word or 
two to remind her of a particular person 
and his particular need. She must look 
up number forty-six some time soon. She 
does not wish to lose track of her patients 
or to lose touch with anyone who might 
need her. 

Sympathy, Not Sermons 

I don't want to preach at people," she 
insists. "I am not trying to reform 
anybody. But people do so need friends ! 
If you can talk things over with someone 
who understands and who is interested in 
you, it helps so much. 

"I shan't announce to the world that I 
am making a business of giving free ad- 
vice. I shall want the thing to grow of 
itself. One person who may be helped 
will send someone else who needs assist- 
ance. 

"I want to have time to study and think 
about each individual case. When I am 
working, my time is limited. I can't al- 
ways go to people when I am needed. 
After I am through with pictures, I can 
give all the time that is necessary. 

"They shall be assured that no one shall 
know about anything they tell me. I shall 
love doing it !" 

She will love doing it. And she will do 
it well. Louise is one of those women 
possessed of a tremendous maternal in- 
stinct. Her friendly wish to understand, 
her sympathetic feeling for human beings 
embraces the entire world. I think she 
feels (although she did not say so and 
probably will not like my saying it!) that 
the business of extending the helping hand 
is an individual mission for her. That she 
has been called to do it. So she must. 

Anyhow, she is Hollywood's soul-doctor. 
It is an avocation now, while her profes- 
sion is that of an actress. But it is her 
real career. And it is the one she will 
follow when her acting days are over. 



Sod [a elbeqm 

anticipates another enjoyable 
trip fyaz Union Pacific 






'«*° C <&E 












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e^/^V "Hi. 

soinif, in toy h ° fc-iD t PI «as u ^ 



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You will meet famous and inter- 
esting people on the Los Angeles 
Limited, the 63 hour, extra fare 
de luxe flyer Chicago to California. 

C. J. Collins, General Passenger Agent, Omaha, Nebr. 
Geo. R. Bierman, Gen'l Pass'r Agent, Los Angeles, Calif. 



A scene from 
"Hold 'Em Yale," 

the new De Mille 
production feature 
ing Rod La Rocque. 



UNION PACIFIC 



THE OVERLAND ROUTE 



121 





hamf>ooing this way 
gives hair Unusual Beauty 

In a few minutes time, your hair is soft, silky and 
radiant with life, gloss and lustre. Try it I — see 
how lovely; how beautiful your hair will look. 



BEAUTIFUL hair is now easily ob- 
tained. It is simply a matter of 
shampooing. 

Ordinary, old time methods, however, 
will not do. To bring out the REAL 
BEAUTY, the hair must be shampooed 
properly. 

Proper shampooing makes it soft and 
silky. It brings out all the real life and 
lustre, all the natural wave and color and 
leaves it fresh-looking, glossy and bright. 

When your hair is dry, dull and heavy, 
lifeless, stiff and gummy, and the strands 
cling together, and it feels harsh and dis- 
agreeable to the touch, it is because your 
hair has not been shampooed properly. 

While your hair must have frequent and 
regular washing to keep it beautiful, it can 
not stand the harsh effect of ordinary soaps. 
The free alkali in ordinary soaps soon dries 
the scalp, makes the hair brittle and ruins it. 

That is why thousands of women, every- 
where, now use Mulsified cocoanut oil 
shampoo. This clear, pure and entirely 
greaseless product brings out all the real 
beauty of the hair and cannot possibly injure. 
It does not dry the scalp or make the hair 
brittle, no matter how often you use it. 



Twoor three teaspoonfuls make an abun- 
dance of rich, creamy lather, which cleanses 
thoroughly and rinses out easily, removing 
every particle of dust, dirt and dandruff. 

Just Notice the Difference 

IT keeps the scalp soft and the hair fine 
and silky, bright, glossy, fresh-looking 
and easy to manage, and makes it fairly 
sparkle with new life, gloss and lustre. 

You can get Mulsified cocoanut oil sham- 
poo at any drug store or toilet goods count- 
er anywhere in the world. 
A 4-ounce bottle should last for months. 



f^TB 


\ 


lip 


p / 

hk ~~* it 


Bg&for' 





MULSIFIED COCOANUT OIL SHAMPOO 



Forecasting About 

{Continued from page 66) 

gentleman sopranos. Imagine, if you will, 
the effect of an ingenue with a booming 
voice asking a heavy, who speaks with a 
lisp, if he has no sister of his own! Yep, 
the folk of the used-to-be silent drama are 
afflicted with chills and fever. And be- 
tween the two they are dashing madly to 
voice culture schools. Aleantime, the old 
troupers with stage experience are snick- 
ering that their day has dawned. 

When Ma was a schoolgirl, the popular 
song of the day contained a snappy, up-to- 
the-minute line about "Send me a kiss by 
wire." Ask Dad, he knows. But today 
the request might well be "Send me a pho- 
tograph by wire." They've been doing it 
for three years by means of a process 
known as telephotography. But only this 
year have they succeeded in actually trans- 
mitting a motion picture from Chicago to 
New York over the telephone wires. 

A movie filmed in Chicago in the morn- 
ing was telephoned to Manhattan by noon 
and shown in Broadway theaters in the 
evening ! The negative was cut into strips 
some seven inches long for purposes of 
transmission and, of course, was re-assem- 
bled in New York. It was about a hun- 
dred feet in length, and the cost of trans- 
mission approximated sixteen hundred dol- 
lars. At present it takes a minute to tele- 
photograph an inch of negative. 

This, of course, was an experiment. But 
it was a successful one. And there is no 
doubt whatever that within a few years 
motion pictures, let us say, of the corona- 
tion of Dave Windsor as King of Eng- 
land will be shown throughout America 
on the very same day that the event takes 
place. 

Consider, if you please, the probability 
of combining telephotography, sound pic- 
tures of the Movietone type, television, 
radio and a few other modern discoveries ! 
Some are not perfected as yet. But sure 
as shooting, we'll all see the time when 
sound pictures of the then current Chinese 
revolution will be received by us in the 
projection-room with which each house 
and apartment will be equipped ! We get 
sound now over the radio. What is to pre- 
vent the transmission of pictures through 
the air? 

There's something to talk about over 
your gin and ginger ! 

The Passing of Pants-Pressers 

ETar-sighted minds, anticipating the mar- 
velous developments just across the 
movie threshold, realize that the picture 
industry is no longer a haven for pants- 
pressers, penny-arcaders or other peripa- 
tetic pinchbecks. Thus one great univer- 
sity after another is including courses on 
motion pictures in its curriculum. 

Thus far the University of Southern 
California, Columbia and Cornell offer in- 
struction on various phases of the indus- 
try. These range from photo-chemistry 
and lighting engineering to dramatic con- 
struction and direction of photoplays. The 
courses occupy the full four-year term, 
and the graduates are assured of open- 
armed reception into their chosen branches 
of the picture-making art. 

Yes, sir, the "good old days" of the 
"fillum racket" are as dead as the ancient 
jeer, "get a horse!" Now, like as not, the 
director is a doctor of psychology and a 
lot of other hard-to-spell ologics. Indeed, 
Berger, the German who directed Pola 
Negri's last American-made picture, is 
just that. And putting his knowledge of 
psychology into work, Berger introduced 
his quota of new ideas into movie-making. 



122 



One of them is that the vastness of 
many motion picture sets distracts the 
minds of the players so that their eyes 
wander hopelessly at the wrong time. 
Berger set up a large black screen behind 
his camera. On it was a white circle. And 
the actors were instructed to focus their 
eyes upon this when endeavoring to get 
that effective far-away look into their 
gaze. You may judge for yourself how 
well it worked in Pola's film, "The Lady 
from Moscow." 

Some interesting things, also, in "Ladies 
of the Mob." Things that tend to show 
the decline of the ancient whoopee action 
drammers which doubtless inspired the 
composer of that classic song about 
"Horses, Horses, Horses." Things that 
tend to show the new technique of 
direction. 

Credit William Wellman with the cour- 
age and genius to put over a difficult bit 
in a difficult way. Remember when Clara 
Bow is shot? But perhaps you haven't 
yet seen the picture. Anyway, Clara is 
shot, and Dick Arlen takes her to a physi- 
cian, who probes for the bullet. The way 
Wellman told it was through the eyes of 
the three characters. Clara's are frantic 
with the torture of the painful probing. 
Aden's are suffering in sympathy and also 
register maddest panic, while the eyes of 
the doctor are cold as the steel of his in- 
struments. The ability to treat such a 
sequence in such a way is one never-to-be- 
overcome advantage that the screen pos- 
sesses over its boastful legitimate stage 
rival. 

Effective Feetage 

As the h'Englishman said: "H'it's not 
"^ the 'eavy 'auling that 'urts the 'orse's 
'ooves, but the 'araraer, 'ammer, 'ammer 
h'on the 'ard 'ighway !" And the ham- 
mer, hammer, hammer of horses' hooves 
has been more than once effectively pho- 
tographed. The hooves of humans, too. 
Do you recall that short subject, "A Dog's 
Tale," in which the entire story was told 
with shots of feet? Wellman uses the 
same idea in another thrill sequence of his 
underworld film. It portrays the march 
of a condemned man from his death-house 
cell, through the little green door, to the 
chair. Just the feet of the culprit — of the 
priest — of the warden — of the witnesses — 
of the executioner. Just suggestion, that's 
all. And far more powerful because it 
permits each of us to conjure up in his 
own imagination the thoughts and emo- 
tions of the characters. 

More Blood! More Blood! 

P"or some reason or other, the decree 
seems to have gone forth that comedy 
is passe. Rich, red blood is the prescribed 
movie diet. The comics of the season past 
are being cast in melodramatic roles. 
You'll see Wallace Beery not worrying in 
the least about falling trousers, but fully 
intent on cutting himself a piece of throat. 
Wouldn't be surprised to see Raymond 
Hatton competing with George Bancroft 
in some gunman part. And, who can tell, 
Ben Turpin's eyes may suddenly take on 
a sinister aspect in a .portrayal of some 
arch fiend whose villainies will make Dr. 
Caligari seem like one of the Happiness 
Boys ! 

So there you have it. Forward to sound, 
telephotography, television. Backward to 
thrillers. It's a funny business, this try- 
ing to provide the public with entertain- 
ment. But the forward steps are more 
numerous than the backward ones. And 
so the movie world does move. Forward ! 



TRE-JUR 

face powder and new compacts 



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— as alluring as mystery — with a strange, 
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You will find it in a new series of Tre-Jur's 
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new "Thinest", no deeper than a dollar (and 
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Did you know that Tre-Jur's 
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Two powders, a heavy and a light, pre-blended 
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A powder that never cakes or flakes — a 
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Pat a puff of Tre-Jur's pre-blended powder on 
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Note how evenly, how delicately it satinizes 
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This unique powder and all Tre- Jur Toiletries, 
in both Charvai and Joli Memoire fragrances, 
are sold at leading stores everywhere. 




Joli Memoire 
Face Powder 



"Thinest" W 
Compact 




House of Tre-Jur, Inc., Paris and New York. 



50c 

"Little One" Compact 
123 



*> 



^ of Fas«o„ 

O^ for / < 



£ 



Today more and more, 
Hollywood and film 
fashions are influencing 
women in the selection 
of distinctive clothes, 
possessing that indi- 
vidualistic touch which 
is chic. 




% 



The fashionable film 
favorites of Holly- 
wood — its brilliant 
stars and their support- 
ing casts — are rapidly 
creating a new clothes 
consciousness 
America. 



in 



'F you want to attain the ultimate 
chic — the creative note 



in 



^m which characterizes Hollywood 
{* m fashions— you will require the 
^"-^ guidance of a fashion magazine 

which has an eye on both Paris and 
Hollywood. Fashionable Dress is the 
only fashion magazine which has recog- 
nized the importance of this wondrous 
development in the past few years. 
Fashionable Dress guides unerringly in 
the selection of correct styles. Its pages 
present only models approved of in the 
current mode or glimpsed on the horizon 
of Tomorrow. The very frock which 
your favorite actress wears may be yours 



even before the photoplay is shown, for 
often advance styles become current in 
the course of a picture's production. 

Fashionable Dress presents in infinite 
variety frocks, coats, hats, shoes and 
accessories of distinctive smartness and 
practical utility. Timely hints on 
fabrics, furs, colors, hosiery and lingerie 
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Invaluable hints are offered monthly on 
the care of the skin, hair and hands. In 
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can enjoy their benefits. 



FILL IN AND MAIL THE COUPON NOW! 



FASHIONABLE DRESS, 250 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Enclosed please find $1 for which please send me FASHIONABLE DRESS for 5 months, be- 
ginning with the issue. 

Name • 



Street. 
City.. 



State. 

OOOD FOH A MMITKD TIMB ONJ.Y 



124 



EDWAKD LANGBK PRINTING CO., INI 
JAMAICA, NEW YOItK CITY. 



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wYl 



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: A 



K 



Photograph by Alfred 
Cheney Johnson show- 
ing how Miss Hopper 
looks today. 



Complete Beauty Outfit 

Containing Every 
Beauty Need 



► \xiY\ 



,7) 



rvovi 



att\_ 



^ 



5» 1=^3 



IS. 



Mail this special-offer coupon at once to Edna 

Wallace Hopper, 536 Lake Shore Drive, 

Chicago — enclosing 50c (stamps accepted) for 

liberal trial sizes of all seven of these beauty 

aids, Miss Hopper's own beauty book, also 

certificate good for 50c tube of Quindent 

toothpaste. 

Name 

Street 

P. 9-M.P.M. 



An Invitation 

by Edna Wallace Hopper 

rOU'VE heard of this woman who has been a stage 
beauty over forty years, and of the French beauty 
formulas that have kept her beautiful for a lifetime. 
But you never have had so wonderful an offer as she 
makes you here! 

This is your golden opportunity to have your own beauty 
box of Edna Wallace Hopper's own beauty requisites. Not 
just a collection of stingy samples of commercial cosmetics, 
but liberal quantities of seven scientific aids to 
beauty culture; the self-same things this famous 
beauty spent years in searching out; the 
secrets once known only in France. 

Look at the photograph of Miss Hopper — taken this 
year. At a grandmother's age, she still looks like a flapper. 
That's what the right beauty aids can do; what ordinary 
tallow creams and crude clays and starchy powders can 
never accomplish. Try these seven aids, in generous quan- 
tities; enough powder for six weeks, all in decorative box 
suitable for travel or home use; for coupon and only 50c. 



Full-sized packages would 
cost you over four dollars! 

Certificate for full fifty-cent tube of 

exquisite Quindent toothpaste will 

be included, so this week-end beauty 

case really costs you nothing! 



S< \Y \\l ( 




//our whole Appearance 

* depends upon "four Hair 



FORTUNATELY, beautiful 
hair is now easily obtained. 
You can have hair that is 
charming and attractive if you 
simply shampoo it properly. 

Proper shampooing is what 
makes your hair soft, silky, and 
beautiful. It brings out all the real life and 
histre, all the natural wave and color and 
leaves it fresh-looking, glossy and bright. 

When your hair is dry, dull and heavy, 
lifeless, stiff and gummy, and the strands 
cling together, and it feels harsh and dis- 
agreeable to the touch, it is because your 
hair has not been shampooed properly. 

While your hair must have frequent and 
regular washing to keep it beautiful, it can- 
not stand the harsh effect of ordinary soaps. 
The free alkali in ordinary soaps soon dries 
the scalp, makes the hair brittle and ruins it. 

That is why thousands of women, every- 
where, now use Mulsified cocoanut oil sham- 
poo. This clear, pure and entirely greaseless 
product brings out all the real beauty of the 
hair and cannot possibly injure. It does not 
dry the scalp or make the hair brittle, no 
matter how often you use it. 



Without beautiful, well-kept hair, you can never be really 
attractive. Soft, silky hair radiates loveliness and is the 
most ALLURING CHARM any woman can possess. 
It makes the plainest features appear soft and sweet. 
Fortunately, beautiful hair is now easily obtained. 



Tf you want to see how really beautiful you 
can make your hair look, just follow this 
simple method. 

First, wet the hair and scalp in clear, warm 
water. Then apply a little Mulsified cocoa- 
nut oil shampoo, rubbing it in thoroughly 
all over the scalp, and all through the hair. 

Two or three teaspoonfuls makes an abun- 
dance of rich, creamy lather, which cleanses 
thoroughly and rinses out easily, removing 
every particle of dust, dirt and dandruff. 

Just Notice the Difference 

YOU will notice the difference in your hair 
even before it is dry, for it will be delight- 
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feel loose, fluffy and light to the touch. 

If you want to always be remembered for 
your beautiful, well-kept hair, make it a rule 



to set a certain day each week for a 
Mulsified cocoanut oil shampoo. 
This regular weekly shampooing 
will keep the scalp soft and the hair 
fine and silky, bright, glossy, fresh- 
looking and easy to manage — and 
make it fairly sparkle with new 
life, gloss and lustre. 

You can get Mulsified cocoanut oil sham- 
poo at any drug store or toilet goods counter. 
A 4-ounce bottle should last for months. 




MULSIFIED COCOANUT OIL SHAMPOO 




Filling their Shoes 
arvBids Good bveto Girlhood 



So ©ood to Their Mothers 
Babv Stars Learn Talkie-Talk 




SEND THIS COUPON 

to Edna Wallace Hopper 

536 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, III. 

with 10 cents for Sample of 

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to prove to yourself what 
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FREE! 



I will also send you a 
sample of my Youth 
Cream and Youth Powder 
three samples in all. 



Name 



)W you can have the thrill of a lovely, natural- 
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stage demands it. Starring as a flapper in my 
sixties is a startling role. So whatever else I do 
I must look young. And one of my greatest 
assets is the sheen of my hair. It simply glows 
with life. In fact, the first comments my audiences 
make are about my hair. 
Send this coupon and ten cents for a sample of 

WAVE AND SHEEN 

to make your hair 

Ware — Scintillate — Attract 

I will enclose with it samples of my Youth Cream 
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a 







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\ ' 




^\ WILLIAM FOX presents^ */>> 




^> 



M ©V I E T #M 12 




&?tf /to #£!#// Ztetf. to SEE!! 



IT'S coming your way! Another Fox 
Masterpiece— FAZIL! A picture with an enthralling 
story dramatically narrated by Howard Hawks. 

East loves West and West loves East.. Greta Nissen 
and Charles Farrell. See these two daring lovers, 
who first find themselves through the song of a 
Venetian gondolier and then lose themselves in the 
maze of reckless romance. Follow them through the 
gay Western World— the mysterious East. See Her 
conquer over His harem. See Him undecided be- 
tween breaking Her heart and breaking His laws! 
Then one of the greatest climaxes in moving picture 
history — the final scene beside a desert oasis — 
where Greta Nissen will make you forget Cleopatra! 



FAZIL is indeed an amazing picture to see! And 
— it is also an amazing picture to HEAR! In FAZIL 
you will hear that astonishing movie miracle — FOX 
MOVIETONE. It puts SOUND into movies— real- 
istic, true-to-life sound! In FAZIL you hear the gon- 
dolier sing his Venetian Song of Love. You hear the 
voices of the desert. You hear a full symphony or- 
chestra, as though you were sitting in a great mov- 
ing picture cathedral on Broadway. Fox Movietone 
doubles your movie fun. You won't believe your own 
ears! It's as true to your ears as it is to your eyes 
—because the SOUND, like the scene, is PHOTO- 
GRAPHED. Watch for Fox Movietone in your town 
— See a Fox Movietone, you'll hear a great show! 



F#X M®X\\lT®Sll-The Sound and Sight Sensation 



LOVE GAVE HIM COURAGE 

FOR HIS DEATH DEFYING SLIDE 

WILLIAM HAINES 



in 



EXCESS BAGGAGE 

with Josephine Dunn and Ricardo Cortez 

A James Cruze Production — Based on the play by John 
McGowan — Continuity by Frances Marion— A Metro- 
Goldwyn 'Mayer Picture — Directed by James Cruze 




SEE — REMEMBER 
AND CASH IN 

Mighty few people can remember what 
they've seen after it's all over. You can test 
your own memory — and possibly win a 
prize, by answering these five questions. To 
the man sending in the best answers I'll 
give $50 in cash and the domino I wear in 
my new picture, "Excess Baggage." To the 
lady sending in the best answers I'll also 
give $50, and Miss Dunn, who plays op- 
posite me, will give the make-up kit she 
used in the back stage scenes. In addition I 
will send autographed photographs for the 
fifty next best answers. 



irt/a^^" i* 



<£ZsCt^<, 



BILL HAINES' 
FIVE QUESTIONS 

1 What new M-G-M picture has a South Sea Island 
-*- setting? 

O What two Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer World Tours 
** are now in progress? 

"1 What does "continuity" mean in motion picture 
J making? 

4 In 75 words or less tell who your favorite M-G-M 
director is and why. 
C Which M-G-M actress is called the screen's lead- 
— ing comedienne and name two comedies in which 
she has played? 

Write your answers on one side of a single sheet 
of paper and mail to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1542 
Broadway, New York. All answers must be received 
by October 15th. Winners' names will be published 
in a later issue of this magazine. 

Note: If you do not attend pictures yourself you may 
question your friends or consult motion picture 
magazines. In event of ties, each tying contestant will 
be awarded a prize identical in character with that 
tied for. 

Winners of John Gilbert Contest 

Don F. Russell, Newburyport, Mass. 

Mrs. Belle McCain, Dallas, Texas 




a ME 




YOU'LL laugh — you'll cry— 

YOU'LL thrill to "Excess Baggage" 

ON the screen 

AS thousands did on the Broadway stage. 

AND it's only the first 

OF Metro-Gold wyn-M ay er's big pictures 

FOR your enjoyment this season. 



Ask your theatre manager when you can 
see the new M-G-M pictures: William 
Haines in "Excess Baggage" — Lon Chaney 
in "While the City Sleeps"— "Our Danc- 
ing Daughters" with Joan Crawford — 
Buster Keaton in "The Camera Man" 
-"The Bellamy Trial." 





RAMON 
NAVARRO 









TIM 


CODY & 


BUSTER 


DANE & 


LILLIAN 


NORMA 


McCOY 


PRINGLE 


KEATON 


ARTHUR 


GISH 


SHEARER 



JLDWYN-MAYER picture 



"More Stars than there are in Heaven" 







Volume XXXVI, No. 3 




October, 1928 



Features in This Issue 



Cover Portrait, Dorothy Devore. 



. Marland Stone 



Filling Their Shoes . : Herbert Cruikshank 28 

The Hollywoods are full of persistent pretenders to the thrones of the established great 



A Kid that Looks Like a Gun 

Or two that look like Richard Barlhelmess twice: Mrs. McQuoid can find them 



.Lamar Trotti 31 
.Burt Knight 33 



The Screenless Screen 

[ This is one marvel that Clarence Brown, wizard of profits and prophesies, foresees clearly 

So Good to Their Mothers! Gladys Hall 34 

Pampering parents is Hollywood' s grealesls' greatest weakness 

Your Neighbor Says— Walter Ramsey 40 

Betsy Musser, of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, tells what she thinks of Hollywood and the chances of girls who want to go there 



Laugh that Off 

Donald Reed's sense of humor has reconciled him to Hollywood 



Dorothy Manners 42 
. . . Cedric Belfrage 44 



Baby Stars Learn Talkie-Talk ! 

All the movie kiddies are learning the fascinating new word game 

Nijinska Dances Alone Herbert Cruikshank 49 

Once an intimate of empresses, she is in Hollywood a magnificent nonentity 

The Star-Diggers Gladys Hall 50 

Samuel Goldwyn chooses women trained to please men 

Hellywood Walter Ramsey 52 

People think that should be the town's name before they see it 

A Cynic of the Cinema Dorothy Manners 55 

William K. Howard believes in Santa Claus with reservations 

Mary Bids Goodbye to Curlhood Dorothy Calhoun 59 

Miss Pickford uses scissors to sign her Declaration of Independence 

It for the Itless Gladys Hall 64 

This is Howard Greer's mission in life. That, and making lily women Illier 

In Love and Incog Dunham Thorp 67 

Because they were the one, Norma Shearer and Irving Thalberg chose to remain the other 

Leaves from a Lady's Diary Faith Service 68 

Ruth Roland's diary proves that virtue is a gilt-edged investment 

Why Movies Go Wrong Cedric Belfrage 71 

Technical directors are allowed neither to be technical nor to direct 

Gulliver Travels : Mary Bartol 76 

Dorothy's young, Dorothy's pretty, but Dorothy doesn't want to be itly 



Colin J. Cruickshank, Art Director 



Dorothy Donnell Calhoun, Western Editor 



Motion Picture Magazine is published monthly at Paramount Building, 1501 Broadway, New York City, 
N Y., by Motion Picture Publications, Inc. Entry for transfer as second class mailer from the Post Office 
at' Jamaica, N. Y., to Chicago, III., under the act of March 3rd, 1870, is pending. Printed in U. S. A. Copy- 
right 1028 by Motion Picture Publications, Inc. Single copy 25c. Subscriptions for U. S., its possessions, 
and Mexico $^.50 a year. Canada $3.00, Foreign Countries $3.30. European Age7ils, Atlas Publishing Com- 
pany, 18 Bride Lane, London. E. C. 4. George Kent Shuler, Pres. and Treas., Duncan A. Dobie, Jr., Vice Pres., 
Murray C. Bernays, Sec'y. 




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FIFTEEN-DOLLAR LETTER 

The Crime Wave 

WAXAHACHIE, TEXAS — Have the 
movies gone crime picture mad? 

The crook play theme can be overdone, 
both in treatment and in number of plots 
given over to such a subject. Danger lurks 
therein. 

Is it necessary that we methodically steep 
the show-going public's mind in thoughts of ■ 
lawlessness — murder — assault? Surely this 
excess is not wholesome, particularly for the 
children who attend cinema performances. 

While we would not have the motion pic- 
ture flaunt the lie that life is a beautiful 
path of roses, with never a thorn to pain the 
heart and never an evil deed to change a 
destiny, at the same time we realize that a 
trend toward picturing the seamy side of life 
almost to the exclusion of the good and 
beautiful is not a good influence. 

What the Good Book says about "As a 
man thinketh" strikes home. It is not well 
for one to have too much before his mind's 
eye scenes of deviltry. Anyway, why not hit 
the happy medium — fortunately just what 
life usually does — and mingle the sweet and 
the bitter? 

When the cinema balances are drawn 
down far on the side of the sordid, it is time 
for an adjustment. 

Sincerely, 

Flo\d Caseholt. 



satisfaction of the "powers that be." At 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, we watched an 
actor of prominence work for almost an 
entire afternoon until the desired expression 
was registered. 

At Universal, we spent another afternoon, 
watching a banquet scene, employing a large 
number of extras, being made for an aviation 
comedy which has recently been released. 
From early afternoon, until hunger recalled 
us back to Hollywood, the diners remained 
seated at the banquet table, while the scene 
was taken and retaken, and mechanical 
difficulties taken care of in the meantime. 
It appears to be a glamourous life, but it 
evidently has its monotonous and tiresome 
moments. 

Sincerely, 

Marie R. Barnes. 



TEN-DOLLAR LETTER 
Not a Bed of Roses 

DAYTON, OHIO— Since my recent visit 
to several of the leading studios in California, 
where I witnessed movies in the making, mo- 
tion pictures 
have been twice 
as fascinating to 
me as formerly. 
Prior to my vis- 
it to the capital 
of Filmland, an 
evening spent at 
the movies was 
an enjoyable ex- 
perience, but I 
realize now that 
I did not prop- 
erly appreciate 
all the effort put 
forth in making 
a picture. 

When one 
views a picture 
in its final state 
of perfection, it 
is difficult to 
realize that cer- 
tain scenes have 
been done over 
and over again 
to the entire 



FIVE-DOLLAR LETTER 

To Talk or Not to Talk 

PHILADELPHIA, PA.— No, no, no and 
again NO! We do not want "talking" pic- 
tures! We go to the movies to relax — to sit 
in a nice, comfortable seat in a dark, silent 
theater and watch the antics of Charlie and 
Kate; the conflicts, struggles, passions of 
John and Mary. We go to the movies to be 
entertained and amused without any effort 
on our part; to rest; not to think or use any 
mental energy. And to listen to conversation 
requires mental effort which destroys the 
very effect the movies are supposed to pro- 
duce. And as one movie manager said — 
there is quite enough conversation in the 
movie theater without the Vitaphone! 

The legitimate theater is the place for 
talking actors. Leave them there! We 
don't want nor need them in the movies! 

Sincerely, 

A.L. 



Prizes for Best Letters 

Each month Motion Picture Maga- 
zine will award cash prizes for the three 
best letters published. Fifteen dollars 
will be paid for the best letter, ten dol- 
lars for the second best, and five dollars 
for the third. If more than one letter is 
considered of equal merit, the full amount 
of the prize will go to each writer. 

So, if you've been entertaining any 
ideas about the movies and the stars, con- 
fine yourself to about 200 words or less, 
and let's know what's on your mind. 
Anonymous communications will not be 
considered and no letters will be re- 
turned. Sign your full name and ad- 
dress. We will use only initials if re- 
quested. Address: Letters to the Editor, 
Motion Picture Magazine, Paramount 
Building, 1501 Broadway, New York City. 



Fred Niblo 
is Guilty 

LOS ANGE- 
LES, CAL.— -I 
don't know who 
directed " The 
Enemy" and I 
don't particular- 
ly care, but who- 
ever he is, he 
understands 
human nature 
and human 
weaknesses 
(witness the lit- 
tlechildrenplay- 
i n g soldier 
while the elders 
discuss the abo- 
lition of war) 
and further- 

(Coniinued on 
page 114) 






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Priceless New Discovery 

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Indianapolis, Ind. 



Remarkable Book on Hair Sent FREE 

^^_^_ ^ ^^ ^M— ^k ^m\ ^^>»»^ BLUD-RUB MFG. CO., Dept. M-90, Indianapolis, Ind. 

I ■ ■ Bf ^ ^ B^^kk '' Jfcfr'^** 15 ^:^ Please mail me, without obligation, a free copj of the book — "What You 

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131 LlLl M\U*J 4;^ 

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7 



1 



Newest Style Spe cials 
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\ 



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ELMER RICH ARDS CO, ^ 
2787 West 35th St., Chicago 




See Opposite Page 




Montns 

pay 





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All-Wool 
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a 
month 




(Check Garment Wanted) 

I — |No.C-25F 



All-Wool 
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for Coupon 



□ 
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Broadcloth 

$1.00 with coupon, 
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Nn f-2fiF "Lamdil 
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Nrt r 97 F Broadcloth 
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Her Pretty Hair 

How does she keep it 
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Her secret lies in proper shampooing. Not 
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THIS MAN CAN READ 
YOl/fi MIND/y^\ 



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M. P. "CALOSTRO" Box 76 

Washington Bridge Station 

NEW YORK C3TY, N.Y- 



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Drawer V-l, Dept. M, 

Hollywood, Calif. 




By MARION MARTONE 



Adoree, Renee — recently completed Tide of Empire 
. —Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, 
Cal. 

Arlen.Richard — playing in Dirigible — Paramount 
Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Armstrong, Robert — playing in Show Folks — ■ 
Pathe-De Mille Studio, Culver City, Cal. 

Astor, Mary — playing in Dry Martini — Fox 
Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Asther, Nils — recently completed The Cardboard 
Lover — Metro-Goldwyn-Maver Studios, Culver Citv, 

Cal. 

* * * 

Baclanova, Olga — playing in Docks of New York — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Bancroft, George — playing in Docks of New 
York — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Banky, Vilma — playing in The Awakening — ■ 
Samuel Goldwyn Productions, De Mille Studios, 
Culver City, Cal. 

Barrymore, John — recently completed Tempest— 
United Artists Studios, 1041 N. Formosa Ave., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Barrymore, Lionel — playing in Alias Jimmy Val- 
entine — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver Citv, 
Cal. 

Barthelmess, Richard — playing in Scarlet Seas 
— First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Basquette, Lina — playing in Sliow Folks — Pathe- 
De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Beery, Noah — recently completed Noah's Ark — 
Warner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Beery, Wallace — playing in Beggars of Life — Par- 
amount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Bell, Rex — playing in The Girl-Shy Cowboy — Fox 
Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Bellamy, Madge — playing in Mother Kncnvs Best 
— Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Blue, Monte — playing in Conquest — Warner Bros. 
Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

Boles, John — playing in The Last Warning — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Borden, Olive — playing in Gang War — FBO 
Studios, 780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Bow, Clara — playing in The Fleet's In — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Boyd, William — playing in The Love Song — 
United Artists Studios, 1041 No. Formosa Ave., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Brent, Evelyn — playing in Interference — Caddo 
Productions, Hollywood, Cal. 

Brian, Mary — playing in Just Twenty-One — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Bronson, Betty — playing in The Singi7ig Fool — 
Warner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Brook, Clive — playing in Interference — Paramount 
Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Brooks, Louise — playing in The Canary Murder 
Case — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Brown, Johnny Mack — playing in A Woman of 
Affairs — Metro-Goldwvn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, 

Cal. 

* * * 

Carol, Sue — playing in Captain Swagger — Pathe- 
De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Carroll, Nancy — recently completed The Water 
Hole — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Chandler, Lane — playing in Dirigible — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Chaney, Lon — playing in West of Zanzibar — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Chaplin, Charles — recently completed The Circus 
— Charles Chaplin Studios, 1420 La Brea Ave., Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Cody, Lew — playing] in A Single Man — Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Collier, Jr., William — recently completed Tide of 
Empire — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. 

Colman, Ronald — playing in The Rescue — 
Samuel Goldwyn Productions, De Mille Studios, 
Culver City, Cal. 

Compson, Betty — playing in The Barker — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 



Conklin, Chester — recently completed Varsity — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Cooper, Gary — playing in The Shopworn Angel — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Costello, Dolores — plaving in The Redeeming Sin 
—Warner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Costello, Helene — plaving in The Midnight Taxi 
—Warner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Crawford, Joan — recently completedFour Walls— 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

* * * 

Damita, Lili — playing in The Rescue — Samuel 
Goldwyn Productions — De Mille Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. 

Dane, Karl — playing in Alias Jimmy Valentin,- — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Daniels, Bebe — playing in Take Me Home — Par- 
amount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Davies, Marion — recently completed The Card- 
boardLover — Metro-Goldwyn-Maver Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. 

Del Rio, Dolores — playing in Revenge — United Ar- 
tists Studios, 1041 No. Formosa Ave., Hollywood.Cal. 

Denny, Reginald — playing in The Xigiil Bird — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

D'Arcy, Roy — playing in The Last Warning — Uni- 
versal Studios, L T niversal City, Cal. 

Dawson, Doris — playing in Do Your Duty — -First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

De Putti, Lya — playing in The Scarlet Lady — Co- 
lumbia Pictures Corp., 1408 Gower St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Dix, Richard — playing in Moran of the Marines — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Dove, Billie — playing in The Night Watch — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Dunn, Josephine — playing in The Singing Fool — 
Warner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Duryea, George — plaving in Marked Money — 

Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

* * * 

Fairbanks, Douglas — playing in The Man with 
the Iron Mask — Pickford-Fairbanks Studios, 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Farrell, Charles — playing in Backwash — Fox Stu- 
dios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Fawcett, George — playing in The Mask of the 
Devil — Metro-Goldwyn-Maver Studios, Culver City, 
Cal. 

Fazenda, Louise — playing in Noah's Ark — War- 
ner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Ferris, Audrey — playing in The Little Wildcat — 
Warner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Foxe, Earle — playing in None But the Brave — Fox 

Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

* * * 

Gaynor, Janet — recently completed The 4 Devils 
— Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Garbo, Greta — playing in A Woman of Affairs — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Gibson, Hoot — playing in Riding for Fame — 
Universal Studios, Universal City. Cal. 

Gilbert, John — playing in A Woman of Affairs — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Grant, Lawrence — recently completed The 
Woman from Moscow — Paramount Studios, 5451 
Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Gray, Lawrence — playing in Oh Kay! — First Na- 
tional Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Griffith, Corinne — playing in Outcast — First 

National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

* * * 

Haines, William — playing in Alias Jimmy ~i'al- 
enline — Metro-Goldwvn-Maver Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. 

Hale, Alan — playing in Marked Money — Pathe- 
De Mille Studios. Culver City, Cal. 

Hall, James — playing in The Fleet's In — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 
Hamilton, Neil — playing in Take Me Home — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

(Coyitinued on page 12) 



10 




Ill§ RUIN OR - 




UIR DISGRACE? 



~ which would 

you choose? 

Sudden lights in the sea's darkness 

A shot. — Confusion. — A giant dread- 
naught sinking 

A brave commander courtmartialled for 
neglect of duty. 

Only one fact that can prove his inno- 
cence And only the woman he loves 

can prove that fact. 

Only one place where she could have 
gained the knowledge that will free her 
husband..... And that place the cabin of 
Lieutenant D'Artelle! 

Facing a hundred piercing eyes that even 
her thrilling loveliness cannot soften 

A woman alone among vindictive 

men in the merciless high naval court 




Trembling — nerve-torn, in the ter- 
rible hush that awaits her answer! 

One word — and her husband goes to 
disgrace and ruin — 

Another— and she is a woman to be for- 
ever scorned! 

With two such fates in the balance, what 
would your answer be? 

Decide for yourself. — Then see the un- 
expected outcome of this suspense-filled 
situation in "the night watch", one of 
the tensest stories ever screened, with the 
famous American Beauty, billie dove. 

Presented by Richard A. Rowland and 
directed by Alexander Korda, it is a sam- 
ple of the 50 better -than -ever pictures 
coming from first national this year. 



BIUIE DOVE 



in 




A Hut national Picture 

Takes the Guesswork Out of "Going to the Movies" 



Q NIGHT WATCH 



11 



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-IN 90 DAYS! 

7 Play anything— jazz to classical! Even it 
f\. Y ou know nothing about piano music— 
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1109 Hunter Building 

Chicago, III. 



In the Starry Kingdom 



(Continued from page 10) 



Haver, Phyllis — plaving in Office Scandal — Pathe- 
De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Hersholt, Jean — playing in The Girl on the Barge — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Hines, Johnny — playing in The Wright Idea — 
Tec-Art Studios, 5350 Melrose Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Holt, Jack — recently completed The Water Hole — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, 

Cal. 

Hoxie, Jack — playing in Men of Daring — Univer- 
sal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Hughes, Lloyd — recently completed Heart to 
Heart — First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Hyams, Leila — playing in Alias Jimmy Valentine 
— Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



Jannings, Emil — playing in Sins of the Fathers — 
Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Jolson, Al — playing in The Singing Fool— Warner 
Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

Joy, Leatrice — recently completed The Bellamy 
Trial — Metro-Goldwvn-Maver Studios, Culver City, 
Cal. 



K 

Cal. 



eaton, Buster — playing in The Cameraman — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, 

Kent, Barbara — recently completed The Shake- 
down — Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Kent, Larry — playing in The Haunted House — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Kenyon, Doris — recently completed The Hawk's 
Nest — First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Kerry, Norman — recently completed The Woman 
From Moscow — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon 
St., Hollywood, Cal. 



T angdon, 



Harry — playing in Heart Trouble — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Lake, Arthur — playing in Harold of Hollywood — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

La Plante, Laura — playing in TheLasl Warning — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

La Rocque, Rod — playing in Captain Swagger — 
Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Lloyd, Harold — recently completed Speedy — 
Harold Lloyd Productions, 1040 Las Palmas Ave., 
Hollvwood, Cal. 

Loff, Jeannette — playing in Annapolis — Pathe- 
De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Logan, Jacqueline — plaving in The Spieler — 
Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Lorraine, Louise — playing in The Wright Idea — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Lowe, Edmund — playing in Outcast — First Na- 
tional Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Loy, Myrna — playing in State Street Sadie — War- 
ner Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

Luden, Jack — playing in Sins of the Fathers — Par- 
amount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 



MacDonald, Farrell — playing in Riley, the Cop — 
Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

MacGregor, Malcolm — playing in The Girl on the 
Barge — Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Mackaill, Dorothy — playing in Waterfront — First 
National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Maynard, Ken — playing in Cheyenne — First Na- 
tional Studios. Burbank, Cal. 

McAvoy, May — plaving in The Terror — Warner 
Bros. Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

McCoy, 1 im — playing in Sioux Blood — Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

McLaglen, Victor — playing in The River Pirate — 
Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Meighan, Thomas — playing in The Mating Call 
— Caddo Productions, Hollywood, Cal. 

Moore, Colleen — recently completed Oh Kay! — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Moran, Lois — playing in Fog — Fox Studios, 1401 
No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Moreno, Antonio — plaving in The Midnight Taxi 
—Warner Bros. Studios, 5~842 Sunset Blvd., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Morton, Charles — playing in None But the Brave 
— Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Mulhall, Jack — playing in Waterfront — First Na- 
tional Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Murray, Charles — playing in Do Your Duty — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Murray, James — playing in The Shakedown — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 



N 

Cal. 



agel, Conrad — playing in War in the Dark — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, 



Negri, Pola — recently completed The Woman 
From Moscow — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon 
St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Nilsson, Anna Q. — recently completed The Whip 
— First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Nissen, Greta — recently completed The Butter and 
Egg Man— First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 



Nixon. Marian — recently completed Out of Iht 
Ruins — First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Norton, Barry — playing in Mother Knows Best — 
Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Novarro, Ramon — playing in Gold Braid — Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Nolan, Mary — playing in West of Zanzibar — Met- 
ro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Nugent, Eddie — playing in Cold Braid — Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



O'Brien, George — plaving in Fog — Fox Studios, 
1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 
O'Neil, Sally — playing in The Girl on the Barge — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Oland, Warner — recently completed Stand and 
Deliver — Pathe-De Mille Productions, Culver City. 
Cal. 

Olmstead, Gertrude — plaving in The Hit of the 
Shctv—FBO Studios, 780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 



Page, Anita — playing in Gold Braid — Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 
Philbin, Mary — playing in Forbidden Love — Uni- 
versal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Pickford, Mary — recently completed My Best 
Girl — Pickford-Fairbanks Studios, Hollywood, Cal. 
Powell, William — playing in The Canary Murder 
Case — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Holly- 
wood, Cal. 

Prevost, Marie— recenllv completed The Godless 
Girl— Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 
Pringle, Aileen — playing in A Single Man — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer "Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



Ralston, Esther — playing in The Case of Lena 
Smith — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Ralston, Jobyna — plaving in The Night Flyer — 
Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Ray, Charles — recently completed The Garden of 
Eden — United Artists Studios, Hollywood, Cal. 

Rich, Irene — plaving in Ned Mi Cobb's Daugliti-r — 
Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Roberts, Theodore — playing in The Mask of the 
Devil — Metro-Goldwvn-Maver Studios, Culver City. 
Cal. 

Rogers, Charles (Buddy) — playing in Just 
Twenty-One — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon 
St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Rubens, Alma — playing in The Mask of the Devil 
— Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 



Schildkraut, Rudolph — recently completed Tenth 
Avenue — Pathe-De Mille Studios, Culver City, 
Cal. 

Sebastian, Dorothy — playing in A Woman of 
Affairs — Metro-Goldwvn-Maver Studios, Culver 
City, Cal. 

Shearer, Norma — pla>ing in The Little Angel — 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Culver City, Cal. 

Sills, Milton — playing in Hard Rock — First 
National Studio?, Burbank, Cal. 

Steele, Bob — playing in Lighlniyig Speed — FBO 
Studios, 780 Gower St , Hollywood, Cal. 

Stuart, Nick — playing in Chasing Through Europe 
— Fox Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Swanson, Gloria — plaving in The Swamp — 
FBO Studios, 780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 



Talmadge, Norma — recently completed The 
Woman Disputed — United Artists Studios, 1041 
No. Formosa Ave., Hollywood, Cal. 

Taylor, Ruth — playing in The Canary Murder 
Case — Paramount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., 
Hollywood, Cal. 

Thomson, Fred — playing in Kit Carson — Para- 
mount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 

Todd, Thelma — playing in 7 he Haunted House — 
First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Tryon, Glenn — recently completed The Kid's 
Clever — Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Tyler, Tom — playing in Gun Law — FBO Studios, 
780 Gower St., Hollywood, Cal. 



Valli, Virginia — playing in The Escape — Fox 
Studios, 1401 No. Western Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal. 

Varconi. Victor — recently completed The Divine 
Lady — First National Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Velez, Lupe — playing in The Love Song — United 
Artists Studios, 1041 No. Formosa Ave., Hollywood, 
Cal, 

Veidt, Conrad — playing in The Play Goes On — 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

Vidor, Florence — playing in Divorce Bound — Par- 
amount Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 



Warner, H. B. — playing in Conquest — Warner Bros. 
Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 
White, Alice — playing in Show Girl — First Na- 
tional Studios, Burbank, Cal. 

Wilson, Lois — plaving in Conquest — Warner Bros. 
Studios, 5842 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

Wray, Fay — playing in Dirigible — Paramount 
Studios, 5451 Marathon St., Hollywood, Cal. 



'What could be easier ! 



! 




Play any instrument 

in a few short months 

. . . ♦ learn this delightfully simple way 



LEARNING music is no longer a difficult task. If you can read 
the alphabet, you can now quickly learn to play your favorite 
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minute of it — because the new method is agreeable as well as 
rapid! 

No Tricks or Stunts — You Learn from 
"Regular" Music 



Here's Proof! 



"I am making splendid prog- 
ress and can play almost any 
piece of music I pick up. My 
friends used to laugh when I first 
took up music with you, but 
now when I play pieces of 
Grand Opera and selections 
from Verdi, Mozart, Bach, etc. 
it is I who laugh, I owe all I 
have learned to the U. S. short- 
cut method." J. W. R., Telstad, 
Mont. 



"I have found the lessons 
very interesting and exceedingly 
easy. They could not be made 
any clearer in the English 
language. I will always give the 
U. S. School of Music my best 
approval." A. F. B., Clinton, 
N.C. 



"I do not understand how 
you can give so much for the 
money. The course is a musical 
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people in limited financial cir- 
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one can really successfully learn 
to play from your course, with- 
out the aid of a teacher." W. E 
W., Montesano, Wash. 



You don't have to know the first 
thing about music in order to begin. 
You learn to play from actual notes, 
just like the best musicians do. And 
almost before you realize your progress, 
you begin playing real tunes and melo- 
dies instead of just scales. There are no 
trick "numbers," no "memory stunts." 
When you finish the U. S. School of 
Music course, you can pick up any piece 
of regular printed music and play it! 
You'll be able to read music, popular 
and classic, and play it from the notes. 
You'll acquire a life-long ability to 
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if you like, make money. (Musicians 
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instrument, you can now learn to play 
it in an amazingly short time. By means 
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reading and playing music is made al- 
most as simple as reading aloud from a 
book. You simply can't go wrong. 
First you are told how a thing is done, 



then a picture shows you how, then you do it yourself and hear it. 
No private teacher could make it any clearer. The lessons come to 
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and Have a Good Time 

Do you sit "on the sidelines " at a party? Are you 
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So don't miss this exceptional opportunity. 



Free Book and Demonstra- 
tion Lesson 

The whole interesting story about the U. S. 
School course can not be told on this page. So a 
booklet has been printed — "Music Lessons in 
Your Own Home." You can have a copy absolutely 
free by mailing the coupon below. With it will be 
sent a free demonstration lesson which shows bet- 
ter than words how delightfully quick and easy this 
wonderful Method is. If you are really anxious to 
become a good player on your favorite instrument, 
mail the coupon now — today. Instruments sup- 
plied when needed cash or credit. U. S. School of 
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(Please write plainly.) 



Choose Your Course 



Piano 

Organ 

Ukulele 

Cornet 

Piccolo 

Trombone 

Guitar 



Violin 

Clarinet 

Flute 

Saxophone 

Harp 

Mandolin 

'Cello 



Hawaiian Steel Guitar 

Sight Singing 

Piano Accordion 

Voice and Speech 

Culture 
Drums and Traps 
Automatic Finger 

Control 
Banjo (Plectrum, 

S-String or Tenor) 

* * * 

Also for advanced 
pianists a special course 
including 24 famous 
classics — a distinctive 
addition to any pian- 
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U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

6010 Brunswick Bldg., New York City 

Please send me your free book, "Music Lessons in Your Own Home," with in- 
troduction by Dr. Frank Crane, Free Demonstration Lesson and particulars of 
your easy payment plan. I am interested in the following course: _ ; 



.Have you Instrument?. 



Name. . . 
Address . 
City.... 



.State. 



13 



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TJpon completion of "Moran of the 
Marines," Richard Dix will start work 
on "Redskin," which will be made in color. 
Louise Brooks is cast as an Indian girl 
opposite him. 



"Darry Norton, whom you will remember 
as the "Mamma's Boy" of "What 
Price Glory," will play the r61e of Emil 
Jannings' son in his next starring picture 
for Paramount, "Sins of the Fathers." 



"Pxteriors of "The Butterfly Chaser," 
the Harold Lloyd sound picture, are 
now being filmed in San Francisco. This 
story somewhat resembles the theme of 
"Grandma's Boy." 



teatrice Joy has forsaken the silent for 
*- J the spoken drama temporarily. The 
feminine lead in "The Equal" is Miss 
Joy's role on the legitimate stage. 



Although he had been confined to a 
sanitarium for some time, Ward 
Crane's death on July 11 was somewhat of 
a shock to the film industry. His age at the 
time of his death was twenty-seven. 



"HPhe Yankee Doodle Dandy of the 
Screen" has been judged the winning 
slogan by Universal for the Glenn Tryon 
contest. The winning slogan was submitted 
by Ernest Strubbe, of New York City. 



Cue Carol has moved over to the Univer- 
sal lot to play opposite Glenn Tryon in 
his forthcoming picture, "It Can Be 
Done." 



Teila Hyams, who has been working 
at Warner Bros. Studios for some time, 
has been assigned the leading role opposite 
William Haines in "Alias Jimmy Valen- 
tine." The supporting cast includes Karl 
Dane, Lionel Barrymore, Tully Marshall 
and Howard Hickman. 



"T)oris Kenyon will appear in Vita- 
phone's film version of George M. 
Cohan's play, "The Home Towners." 



T 



HE cast selected to date for Universal's 
"Show Boat" includes Laura La Plante, 
Joseph Schildkraut, Alma Rubens, Emily 
Fitzroy, Jack McDonald and Otis Harlan. 
Harry Pollard is the director. 



O ichard Barthelmess has started pro- 
duction on his new film, " Scarlet Seas," 
a sea story based on an original by Scott 
Darling, which marks Richard Barthel- 
mess' return to ocean-going productions. 



1/"arl Brown, who did "Stark Love" for 
■^ Paramount with a cast of natives from 
the Ozarks, has been assigned to direct 
"The Wildcat" for Columbia Pictures. 



J 



HPoM Moore has 
been signed to 
make two pictures 
for FBO. One is 
"His Last Haul," 
which will be direct - 
e d by M ar s h a 1 1 
Neil an, and the 
other is "The Yel- 
lowback." 



UBO has also 
signed Noah 
Beery for two pic- 
tures, "The Red 
Sword" and "Love 
in the Desert." 



I Town 



"Dritish National 
Pictures of 
London has signed 
Gilda Gray, origi- 
nator of the Shimmy 
dance, to make a 
picture which will 
be titled "Picca- 
dilly," by Arnold 
Bennett. E. A. 
Dupont, director of 
"Variety, " will beat 
the megaphone. 




ohn Gilbert and Greta Garbo have just 
begun work as co-stars in "A Woman of 
Affairs," which is 
being directed by 
Clarence Brown 
who directed them 
in ' 'Flesh and the 
Devil" and "Love." 
The story was 
written for them 
by Michael Aden. 



Anita Page is 
playing the 
feminine lead in 
Ramon Novarro's 
new starring film, 
"Gold Braid." 
Miss Page made 
her screen debut in 
the William Haines 
picture, " Telling 
the World." 



P. &> A. Photo 

Mayor Jimmy Walker, of New York City, 
received a riotous welcome when he was a 
guest of the stars and executives at First 
National Studio, Burbank, California. 
He was photographed while saying a few 
words through the microphone 



"O/hen Cecil D e 
Mille joins 
the Metro-Gold- 
wyn organization 
he plans to take a 
number of players 
with him. Phyllis 
Haver, George 
Duryea, Eddie 
Quillan, Rod La 
Rocque and some 
technicians may go 
with De Mille. 



14 



To Men Getting Bald 
I Say / 



V 



No matter how fast your hair is 
falling out— no matter how much 
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dandruff— stop falling hair— grow 
new hair in 30 days- or you don't pay\ 
me a cent/ No strings attached/ Wolfs, 1 
'Ands'or v, May bes"/ New hair or no pay/ 
And you are the sole judge/ 




By ALOIS MERKE 

Founder of the Merke Institute, Fifth Avenue, New York 



SAVE yourself from baldness! Stop 
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Years of training and 
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that in most cases of 
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You're wasting your 
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salves. For such meas- 
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EVIDENCE! 



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new growth of hair coming back 
on bald spot. It is growing in 
very fine. The Thermocap is a 
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Dandruff Leaves Entirely 
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Partly Bald for 10 Years 

"I have been partly bald for 
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skin and never even get to the roots, the real 
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New Hair or No 
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Allied Merke Institutes, Inc. 
Dept. 5610, 512 Fifth Avenue, 
New York City. 



Please send me without cost or obligation a 
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Name 

Address 

Gity State 

15 



* ri^ 



L E F 1 



OVERS 



B ? Walter Rahset 



Hollywood 
BghtandDay 



n 



M 



Thou&hts While Sauntering: Half 
thJ people on the Boulevard in riding- 
ShiKhere aren't that many horses- 
febe DanSs with her latest toy dog- 

-a negro *V*^?£™£^&lo 
just muttering-mat pncej^. mes j 

gentlemen prefer blondes ■ en to 

wonder lf / h ^Xa m K Howard walking 

should 7 have known each other the 
:rSrc„n1t a r rS y n an pah-n„o,her 

S Sal estate salesmen-or worse- 
be rusmn b p poking happy— 

"ff g ^ ^^trr a° f sS 
"shoPpe'-DorgJr "wltcning her through 
the w P mdow- P o g inting to a black meghgee 
—and you ask me why— and you ask me 

why? 

* * * 

^r^esfSmS^^ 

^nudPgl s waytdwing out of time 
Where entertainers bray and sing out of 
Sne Where your left hand knoweth not 
what vour right hand containeth Each 
person who enters the sacred jern pays 
E share of the mortgage-and hell is 
mean , "tiutS A M^Hol^woodcan 
SfyTe'x^toget usi to night 
clubs right off the bat. 

* * * 
Every restaurant man in our midst 
is JoTng hay-wire thinking up tnck-look- 



16 



„Ly Cottage/ dinner at the^ZnlnhW 
a De d r by "laef nfoltie tSJ. U«t,e 

built to resemble LonChaney. 



These eccentric eat mft empon urns 
are like Hollywood extras. Most ot them 
don't have enough P atron K a ^° S 
gmng-but they hang on, bankrupt and 
lalmy And then there is always the 
chance that they may get over-and f eed 
tuhZdas to Gloria Swanson or Chop 
Suey to Charlie Chaplin. 



Ray Jones 

Reginald Denny and his fiancee 
fsobel Stiefel, who's changed her 
name to Betsy Lee, posed for the 
photographer in this rustic scene far 
from the madding crowd— in the 
San Bernardino Mountains 

many thousands in the bank and still 
d,^Vn^lSpur^. e | 

~ h ^Se^rffiThS "S 

SST S""- -CoJf«'' Y ° U ' U See: 



(on the sign outside the door) ^ From a 
Hamburger to an Institution. 
* * * 
Tn the beach—! a la steaming radia- 
tJ Uove Z beach. For rtter .people. 
Evervone was there-four movie stars 
and two hundred press reporters. Each 
reporte? doing his damnedest to get a dif- 
ferent slant on the four "unsuspecting 
stars I arrived late, so 1 had to get mine 
rom below. Lying fiat on my back m 
wet sand, munching a col ^fr a °1- 
gathered the following dope. Sue Caro 
vou just fcHW she wears them Ohve 
Cden-the less said, the better! But 
for two dollars and a self-addressed 
stamped envelope, 1 should tell you.) I 
was ah of a bib-and-tucker at this point 
MY DEAR, when along came beet) 
George O'Brien (Olive's fiance) and 
Slid sand in my eyes Thus endeth al 
operations. Can you BEAR it, m> clear . 



Tripping down the Boulevard I 

came upon our cash-and-carry citizen— 
Peter the Hermit. He's tried to be 
original, at least. Just like some of the 
other boys who think they have some- 
thing new and eccentric to put over on 
the natives, it's a cinch that within forty- 
eight hours they'll catch themselves eom- 
inf around the corner-beard, spats and 
Sf. Too bad they can't patent some of 
"heir trick get-ups. There was a time 
when Peter was as distinctive as 1 oia 
£i He was the last word in hermits. 
SKtraved around the Boulevard, bare- 
headed and bare-footed-gotten upas a 
Sunday school picture of Moses receiving 
the Ten Commandments. Peter became 
the rage He was wined and dined. But 
-iust as he had the world by the tail-a 
couple hundred other high -class her nuts 
sprung up and stole his thunder They 
bump into each other on the Boulevard. 
They infest the hills. Their tents overtop. 
Then- collies, and goats and donkeys 
, nan an d bray in confusion. How can, 
an Li hermit look lonely with so much 
competition? 



PEOPLE I LIKE: Lansing Brown 

Because he's a good kid. And takes 

"wall" pictures. And serves good Scotch 

-^Iged while you wait. And tells good 

stories. And listens to mine. 

* * * 

Si£n on the Playhouse Theater: 

"What A Man." Afternoons, |oc , 

Evenings, $1.00. (Summer Rates. 

What a man ! 




K 




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17 



\ 




Some have it and some haven^t 

Some men can make their way on poise alone. Some 
men can't make their way for lack of it. 

And yet — 

When a man steps out of a bath it is with the feeling 
that the world is at his feet. And when he puts on clean 
linen from top to toe, he puts on with it a feeling of 
self-confidence that often will carry him far. 



There's self-assurance in SOAP & WATER 



PUBLISHED BY THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN SOAP AND GLYCERINE PRODUCERS, INC., TO AID THE WORK OF CLEANLINESS INSTITUTE 
18 





Real estate values in Chicago — particularly those in the downtown districts — are 
expected soon to rise as suddenly as indiscreet politicians. For Myrna Loy is sched- 
uled next to appear on the screen in the title role of "State Street Sadie" 




Spurr 



George Duryea, say those who have seen the picture, has made the significant hit of 

his not overlong career as the boy-friend of "The Godless Girl." As Hollywood has 

it, George both screens and acts like a DeMillion dollars 




Spurr 



Is Sally Eilers stimulating? How could she help being with such smartness and such 
a provocative vivacity. And with these, how could the producers help casting her 

for a leading role in "Dry Martini" 







Carsey 



Movie studio electricians know more about lighting than anybody else in the world. 
And more about the charm and good-fellowship of screen stars than they do about 
lighting. This year, of all the players in Hollywood, they voted Doris Dawson the 

most popular. Are they to blame? 




9 






Fraternal affection is a pretty ideal. But we have an idea that neither Karl Dane 

nor George K. Arthur, playing with Jean Arthur in "Brotherly Love," can succeed 

in keeping his heart strictly within the family 



Hommel 




Ball 



There is cause for the revival of the old song warning all young girls to look out for 
Jimmy Valentine, now that this famous crook story is to be screened again, and this 
time with William Haines in the title role, for their hearts, at his hands, will be no 

safer than a safe 



fe 




Ball 



The screen has been much criticized for its want of precision. But this, we think, is 

in many cases unfair. For all fans will agree that a new picture featuring Lilyan 

Tashman could have no more appropriate title than "Happiness Ahead" 



\ 




SpUTT 



Anyone who doesn't believe that Richard Dix has entirely recovered from his recent 
illness and that he isn't his old and his own rugged self again, should keep in mind 
that he's undertaken right off to play the role of a Marine in "Mpran of the Movies" 



I 




•»*-►-► THE SCREEN MAGAZINE OF AUTHORITY <-«^ 




October, 1928 



MAJOR GEORGE K. SHULER 

Publisher 



LAURENCE REID 

Managing Editor 



DUNCAN A. DOE-IE, JR, 

General Manager 




am era. 



f 



NOT long after the word efficiency became 
the most popular in the language of the 
business man, there was a joke about an 
innovation that one firm had made. 
"How has business been going since you 
installed that new card-index system?" a friend asked the 
boss. 

"Oh," said the boss, "it's taken so much of my time to 
run the system that I haven't had much time to fool 
around with business." 

This anecdote is not advanced as being either novel 
or deserving of a belly-laugh. It has been dusted off and 
put on the table because it presents a situation which has 
its counterpart today in the exhibition of motion pictures. 

SUPER-SPECIAL USHERS 

FOR what with special stage numbers, either under the 
guise of prologues or frankly set before the audience 
as additional attractions to the photoplay, and what with 
the equally theatrical features of management that have 
been instituted, fans may well say, if asked how they liked 
a picture at one of the big houses: "Oh, we didn't have 
much time to look at the picture. But the trained seals 
and the ushers were especially good this week." 

So much has been said about the trained seal as an 
adjunct to the artistic presentation of a motion picture 
that further condemnation of this really pleasant animal 
is unnecessary. The one mistake he is making these days 
is in waiting for his trainer to throw him a fish, when the 
front of the house is peopled with them. When he wants a 
real meal, he should flap around to the box-office. 

What we wish to call attention to here is rather the off- 
stage entertainers: the standing army of ushers, program- 
handers, and no-smoking-pleasers without which no 
million-dollar movie palace can look itself in the face. 

THE HUMAN LAMP-POST 

THE actions of these attendants individually and in 
mass has becomemore and more worthy of note and at- 
tractive of attention. 

Let us take the usher as representative. He is no 
Jonger merely someone who finds a seat for you. 
Indeed, in many cases, his function has been directly 
reversed: he has become an official who keeps you from 



B 



finding a seat. When you arrive in the midst of the seals' 
or soloists' acts, he bars the way, a stalwart and grim 
figure in the middle of the aisle. With a disciplinary white 
glove and a shush of reproof, he bars your walking down 
to any of the three hundred and forty-three empty seats. 
After the seals are through, yes. But not until then. 
You should know better than to try. Your manners are 
not of the best. Back behind the tapes, please. 

so this is service! 

UT even more so are his other duties, his other official 
self: the positive and active efforts that he puts 
forth when sitting is permitted. Leaping toward the 
patron, halting stiffly and saluting, he proceeds first to 
spell out the name of the theater with the little light at 
the end of his wand. A complicated military maneuver 
follows, enabling the usher to turn about. This accomp- 
lished, he races down the aisle and is completely lost in the 
darkness. You follow blindly until you bump into him. 
More saluting, more gyrations of the wand, and you push 
past a whole row of people until you come out into the 
next aisle and find a seat for yourself. It's wonderful. 

It's so wonderful that the directors of the destinies of 
the mammoth picture houses should develop it further. 
They regard it already as an attraction. Why not amplify 
it and advertise it accordingly? Why not have the ushers 
speak in blank verse or, better still, sing their stuff, with 
a few dance steps here and there for relief? 

MORE FUN! 

WHY not have them disappear through trap doors 
and reappear next to the supposed empty seat? It 
could be a game with the patron to see whether or not he 
could find the usher. If he can, he can have his seat; 
if not, he has to watch the prologue. There are infinite 
possibilities. The thing, to use a daring phrase, is only in 
its infancy. It is worth cultivating. For today it is a 
known fact that despite the rigors of the stage entertain- 
ment many people have the stamina to stick through it 
and see the feature. The further development of the ob- 
structive and diverting tactics of theater attendants might 
put an end to this, crush resistance entirely and so attain 
that greatest ambition of the greatest movie houses, to 
obliterate entirely the importance of the movie. 



27 



\ 





/^p 



No one ever has been found 
to fit exactly the shoes of 
these favorites of other days. 
They are: Barbara La Marr, 
in the top corner; Sidney 
Drew, on her right; Rudolph 
Valentino, just below her; 
Clarine Seymour, center; 
Wallace Reid, to the right of 
her; John Bunny, and at the 
left Harold Lockwood 



IT'S all very well to love one another. And, of course, 
we do. With reservations, as Norma Talmadge says. 
But it is admittedly merely human to regard certain 
of the brothers through eyes in which the love-light 
is somewhat dimmed. Those who are after our jobs, for 
instance. 

If you work in a bank, and the fellow whose job is just 
below yours seems over solicitous regarding your health, 
or looks brightly hopeful when the old man calls you into 
"conference," affection, for the moment, may not be your 
chief emotion. Or if that new go-getter salesman is given 
your territory just after you have it nicely primed, your 
congratulatory remarks may not contain just the heart- 
felt ring prescribed by scripture. 

Have you ever thought of the feelings cherished by a 
star toward his understudy? There he is watchfully wait- 
ing in the wings each time you tread the boards of that 
stage whose legitimacy is o'er-much protested. Of course, 

28 



filling 



The Hollywoods 
to the Thrones 



he isn't exactly hoping you'll break 

a leg — or even catch a medium-heavy 

cold. Not exactly. Yet your 

poison is his meat. And only 

through your disaster may 

the door to his success be 

opened. 

Or imagine a moyie 

star. No understudy 

hanging around the 

set. But plenty of 

bright young faces 

quite willing to replace 

yours on the screen, in 

the heart of your public, 

and at the cashier's window on 

pay days. 

Some stars have been so suc- 
cessful. Others have proved irre- 
placeable. In many cases the 
patience of those "who only 
stand and wait" has been repaid 
by an opportunity for fame be- 
fore the dead — or alive — man's 
shoes were ready for occupancy. 
They have won fortune on their 
own by the establishment of their 
own individual personalities on 
the screen. Again, every effort 
to usurp the box-office affections 
of the customers has proved abortive, and the care- 
fully groomed pretender has been thrust into the 
outer darkness. 

A REPLICA OF RUDY 

\X7'HILE Rudy lived, he had some business differences 
* * with the producers which resulted in temporary 
banishment from the screen. This, you recall, was the 
time he toured the country on a dance contest project. 
Latin lovers had been made the last word in romance 
through the Valentino vogue. What, then, could be more 
simple than to dig up a similar type and through the 
power of publicity create his successor. That's how they 
figured it. And that, so they say, is how young Ramon 
Novarro made his debut before the kleigs. 

Of course, Ramon carved a little kingdom of his own 
which still endures. But he never took Rudy's place. Nor 
did anyone else. Wisely enough, the producers have quit 
any attempt to fill it. With Valentino, the passion of the 
fans burned so brightly that his passing was the direct 
cause of an entirely different sort of hero being evolved. 
With increasingly few exceptions, the day of the languish- 
ing Lothario has passed. Names like Vic McLaglen, Eddie 
Lowe, Jack Gilbert, Ronald Colman are more on marquees. 
Anglo-Saxon and Celt are having their innings. 

Perhaps Pola Negri's flame burned brightest about the 
time Rudy's star was in the ascendent. Now it seems that 
Pola is through. Here, at any rate. And the air is thick 




oes 



Are Full of Persistent Pretenders 
of the Established Great 



By 

HERBERT 
CRUIKSHANK 




with conjecture regarding her successor. Baclanova, the 
talented Russian, is among those mentioned. She's a fine 
actress and should find her niche. But she'll never be a 
second Negri. There never will be one. Pola stands alone. 
She is unique and inimitable. Putting aside the question 
of mismanagement, if Pola has passed, it is because the 
characterizations with which she became identified have 
ceased to find favor with the fans. 

When Tom Mix quit Fox, there was great fanfare and 
flourish in announcing Tom's successor, one Rex King— 
and later a Rex Bell. But Tom returned from Elba in 
record time, and so the result of the experiment must 
remain in abeyance. 

There have been challengers for Chaplin's throne. But 
the crown of his triumphs remains securely upon his grey- 
ing locks. He, too, is among the immortals. The world 
will never see his like again. 

JANNINGS AND JEAN 

ERHAPS the greatest dramatic actor of the hour is 
Emil Jannings. Certain roles are typical "Jannings 
roles." No one else can play them. Yet, were the mighty 
German "taken for a ride" by Elijah, say, the sort of 
portrayal associated with his name might still be given to 
the public through Jean Hersholt. For the versatility of 
the durable Dane makes it well 
within the scope of possibility 
that he could fill Jannings 
shoes. Meantime, of 
course, Hersholt goes 
his way, serenely con- 
tributing top-notch 
performances in medi- 
ocre pictures. With 
now and then a good 
one thrown in — by 
accident. 

Mary Miles 
Minterwas 
groomed as care- 
fully as "Man o' 
War" to replace 
Mary Pickford. 
But "Our Mary" 
is still with us — 
and the other Mary, 
well, she may be in 
vaudeville. It is odds 
against Douglas Fairbanks' 
relinquishing his regal robes 
to a usurper. Doug isn't the 
best actor in the world, but he 
occupies a unique niche — and al- 
ways will. 

Gilbert Roland took his very name 
from a combination of the names of Jack 
Gilbert and Ronald Colman. Which may 
or may not give an idea of what the producers 



had in mind for him. But Roland, thus far, doesn't seem 
to have evidenced sufficient strength to justify elevation to 
stardom. 

From the very beginning of the movies, there have been 
substitutes lurking just around the corner. When John 
Bunny had a falling out with (Continued on page 117) 



New aspirants for the lau- 
rels of the old: at the right, 
George Duryea; just below, 
Sue Carol; at her right, 
Matty Kemp; on Sue's 
left, Edward Nugent; at 
the extreme left, Ann Page; 
at the bottom, Paul Vin- 
centi — left — and Rex Bell — 
right 




29 




'".V.., 



C. S. Bull 



'Pan - Handling 



Marceline Day confesses to this as an avocation. But she 
doesn't do it for money, but for altruism, merely in the in- 
terest of bigger and batter pancakes 



30 



^Aid that d(\)oks 
Like a Cjim 

Or Two That Look Like 
Richard Barthelmess Twice: 
Mrs. McQuoid Can Find Them 



-,^jfd0>. 






/ 



b#H ^ 



% "^S? 



tf 



BY LAMAR TROTTI 

IN these days of hard-boiled virgins and soft-boiled 
yeggs, of gentlemen who prefer blondes, and of 
blondes who prefer gin, it's an exceedingly wise 
casting director who knows his crop of extra onions. 

Almost any day he's likely to wake up to find that 
Minnie Gesticulo has become a Scandinavian beauty over- 
night, or that Death Valley Pete, pride of Paiute County, 
has suddenly grown sideburns and a mustache and learned 
to heave his bosom like a Latin lover from Terre Haute. 

Either that or he'll find a not-to- 
be-answered-back director tearing 
out his hair in search of a prophet 
with a twenty-seven foot beard, or a 
lady lion-tamer who can do the 
black bottom on top of a revolv- 
ing ball to the accompaniment of 
positively the only feline chorus 
in captivity. 

Yet it's this very 
uncertainty th at 
makes casting for 
pictures in Holly- 
wood what it is — 
one of the most fas- 
cinating jobs in 
Christendom, — or, 
that is to say, in 
^lickerdom. It's a 



»»»"*- -w 



f > 



Richard Barthelmess, 

above, and the twins 

chosen to resemble him 

as a child 



.■«i 



--' 



m ■< 



Clara Bow, 
Gary Cooper 
and Esther Ral- 
ston and the 
children they 
might have 
looked like; 
and, farther 
left, Ramon 
Novarro and, 
below him, Phil- 
ippe De Lacy 



"-<•* 






hundred times more amusing than chasing elusive words for a diagram- 
less crossword puzzle, though, come to think of it, that's exactly what 
the casting director is doing when he fits human beings, with peculiarly 
shaped noses and missing front teeth and sparkling brown eyes, into 
little four and three and eight letter spaces, which when completed, 
solve his puzzle, the motion picture. 

CASTING IS SO JOLLY 

TO carry on this idea, — there is an average of nine hundred and 
five jobs, or squares, a day to be filled by the casting bureau; 
and nobody knows what those squares are to contain until the diagram 
is drawn and the across and the down keys are listed at the end of a 
seven-dollar-and-a-half day. {Continued on page 119) 

31 



V 







JZfopard 



He was just that, the animal 
that so considerately agreed to 
provide his skin to shield Nancy 
Carroll from the gaze of the 
prehistoric public. The occasion 
of this is Nancy's part as leading 
woman for Jack Holt in the 
Zane Grey story, ' 'The Water 
Hole" 



Dyar 



32 




creenless 



s 



creen 



This is One ^Marvel that Qlarence 'Brown, 

IVizard of 'Profits and Prophesies, 

Foresees Qlearly 

BY BURT KNIGHT 



EACH age has its prophets. Keen dreamers, shrewd 
idealists, whose clear mental perception enables 
them to pierce the pall of to- 
day and envision the glo- 
ries of tomorrow. Yesterday, men 
mocked Galileo, Copernicus, Bruno, 
Columbus. A second since, as time's 
history is figured, smug scoffers 
jeered at Bell, Fulton, Edison, Mar- 
coni and the rest. Yet the world does 
move, it is round, there are tele- 
phones, steamboats, radio and mo- 
tion pictures. Remember these 
things when you gaze awestruck 
down the years through the blue- 
grey eyes of director Clarence Brown. 
Yes, Brown's the name. With no 
steins, skys, vons, or macs prefixed 
or suffixed. He's an American. Born 
in Boston, raised in Tennessee. Per- 
haps the cold-blue blood of the Cod- 
fish State accounts for the steel-like 
qualities of mind which enabled him 
to win degrees in electrical and 
mechanical engineering. Thrust 
him into huge auto 
motive 





An every-day name 
but not an every-day 
mind has Clarence 
Brown: his visions of 
the future outdo in 
imagination these 
paintings by Warren 
Newcombe 



plants, made him 
an aeronautical in- 
structor during the 
war. If so, then 
surely the sun of 
the South must be 



credited with having branded him a dreamer whose imagina- 
tion vaults the moon. 

This same happy combination is again to the fore in 

crowning Brown the box-office ace of cinematic art. 

He never misses at the pay-stile. Yet, four times the 

country's critics have nominated his photoplays among 

the year's ten best. He makes art pay. He is a very 

\ practical dreamer. 

So often ability and appearance are at wide 

variance. Not so here. For Brown is a figure for 

fiction. Tall, stalwart, bronzed, immaculately clad, 

he. has directed many an allegedly handsome hero 

who would have to bend the knee in defeat if 

Paris offered another golden apple. He is modest 

to a point approaching diffidence. He likes to 

laugh, and it is not necessary to diagram the 

i point of your pun. In pictures he believes the 

|p\\ story is the thing. And that the mechanical, 

z-^~*~^» the physical, side of the industry is miles beyond 

its human elements. He gives the impression that 

the use of filmdom's mammoth (Continued on page 112) 

33 







Louise 



Sky-high in the 
affections 
of their stellar 
sons and daugh- 
ters: at the 
right, Mrs. Phyl- 
lis Daniels, with 
Bebe ; j ust above 
them, Mrs. Men- 
jou dining with 
Adolphe; Mrs. 
George Haines, 
with her son, 
William; and 
Mrs. Margaret 
Talmadge, 
between Norma 
and Constance 

34 




o Good to 
their QyTuothers! 

IF you think marrying a big Butter and Egg Man puts you on Easy 
Street — you probably think right. But there is an easier way. 
And by that I don't mean anything censorable. 

All you have to do is give birth to a movie star. The rest is pie 
and cream. Not a full-fledged one, you know, just a potential movie 
star. Now don't say you can't. You never know. And it's encouraging 
to remember that it has been done. 

Of course, after the movie star is born a certain amount of exertion 
will be required of you. 

The pattern usually runs like this: A Little Mother has one, two or 
three children. In the Pickford family there were three. In the Gish 
family, two. But one is better. More dramatic. And easier for me to 
write about. 

So far so good. The babe is born and papa, whoever he may be, does 
half a Houdini. Which is to say, he disappears, but does not reappear. 
You will note upon reflection that movie papas are rarities. Whither 
he goes, nobody seems to know. He must have 
existed once upon a time, but he exists no longer. 
For all working purposes, he is shrouded in a 
decent veil of obscurity. One doesn't ask about 
him. One knows better. 

The Little Mother then begins to labor in the 
vineyard. She is self-sacrificing, brave and tender. 
She keeps the wolf from the door by innumerable 
pitiful expedients. She takes in sewing or boarders. 
If the little dolling has golden ringlets and a lisp, 
the little Mother teaches her "pieces." By the 
light of the midnight oil. She instructs her in gay 
little dances — and sends her on the road. Thus 
is the first step accomplished. 



BRAVE, PROUD LITTLE MOTHER 

F the little dolling shows no aptitude for any- 
thing but pigging food and scrapping with the 
neighbors' children, the Little Mother may do a 
piece of acting herself. But always she declines all 



I 




tampering Barents 

Is Hollywood^ Qreatests' 

(greatest Weakness 



By GLADYS HALL 

offers of help from Distant Relatives. She says, "We will stick to- 
gether. We will not be separated while I have a pair of willing hands. 
I will keep my little brood intact." 

The Little Mother's brave words ring, a clarion, in the little dolling's 
ears. For all time to come. And if you don't think the brave words 
bear golden fruit, you are no Luther Burbank. 

Eventually, the Little Mother treks to Hollywood. A Break breaks. 
And more quickly than I can tell you, the little dolling is rollsing about 
and the Little Mother is entrenched behind butlered doors that no 
mere wolf would dare to sniff at. 

There is a sacred and profane side to every weighty matter. And 
this devotion of the screen stars to their mothers has its sacred side. 

In many a piece of fact and fiction you have heard of the base in- 
gratitude of daughters, sharper than a serpent's tooth. You have 
heard of profligate sons who have let Mother go over the still to the 
poorhouse. But you have never heard of such a happenstance among 
the movie stars. 

It is true that the 'aforementioned horrors are more 
or less infrequent. Most children are more or less 
decent to their progenitors. But the movie stars 
exceed the bounds of expected decency. They are fan- 
atic. Their loyalty runs like fire through their veins 
and through their pocket books. Mother comes first 
to the movie stars — and let no man or women think 
otherwise. 

I know whereof I speak. I have had it by word of 
mouth and by sight of eye. Time and time again. 

And try as one will to be flippant about it, it is 
really rather beautiful. It is a commentary worth mak- 
ing on the gelatin gods and goddesses who are, both 
rightly and wrongly, accused of character bank- 
ruptcies. 

When Mrs. Charlotte Pickford's will was read, 
there were few dry eyes in Hollywood. For the 
mother spoke in hallowed words of the devotion of 
her daughter Mary. She forever {Continued on -page 86) 




Parted at times 
by circumstance, 
but al w ays 
inseparable in 
spirit, are 
Gary Cooper 
and his mother 
— at the left— 
and Pola Negri 
and hers. 
Higher up, the 
late Mrs. Pick- 
ford and Mary; 
Mrs. Barthel- 
mess and Rich- 
ard; and Mrs. 
Gish.with Lillian 
and Dorothy 

35 








Estelle Taylor's 
skill with the 
skillet, they say, 
is one big reason 
why her mar- 
riage with Jack 
Dempsey has 
panned out so 
well 




We've never tried to get Renee Adoree's goat; and so we 

regard it as uncalled for that, by clasping him here so 

enviably close, she should proceed to get ours 



The impudence of the modern young woman has come 
in for much disfavor. But Donald Reed — at the right — 
seems to have little fault to find with Billie Dove's 
cheek 




Gossip of the 



M 1 



•ILT GROSS, author of "Nize Baby," is 
the Hollywood wise-era cker of the moment 
most frequently quoted at the Montmartre. 
They are telling this one which Milt introduced 
at the last dinner of the Wasps, the lady public- 
ity purveyors: 

"You should see what mine Abie brings by 
the house yet," said Mrs. Baumberg of the Second Floor, 
to Mrs. Finklebaum of the Third Rear, "a lous pikker, if 
you belief me!" 

"Oy, oy!" said Mrs. Finklebaum, amazed, "A lous pik- 
ker already? They don't told me they should allow mon- 
keys in the flets!" 

"A lous pikker ain't a monkey," reproved Mrs. Baum- 
berg. "A lous pikker, Miz Finklebaum, is naturalish, a 
radio!" 

A Linguistic Misteak 

'HE one laugh at the solemn ceremony of laying a cor- 
nerstone for a new laboratory at Fox. As an argument 
for fewer titles and clearer pantomime, the speaker was 
telling of the difficulties of translating thought accurately 
from one language to another. 

"I saw one of our big feature pictures in a Mexican 
theater in Los Angeles the other day," said he. "A zealous 
translator had done his best to put the English captions 
into Spanish, but the result was not all he hoped for. 'The 
spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak' was one title. This 
put literally into Spanish informed the audience that 'The 
ghost is ready, but the meat is bad!'" 

Maybe He'll Say Hen 

"T-XAS he laid that cornerstone yet?" asked one of the 
guests of a newspaperman. "Can't see him, but I 




36 



Carsey 








V CIAS' 



Stars and Studios 

don't think so," came the reply, "he hasn't cackled yet!" 

Unfurnished Rumor 

'"PWO Hollywood extras met on the street. "Are you 
going to May's wedding?" asked one flapper. 
"May married?" amazed the other, "why I didn't even 

know there was any scandal about her!" 

She Didn't Ore Dentist 

"CHE was a miner's daughter," said the title writer, "she 
had gold in her teeth." 

The Pity of It ! 

"TT WAS one of those compassionate marriages," 
sighed the vamp. 

He Wants His Name Untullied 

'T'S different when one gets a taste of his own 
medicine. Jim Tully has never hesitated to tell Holly- 
wood just w'hat he thought of it, and Jim has stepped on 
some famous toes in his time. Behold, then, Tully, when 
his own wife sued him for divorce, calling up all the news- 
papers with the plea, "Keep it out of print, won't you?" 

Vive la Deutschland 

TT WAS the first preview of "Lilac Time" at a little 
theater in a country town. The screen was showing the 
different armies on the eve of the Big Push. First the 
British soldiers. The organist, a bushy German who runs 
the delicatessen in the daytime, played Tipperary half- 
heartedly. Then the camera shifted to the German troops. 
Beaming, Herr organist pulled out all the stops on the 




Ball 

For more than her beauty Dolores del Rio — above — should be 
celebrated. She has succeeded, if our imagination and Le Roy 
Mason's expression are a guide, in making strangulation a pleasure 





Wyckoff 

It's all very well for Mary Brian to have a garden. 

But, with a budding beauty like hers she should not, in 

consideration of the vanity of her flowers, be pictured 

with them 



The face that launched a thousand pineapples: Olive 

Borden, at the left, as she appears with Jack Pickford 

in "Gang War" 



Bachrach 




37 




Hesser 
Speaking — if anyone has been — of the command to love, here in 
pantomime Jeanette Loff utters it: Right shoulder, arms 




All the Gossip of the 

organ at once and sailed powerfully into The Watch on the 
Rhine. The scenes changed to the American troops, the 
French, the Italians, but the organ continued to boom The 
Watch on the Rhine. It was the first time in years the player 
had had the chance to express his patriotism, otherwise 
than in selling sauerkraut. 

Canny Connie 

QONSTANCE TALMADGE was marveling over the 
fact that Dorothy Gish and James Rennie after five 
years of marriage were still husband and wife. "Though I 
suppose," said Connie thoughtfully, "the reason they're still 
together is because they're apart so much. They really 
haven't lived with each other long enough to separate." 

Probably Money 

"TX7HAT are they going to use for money?" was once 
the repartee when the Warner Brothers spoke of 
their plans. "What a town Hollywood is," exclaimed 
Georgie Jessel at a preview, "the Warner Brothers came 
out here with only fifty cents in their pockets and look at 
them now. They owe forty millions." But the joke is on the 
other producers now. The Warners have slipped in ahead 
of the rest with the Vitaphone and are reaping a fortune 
from their foresightedness. 

The Wholesale Host 

A ND speaking of the talkies they are likely to make 
trouble for one actor. In the trailer to "The Lion and 
the Mouse," Buster Collier beams from the screen and 
issues the following invitation, "I hope you will like me in 
the picture, and if any of you ever come to Hollywood I 
want you to come to my home and have dinner zvith me!" A group of 
wags in the audience got together after the premiere and started out 
to rustle up some guests for Buster. Two days later a crowd of thirty- 
two hungry tourists from Iowa and Kansas stormed the Collier villa 
in Beverly Hills, telling the perturbed butler they had been invited to 
dinner. 

Tie that One, D. W. 

PEW PEOPLE know that William Jennings Bryan's daughter, Mrs. 
Owens, once had screen ambitions. She made a motion picture with 
her own money, and it wasn't such a bad picture at that. At the finish 
of its preview she turned to a famous critic seated beside her. "It may 
not be Griffith," said she with a twinkle, "but I bet. I did something in 
that picture that Griffith never could do. 
ture and nursed a baby at the same time 

So Do Von Stroheim's 

TT IS SAID that Cecil B. De Mille 
will make "The Darling of the 
Gods " as his first United Artists pic- 
ture, which of course has started the 
saying: "DeMille's of the gods grind 
slowly." 



II 



He never made a motion pic- 
I did." 



Apeda 

Norma's sports costumes are modest, for all that they 
are — all of them, and this one in particular — most de- 
cidedly of the Shearer sort 



Unlucky for some, perhaps, but not for itself; this 

black cat statuette has gone and got itself not only 

owned but admired by Laura La Plante 




38 



Stars and Studios 

Ringing the Belle 

p\ICK GRACE, the daredevil film aviator, according tb 
one enthusiastic admirer, "isn't afraid of anything at 
all. He's engaged to Alice White." 

A Band of Sammynoles 

'"PHE roadhouse 1 had an Indian name and an Indian 
orchestra in feathers and war paint. "Are you real 
Indians?" asked the film ingenue. "Sure, lady," replied 
the leader, a brave in buckskin, "we should be Indians, 
ain't it? Fool bloud Indians." 

Naturally, She Kicked 

'pEXAS GUINAN has a dark secret in her life. No, not 
what you mean at all. Her dark secret according to 
Harry Carr is that her real name is Mamie. The Queen of 
Broadway once savagely rebuked friends from back home 
who called her that in her night club. "Don't you call me 

Mamie," said Texas, "it sounds like I was an old blind 

i " 
mule. 

Just a Duplicity Man 

]" don't like Lon Chaney," said the visiting fan, "I think 
he's just a two-faced thing!" 

Speeding the Hostess 

TpSTELLE TAYLOR is famous for her entertainments, 
and her guests always hate to go home from her parties. 
At a recent affair at the Dempsey home it grew later and 
later, and still everyone was reluctant to leave. Finally one 
young man approached the hostess. "Estelle," said he 
desperately, "will you please go to bed so we can all go 
home?" 

The Maehe Baby 

r AS Mae Murray a baby or hasn't she? That is the question. Mae 
certainly gives the movie colony plenty to talk about. As usual, 
Hollywood has taken sides. Anyway, her husband the Prince says she 
has a baby and she hasn't come out and denied it. 

His Belated Birth 

TIMMIE WALKER, the sartorial 
J Mayor of New York City, has been 
out here, giving eyes tired of handsome 
movie stars a treat. At a luncheon at 
First National today Jimmie admitted 
that he had received an offer of ten 
thousand a week in the movies. "But 
I don't think your contracts are fair," 
(Continued on page 100) 




Ball 



Perhaps to get herself attuned to a mildly marine mood, Alma 

Rubens, soon to appear in "Show Boat," has donned a middy blouse 

and taken to standing near fountains 



H' 







Cleveland 
No, Vera Reynolds — above — hasn't just caught sight 
of a mouse or a horrid, horrid bug; she's merely going 
into dainty girlish ecstasy over a flower 



Three dogs, two being tan and the other being brindle- 

and-white. And all being the property of Lloyd 

Hughes 



Lansing Brown 



39 



1 





ei^hbor 



Lansing Brown 



Top is a photograph of Betsy Musser, of 
Lancaster and directly above is the Watt 
& Shand Department Store Building and 
to the right is a typical street scene in 
Lancaster, Pa. 

SHE'S the treasurer's daughter. 
Yes, sir. But not the Presi- 
dent's daughter. No, ma'am. 
A couple of administrations 
back she was just a little schoolgirl 
in a small town in Pennsylvania. 
She's young, oh, about nineteen or 

thereabouts, but you couldn't ex- ~ 

actly call her a flapper. She looks 

like Lila Lee in a way. Tall and dark and willowy. You 
get the idea? You probably know her in your town as 
Sally or Ruth or Helen. In this case, her name is Betsy 
Musser and her father commutes to his office in the State 
Treasury Building, Harrisburg, from their home at 102 
Ann Street, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 

It's a long jump from Lancaster to Hollywood in more 
ways than one. For instance, Hollywood is Hollywood 
and Lancaster is, well, different. Hollywood has her flap- 
pers and Lancaster has religion. Hollywood has Japs and 
Lancaster has Dutchmen. The only thing they have in 
common is their hills. But even at that, Hollywood's are 
bare and Lancaster's are flowery. How do I know? 
Betsy told me — and Betsy is kind a proud of Lancaster. 

1 he idea ought to be pretty well planted by now that 
Betsy is just a home-folks girl visiting in Hollywood and 

40 



^Eetsy <L%fCusser, of Lancaster, 
'Thinks of Hollywood and the Qhances 

By WALTER 

rpiIIS is the second of a series of articles giving the impres- 
-*- sions that Hollywood makes upon people from various 
parts of the country. 

Not people in the movies. Not people in the real estate 

business. Not people making money out of sensational 

stories. Not people allied with any civic boosting association. 

But people from the home-towns. People next door. 

Neighbors. 

Last month the neighbors of N. R. Dawley, of Charleston, 

West Virginia, found out what he — from the viewpoint of 

himself and of his city — thought of Hollywood. This 

month neighbors of Miss Betsy Musser, of Lancaster, 

Pennsylvania, will find out the same things. Next 

month — well, we don't know. We never know 

whom our interviewer is going to capture. 

Maybe somebody in your street, or your town, 

or the town next to yours. 

And it'll be interesting. Because you'll get 
I the real inside story of how Hollywood looks to 

Jf a newcomer. The true, unbiased story. 

Not merely the things that other people think 
you would be interested in. But the things that 
you'd be interested in. Because they're the 
things that interest someone from your town. 
Watch this series. The next neighbor to come 
forward may be yours. — Editor's Note. 

now, maybe, you might like to know what 
she thinks of our little town. And the movies. 
And Jack Gilbert. And ether 
points of interest. Would 
you? I thought so. Step 
right into Betsy's parlor (they 
call 'em that back in Lan- 
caster). A couple of houses 
away, where Jack Dempsey 
and Estelle Taylor live, they 
call it a drawing-room. But 
that's Lancaster for you — 
' and Hollywood. 

Betsy was dressed like a 
well-bred movie star. More 
of the Florence Vidor stufF 
and less of the Alice White. 
Not that she reminded me of 
either one. Betsy has no 
"dear public." She has rela- 
tives instead. 
" I'm visiting my aunt out here," she said, after we were 
seated. I'm glad it was an aunt instead of a mamma. All 
movie stars have got mammas. "I've been out here about 
three weeks and the first two weeks I was troubled with 
extreme lockjaw and paralysis of the heart. Hollywood 
hits you that way at first — but I'm just about recuperated 
now. 

BOURBON FOR BABIES 

MOVIE stars? Oh, I've seen lots of them. Jack 
Gilbert, Lawrence Gray, Buddy Rogers and Char- 
lie Farrell. I suppose I'll be the envy of all the girls back 
in Lancaster now because I have actually seen them and 
they have just dreamed about them. I also saw quite a 
few of the well-known actresses. But after all, what girl 
can bother about the actresses when the actors are around. 





Betsy was quite thrilled to have Colleen 

Moore pose with her when she visited 

the star at her studio 



c Pennsylva?iia, 'Tells What She 

of (J iris Who Want to .Gjo There 

RAMSEY 

"I remember what I used to think Hollywood 
was. Just about the wildest spot on earth and 
anyone who went there was wild too. I had the 
idea that it was just a little world all by itself — 
just a playground overflowing with handsome 
men and beautiful women — and they used bour- 
bon for the bottle-babies. Or maybe all the babies 
got bourbon. And as for the 
movie stars, everyone said that 
they believed in companionate 
marriage — minus the marriage. 
And they wanted their love free 
(inexpensive). Oh, yes, and the 
idea was very well fixed in Lan- 
caster that murder was a daily 
occurrence in Hollywood and 
that entertainment was just 
another word for intoxication. 
We had a hunch that it was a 
place where one could do any- 
thing and get away with it. 
Old Dame Criticism was never 
supposed to have lived there." 
Betsy laughed a nice, Lancaster 
laugh and added, "I suppose that 
is the reason all the girls at Ship- 
pens, where I went to school, 
wanted to get to Hollywood. 

" We girls at school used to get 
together and talk nothing but Hol- 
lywood. Of course, we didn't let 
our parents or the teachers know 
it. They wouldn't have under- 
stood. But anyway we were well 
posted on the latest movie divorces 
and we could name ConstanceTal- 
madge's husbands in their proper 
order. Colleen Moore was our fa- 
vorite girl-star and Charlie Farrell 
the chosen boy. Hollywood had it 
all over Paris for fascination to us. 
It seemed just about as far away, 
too. So you can imagine the 
high excitement and fever 
when I announced to the Beta 
Sigma sorority that this sum- 
mer vacation I was coming to 
Hollywood." Betsy paused, 
giving me a chance to imagine 
it. "Why, Kitty Kraedy 
nearly died. 

"After what seemed like 
about nine thousand years on 
the train I finally got here. 
'Los Angeles!' yelled the 
porter but I was already about 
half out to Hollywood by that 
time. My aunt wanted to fix 
me some lunch but I couldn't 



"^mm 




Above is the Griest Building and a 

Lancaster street scene showing how 

the Mennonites wear 'em 



Among the Things That 
Betsy Says — 

I used to think all movie stars believed in com- 
panionate marriage — without the marriage. 

All the girls have taken Anita Loos too seriously. 

For a girl to pull up her stockings in a traffic 
congestion is a quaint old Hollywood custom. 

It's a great place to commute to from Lancaster 
— often. 

If all movie stars were like Noah Beery, it would 
be easy to believe press-agents. 

Because you're a hit in a school play, don't get 
yourself mixed up with Noah Beery. 



be bothered. I just wanted to 
get on Hollywood Boulevard 
and stay there the rest of the 
day. 

BLONDES AND BLONDES 

I DON'T know just what 
I did think of the Boule- 
vard at first. It was so dif- 
ferent from what I had expected, with its 
gay little shops and the background of 
the hills. Pepper-trees and palm trees 
and all that. It seemed so peaceful and 
calm. Almost like Lancaster on Sunday. 
Only there was a difference. The street 
didn't seem to be so different from my 
own Ann Street, so I figured out that it 
must be the people. 

"I noticed the girls. They all seemed 
to have taken Anita Loos too seriously — 
blondes to the right of me — blondes to 
the left of me — powdered and blundered. 
That's one thing the girls in Lancaster 
wouldn't do. I surmised that these girls 
must be movie extras and it seemed that 
they had just as soon pull up their stock- 
ings in a traffic congestion as 

! in the privacy of their rooms. 

Nobody else but me paid much 
attention to them, though. So 
I guessed it was merely a 
quaint old Hollywood custom. 
"The men seemed equally 
elaborate. As I passed the 
Montmartre Cafe, Tom Mix's 
yellow custom-built roadster 
whirled by with Tom. All I 
could see was an enormous 
sombrero and initials, T. M., at 
every place you could put an 
initial. Somehow or other, it 
didn't seem gaudy, though. It 
(Continued on page 104) 



41 






that 




i 



WAS being interviewed once before, and this fellow 
and I had talked a couple of hours when all of a 
sudden he looked over at me and asked, 'What's 
yourname?' I said, 'Donald Reed. ' 'Well, for the 
love of God,' he said, 'I thought you were Gilbert 
Roland.'" 

Laugh that off. 

That's what Donald Reed has been doing ever since he 
hit our little suburb of the cinema. Donald, who used to 
be Ernest Gillen, and before that, Ernesto Guillen, figures 
that if you don't take Hollywood with a couple of chuckles 
and a shaker of salt, it will make a character man out of any 
juvenile. 

" I guess he figured it didn't make much difference which 
of us Mexican boys he talked to," explained the youthful 
Mr. Reed. "He could use his Spanish adjectives on 
one as well as the other." 

Having made sure that I was talking to him under 
no illusion that he was Gilbert Roland or even George 
Lewis, he seated himself back of a desk in the First 
National publicity office ready to reveal all. He 
looked as romantic as a press agent's blurb. But he 
talked Yankee. I gathered that he was rather proud 
of his Americanism. He pointed out that he photo- 
graphed strictly "typical young American" and 
that's the reason he had picked the sound name of 
Donald Reed instead of Jose Carramba or Enrico 
Tamale for professional purposes. He said he saw no 



T) on aid c I(eed > s Sense 
'I of Humor Has T^econciled 
Him to Hollywood 

BY DOROTHY MANNERS 



particular reason to trade on the Latin stuff, especially 
when he had no accent to back it up. 

UNBROKEN ENGLISH 

"T'VE been in this country about fourteen years and so 
■*• it's a little late for me to spring up with an accent. 
Besides, what would my schoolteachers think? I always 
got an A in English when I was going to the Pasadena High 
School. Every now and then I make a grammatical error. 
But so do a lot of Americans." 

Donald was born in Mexico City about twenty-five or 
six years ago. When he was just a kid, his family moved 
him up to California for several {Continued on page 102) 



With Donald Reed mak- 
ing love to her, Eillie 
Dove can be wearing 
furs solely for the sake of 
appearance 




42 



*A 



out 




to be 

c }(jssed 



And not only once, but sev- 
eral times — the party of the 
second and enviable part 
being Rod La Rocque in a 
new photoplay. No wonder, 
when his performance in- 
cludes such an achievement 
with Sue Carol, that he's 
named the picture they're 
in "Captain Swagger" 



Lansing Brown 




43 



c/Jaby Stars Learn 

^alkie-^alk 



By 

Cedric 

Belfrage 



WELL, it has come to this at last. It 
couldn't have been postponed much 
longer anyway, I suppose. The movie 
stars have got to learn to talk. 
A small group of kind-hearted souls 
in Hollywood, deeply touched by the 
facial and bodily contortions into which the stars have 
had to go, owing to their inability to speak at personal 
appearances on the stage, has for some time been trying 
to raise interest in a fund to bring the light of language to 
the studio fraternity. Nothing, however, could appar- 
ently be done to give them the benefits of conversation 

with their fellow- 
men. They pre- 
ferred to go on as 



In scenes of panting 
pantomime like this, 
talking would only 
interfere with the 
progress of the work 
at hand 




they had always done, talking among themselves in 
their strange native sound-language. 

And now the wheel of circumstance has taken the mat- 
ter out of their hands. The talking picture has arrived, 
and nothing will do but that the movie boys and girls 
should abandon their private vocabulary of sounds and 
pick up a few words, as the outside world calls them. By 
hook or by crook they have got to make themselves 
understood to Mr. and Mrs. Brown, of Brownsville, 
or go and have their contracts spanked by the head- 
master. 

It is welkin-time for teachers of voice culture. They are 
buckling. on the belt of confidence and announcing that, 
having now concluded their prolonged engagement with 
the Metropolitan Opera or what have you, they are pre- 
pared to coach select pupils in voice culture and diction 
for talking pictures. 

SILENCE NO LONGER GOLDEN 

PRACTICALLY anyone in Hollywood who knows that 
"woid" should be pronounced word is on velvet. The 
studios are beginning to comb the city for geniuses graced 
by a kindly Providence with this knowledge. The tiny 
handful of actors already knowing how to talk have 
been snapped up on temptingly generous contracts. 
Lionel Barrymore, for instance, who in "The Lion 
and the MouSe," proved to be the only player that 
didn't speak through his nose and whistle his s's, was 
pounced upon by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, who shortly 
before had lost interest in him and turned him loose. 
The first two eminent teachers of voice to the stars 
are Felix Hughes, brother of Rupert Hughes; and 
Mrs. Paul Sloane, wife of the director. Hughes, 
for some years one of the foremost singing 
teachers of America, bases his talkie voice 
course on the opinion that with the average 
movie star it's not the nasty things 'e sez but 
the nasty way 'e sez it. He feels that many 
more stars than one would think really do 
know how to talk but use such husky, 
nasal voices that nobody but their 
own tribe can make out what 
they're talking about. He is set- 
ting out to get what he calls 
point into his pupils' voices, a 
ringing quality without which, 
he says, no voice records well, 
either on phonograph or talking 
movie. His prize exhibit is 
Virginia Bradford, who hails 
from the South and has, in 
Hughes's opinion, the most beautiful 
natural voice in Hollywood. She is one 
case in a thousand of a star who would im- 
prove on her personality in talking pictures. After 



44 






. 




Drawings by C. Mulholland 



zAll the ^Movie twiddles iAre 

learning the Fascinating A J ew 
Word Qame 



hearing Virginia's voice and diction I raise my right hand 
to remark that she is the first good argument yet for 
talking movies. 

Mrs. Paul Sloane is going to combine with Andres de 
Segurola, the monocled chappie from the Metropolitan, 
and will conduct a big three-ring voice school for the 
Demmy Lamson actors' agency. She is another old hand 
at the singing game, but she believes much more training 
is necessary to make movie stars talk than is contained in 
Felix Hughes's philosophy. Quality of production is only 
one factor in her program. Mrs. Sloane has set her jaw 
firmly for the task, which she obviously considers pretty 
Herculean, of putting honeyed words into the mouths of 
screen celebrities. Her prize pupils, for whom she has 
high hopes that one day they will speak practically like 
Julia Marlowe, are Carmel Myers and Nancy Carroll. 

DOUBLING IN CELLULOID 

THE studios appear to be buoyed up by the hope that 
they can get most of thefr players talking under- 
standable English in a few months. Whether or not they 
are grand optimists, there is undoubtedly going to be 
trouble when it comes to some of the Hollywood foreign 
colony. Many foreign-born importations have never 
taken the trouble to learn any English beyond the useful 
phrase: "Garbo (or who-have-you) want more salary." 
They will look upon any attempt to teach them the rest 
of the language as an infringement of their rights. 

The difficulty set up by players who cannot or will not 
learn English is calmly dispelled by the producers' idea of 
employing "voice doubles." This scheme is for the actor 
merely to mouth the words as he goes along, the sounds 
being produced by another voice at another time and 
synchronized. "The Jazz Singer" had portions done in 
this way. Some of Jolson's songs were sung (although by 
Jolson) at a different time from the pictures accompany- 
ing them, and the Jewish hymn was sung by a "voice 
double" for Warner Oland. However, let us remember, 
please, that Oland wore several layers of face fungus hiding 



the movements of his lips. Warners', Para- 
mount and other studios are now experiment- 
ing along this line. 

Just when we all thought there was nothing further that 
could embarrass a movie star, comes the talkie with this 
brand-new idea in embarrassing moments. There will be 
all sorts of fun and jollity under the voice-double regime. 
Loo kit: 

Gus Doakes, who has an impressive basso frojundo, will 
be signed on a five-year, guaranteed unbreakable con- 
tract to speak the lines for Emil Jannings. But Samous- 
Warnwyn-Piffany, who are badly in need of someone to 
talk English for their new importation from the Bronx, 
will come under cover of night to Gus and offer him twice 
as much money to desert. Will Gus accept? Well, will a 
swim duck? 

VOCAL HI-JACKING 

EMIL and his employers can sue all they like, but it 
will be months before there's the remotest chance of 
getting Gus back. Meanwhile, it's checkmate for poor 
Emil, who has been galvanizing the entire world with his 
beautiful voice and accent, which were really Gus's. To 
put it tersely, Emil will be left speechless. All the studio 
magicians in the world won't be able to create another 
basso exactly as profundo as Gus's. Emil will have to get a 
new voice, and it will sound like Marilyn Miller using 
Ethel Barrymore's vocal chords. 

Even if we admit (and by all means let's be generous 
about it) that there might be a chance of putting a voice 
under ironclad contract not to desert to another better- 
paying face, nobody can contract a voice not to get 
asthma, colds in the head, bronchitis and similar afflictions. 
In fact, if I were a voice double — and I admit it looks a 
soft proposition for someone of my build — I would make a 
point of having asthma just as soon as one or two of my 
talkies were released. I would {Continued on page 105) 



45 




Colleen as ^htadame 
as Cherry- 

Dainty in stature, quaint little figure 
Seems to have stepped down 
Straight from a screen — 

— From Madame Butterfly 

Specially posed for Motion 



46 







Moore-iental 

^Butterfly Is as Fresh 
Blossoms 

Let not my beauty's lingering bloom 
Be faded quite! Farewell, beloved. 
All is dead for me. All is finished! 

— From Madame Butterfly 

Picture by First National Pictures 

Freulich Photos 



47 




IJressed 



to 



%" 



Anybody aimin' to be orn- 
ery had best not encounter 
Mary Brian, Else he's likely 
to find his peace of mind ab- 
breviated as abruptly as 
Mary's blouse. Not that 
she-'d use her six-shooter. 
Why should she, with the 
double-barreled beauty of her 
eyes all set to slay? 



Richtse 



48 



I 



cJ\jijinska 
Dances Alone 



Once an Intimate of Empresses, 

She is in Hollywood a zJftCagnifi- 

cent ZSfonentity 

By HERBERT CRUIKSHANK 



THOUGH all the roads that lead to 
Rome be dull as the dust of Caesar's 
long dead legions, the sombre world 
still holds a road to romance. It 
circles round and round our sorry sphere like 
a silver ribbon on a ball of clay. And those 
who follow it find — Hollywood. Amazing 
Hollywood! To the shadows of its cloud- 
kissed hills, to the sands of its summer seas 
come wanderers from far places, adventurers 
of the rainbow trail. 

Hidden unsuspected in its towers of alchemy, 
where modern wizardry turns celluloid to gold, lie 
hearts in which are locked a second thousand tales 
for fair Scheherazade. A torrent of words in many 
tongues falls at the feet of any genie with the key. And 
the stories tell themselves. 

On a movie set where a sudden star was shining for her 
little hour, a slight figure stood apart from the flotsam of 
atmosphere drawn from the nation's sculleries. Despite 
the weary droop of her shoulders, she was graceful as a 
slender tree, bowing, but never breaking, before the rough 
caresses of a fateful storm. Her face was beautiful. Not 
with the broad, robust vigor of some farm-spawned milk- 
maid, but with the cameo pallor of the aristocrat. The 
sensitive, imperious mouth, the trembling nostrils, the line 
of the throat, the eyes. Ah, the eyes. Pale blue, sad as an 
ocean of tears. And veiled by lashes which drooped as 
though to hide the tragedy of 
memories. 

Perhaps, as she stood there watch- 
ing the mugging of the movie queen 
among the tawdry trappings of the 
scene, she thought of other queens 
whose pearls were real as their 
royalty — Alexandra of England; 
Victoria of Spain. Of days when 
the Castilian King and the Emperor 
of India and old Franz Josef, last 
of the Hapsburgs, were but few 
among many, who were proud to 
bend their noble knees in homage 
to her art. 

For this was Nijinska ! 
You smile politely, or you shrug 
your shoulders. What, don't you 
remember? 

Surely you cannot forget the 
shower of roses and jewels which 
greeted her at the Metropolitan and 
for twenty tumultuous minutes 




Manuel Freres 




heaped the stage! How the flower of France tossed its 
wealth in her lap at the Theatre des Champs Elysees! 
How the torpid blood of Britain thrilled at Covent Garden 
and Drury Lane! How all Vienna came to adore her at 
the Hofoper — how madly the dons cheered in Madrid's 
Theatre Royal — the crowds at the Colon in Buenos Aires — 
how Rome applauded until the Con- 
stanza trembled! 

And this was only yesterday. But 
now Romola Nijinska, danseuse of 
the Ballet Russe, wife of Vaslav 
Nijinsky, ward of the Czar and 
greatest dancer in all the universe, 
stood on a movie set in Hollywood 
playing a minor part in a picture 
featuring an upstart from nowhere. 
She was born in that cradle of 
genius, Budapest. Her family was 
of the Hungarian noblesse. Her 
father a connoisseur of art, Director 
of the Royal Gallery of Beaux Arts; 
her mother, Hungary's finest dra- 
matic actress; (Continued on page 88) 



At the left, Nijinsky, as he danced in 
"The Afternoon of a Faun. "The brilliance 
of that bright day is pale now. But one, yet 
forever steadfast.vray still shines : the devo- 
tion of his wife, Nijinska, pictured above 



49 



The 




<Di 




Samuel Qoldwyn Qhooses Women 
Trained to Please ?J&en 

BYGLADYSHALL 




EDITOR'S NOTE: — Edna Ferber once wrote a story about a great 
theatrical manager who sent his protege and assistant abroad to find a 
new star. The boy cabled back from Budapest and brought the great 
man to watch a girl carrying mortar up the scaffolding of a new building 
there. They transplanted her to Broadway and she took it by storm. 

How did they know? What did they look for? What did they see in 
her that was not in thousands of other girls? What is the quality that 
makes a star? 

To answering these questions, a series of articles is to be devoted. This 
is the first one. It tells what can be told by the man who found Thomas 
Meighan, Mae Murray, Vilma Banky, Ronald Colman, Lili Damita 
and Walter Byron. His name is Samuel Goldwyn. Whether you're 
wondering how some people become stars, or whether you're wondering 
how you yourself may become one, you'll find what Mr. Goldwyn re- 
lates to be well worth reading. 

IN Hollywood where producers knead film like 
bread, run out features like the parts of a Ford 
car, spend millions in rehashing the same old plot 
or buy classics and best sellers only to distort 
them beyond recognition, manufacture stars out of 
tin and tinsel overnight — in this mart of callow commerce 
one man stands forth an artist. This man is Sam 
Goldwyn. 

It is only necessary to remind you of "The 
Dark Angel" and of "Stella Dallas" to point 
my premise. 

It is only necessary to call to your minds 
those figures of beating blood and moon-magic, 
those darkly thrilling figures of defeat and de- 
sire, Vilma Banky and Ronald Colman, to drive 
the premise home — to stay. 

Sam Goldwyn works like an artizan and like 
an artist. An unbeatable combination. 

His finest, surest instinct lies, first, in 
spotting star stuff, and second, in perfect- 
ing the material he selects. 

He seldom uses raw stock, so to speak. 
Making, as he does, few pictures and 
using, as he does, few stars, these pic- 
tures and these stars must be memor- 
able. They are. Mr. Goldwyn has never 
chosen a second-rater. 

Like a painter of fine portraits, he first selects 
his subject. His unerring eye works for him 
here. Then he makes it his business to know 
his subject. Not only the physical contours but 
the mind and the soul as well. He puts in his 

50 



Lois Moran crossed the 

lens of the Goldwyn 

telescope while she was 

dancing in Paris 



background 

carefully. Not 

everyone can 

do the same 

story, the 

same type of 

work. Not everyone feels the 

same things in the same way. 

Mr. Goldwyn knows this. He next chooses his colors, his 

perspective, his line — and when the work is done you 

have had a Banky and a Colman and you are about to 

have a Lili Damita and a Walter Byron. 

Mr. Goldwyn's star-digging dates back. Back to the 
days of the Laskyian connection when he found Tom 
Meighan and, by Tom's own admission made a few 
weeks ago, "changed the course of my whole life for me." 

TRANSPLANTING TOM 

TOM was playing in London, in stock or 
something. Mr. Goldwyn was also in 
London. He ran into Tom at a 
dinner party given, I think by 





The metal of personality, one stroke of 

Goldwyn genius, and a new star sparkles 

in the cinematic skies 




Edna Goodrich. There was 
a brief encounter of the Meig- 
han and Goldwyn eyes — and 
new star was made. 

Mr. Goldwyn sent Tom to Holly- 
wood. No one else saw in him what 
his discoverer had seen. They weren't 
handling Tom right. They weren't 
bringing him out. A few of the 
Goldwyn touches and — but you all 
know the Meighan career, second to 
almost none. 

It was Mr. Goldwyn, of course, who saw the unforgettable mother in 
Belle Bennett. 

It was Mr. Goldwyn who saw Lois Moran, dancing, in Paris. 

It was he who saw Mae Murray dancing in the Ziegfeld Follies and 
told her she had a cinematic career ahead of her. 

It was also Mr. Goldwyn who went up in a hotel elevator with Fannie 
Ward one day and said to her, "I have something in mind for you." 

It happens just like that. Not through planning or forethought — a 
chance encounter in a restaurant, an elevator, on the streets, a gleam of 
recognition — and a career is made. 

"In Hollywood today," said Mr. Goldwyn, "there is one great bet, 
badly handled, poorly storied, crudely handled, not given the right 
chance — that bet is Joan Crawford. I'd like to have that girl — she has 
everything — Fire. Excitement. Drama. She has everything that 
Pauline Frederick had and everything that Gloria Swanson has. She 
could be made tremendous. It isn't being done." 

We went to the spacious Goldwyn offices on the United Artists lot 
for the specific purpose of asking Mr. Goldwyn why, with all Holly- 
wood, all America to choose from he invariably imports from Europe. 
It seemed that there must be some definite reason. Why, with the gates 
of Hollywood battered in by young, beseeching hands, the girl-market 
glutted, the young sheiks tripping over their own side-burns — why do 
the Vilmas and the Colmans, the Lilis and the Walters come from the 
other side ? 

Mr. Goldwyn assured me that he does not deliberately prospect in 
Europe. It merely happens so. 

"In Hollywood," he says, "what have we? Beauty, yes. The most 
beautiful women in the world are to be found right here in America. But 
beauty is not enough. Beauty is not the thing. It is personality. Brains. 
Feel. Finish. I cannot find it in Hollywood. They are all — hicks." 

To prove his contention, the producer sent for Mr. Mclntyre, his cast- 
ing director. {Continued on page 106) 




Among the many players that Samuel Goldwyn 
has discovered and first made celebrated are — 
beginning at the top, left — Vilma Banky, Thomas 
Meighan, Mae Murray, Walter Byron, Lili 
Damita, and Ronald Colman 



51 



Hellywood 

'People Thin\ That Should 'Be the Town's J^ame 

Before They See It 



BY WALTER RAMSEY 



IF you want to believe the worst about Hollywood, 
don't read this — you'll be surprised! 
Out there in the East and sundry points from 
California you've got the ide# that Hollywood is a 
bad place, awfully bad. That it is the place where 
all young girls go wrong — and all the boys go with 
them. That there aren't any people there who aren't con- 
nected with pictures — and you've heard that picture 
people are wild. Everybody has a Rolls-Royce, at least. 
The name should be changed to "Hellywood." I know 
you think that, because I used to live in a small town in 
the Middle West myself. 

Before I realized my ambition to come to Hollywood, 
I had some very set ideas about what I would find. I 
would find wild women, and plenty of liquor. I knew I 
wouldn't find any law or order — that was out of the ques- 
tion! Everyone would play in pictures — maybe an hour 
a day. They would have lots of money, and big cars. 
But, I came to Hollywood, and we were wrong! Let me 
tell you what they really have. 

Hollywood has policemen — lots of them — too many of 
them, and they're just as big and gruff and Irish as the 
cops in your town. The jail is grey (inside and out). 

Hollywood has churches on almost every corner. I'll 
bet there are more churches in Hollywood, for the size of 
the place, than in any town in the country; and tell your 
neighborhood pastor that the collection plates are 
heaping full — and many of them (he'll probably 
say, "See, that's what they're doing in other 
places"). Every Sunday morning, at a little 
chapel on the Boulevard, I see Conrad Nagel 
in morning coat and white gloves. He has been 
head usher for seven years! In the pews of at 
least twenty churches, every Sunday, a gen- 
erous representation of the movie colony 
kneels and prays. 

CRAWLING WITH LIZZIES 

HOLLYWOOD has Fords— and Chev- 
rolets! You can't believe it — can 
you? Just come out and see! There are 
so many, you'll almost go hay-wire. Of 
course, there are Rolls-Royces, and, I 
might say, every make of car from the 
orchid motah (a la James) to the ordi- 
nary pedestrian obstacles. Yes, I 
might even say, there are some whose 
cars do not choose to run in 1928 or 
any year, until they make more 




dough. We have those who walk — and not from choice. 

Hollywood isn't supposed to have any horses, but you'd 
have a hard time convincing our street cleaners of it 
(some people believe they're just extras playing in the new 
version of "The Four Horsemen"), but I'll promise you 
if they are, they'll be a sweeping success — a natural. 

Hollywood has fourflushers, just as every other place 
has — only more so! To bask in the spotlight of so much 
reflected glory and success has been hard for some. They 
couldn't stand it, so they have established a front. They 
rent expensive cars by the day (once a month). They have 
one complete change of clothing from the best tailor 
or designer. They'll prove it to you, his name is just 
inside the collar — right there, see? They sit in the lobby 
of the Biltmore every noon after lunch — at Childs! They 
are like a mirror with the silver paint worn off — you can 
see through! 

Hollywood has handsome young men (many of them 
are elevator boys); plenty of beautiful girls (working as 
waitresses in cheap restaurants). They came to Holly- 
wood to be Valentinos and Swansons — but, somehow, they 
didn't click. They didn't know the right people, or for 
some reason they never "made it." They tried hard, 
until they were forced to quit theorizing and work if they 
wanted to eat. They found that Hollywood doesn't care 
if a fellow was the best looking boy in Centerville, or if 
all the people have said a girl was so beautiful she just 
must be a movie star. Hollywood is rather cold-blooded 
about looks — they are so easy to find. 

SEE HOLLYWOOD WORST 

I FOUND that the bad publicity and scandal that is 
read in glaring headlines about Hollywood, in my 
little home town and yours, were about one-eighth true. 
When you read" " Hollywood Movie Star Commits Mur- 
der," don't immediately try to imagine Pickford or 
Gilbert or Swanson in the part. It won't be they. 
Nine chances to one, it will actually be some poor, de- 
mented, little extra boy or girl, who has j^S^) 
made $7.50 a day and gone bad. They 
would have gone bad in your town or mine. 
People out of Hollywood seem to want to 
believe the worst about those in Holly- 
wood. I'll have to admit I couldn't find 
out why! 

Hollywood has parties. Oh! you 
know all about them? Well perhaps. 
I've been going to parties in 
Hollywood for five years — ^^^^ 



I 



-"" 






52 




Pretty soft, this screen-acting 
racket! Let 'em drag you around a 
corner a dozen times on a rope, or 
just work about eighteen hours in a 
rain scene, and then nothing to do 
until tomorrow morning at six 



all kinds of parties, cabaret parties, house parties, beach 
parties, picnics — and what have you. They aren't any 
wilder than the parties in New York, Kalamazoo or 
Evansville — they are merely better advertised. Did you 
know that the beautiful movie star — your favorite — 
wouldn't be a star long, if she didn't go to bed at ten 
o'clock when she was working? The movie camera picks 
out defects and shows them. As Johnny Walker says, 
"You can't get up for a seven o'clock call with rubber 
tires hanging under your eyes!" Picture people keep sane 
hours; they can't do otherwise and stay — and that's the 
truth. 

I found out that being in pictures was a hard life! Yes, 
I know you thought all they did was stand in front of 
the camera a few minutes a day — so did I until I saw 
them eighteen hours in one stretch with fire hoses playing 
on them for a rain-efFect; an aeroplane motor and pro- 
peller making a wind-effect; rain and wind and blinding 
kleig lights for eighteen hours. It might be fun for some, 
but you couldn't get me to see it. Do you remember in 
the comedy where you saw them drag a man around the 
corner by a rope? It was on the screen twenty seconds! 
I saw them make that scene. They dragged that man on 
hard pavement around that corner twenty-eight times — 
two and one half hours just to get one effect right. The 
man was almost dead; he got #5.00 for his day's work — 
and life in the movies is called a bed of roses! 

Hollywood has some ordinary human beings! They mow 
the lawn in their shirt sleeves. They go to Westerns. 
They go to circuses. They eat corn beef and cabbage. They 
take a bath on Saturday! They buy bum oil stock. 
They act just like your neighbor, Henry, two doors away. 

MEASLES AND POPCORN GALORE 

HOLLYWOOD has some homely women; some funny 
looking men; the kids have measles; the corner of 
Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue has a pop- 
corn stand with a little old Italian shaking the popper 
over a gas jet; milkmen come around in the early morning; 
the sun shines a lot, and everybody has a good time if 
he can. 



As for the dissipations 
of Hollywood, they re- 
semble those of Eagle 
Rock — in whatever state you wish. The 
sleek sheiks you see strolling along the 
Boulevard are, as likely as not, bound for a high-stool and 
the frothy zest of an ice-cream soda. The night-lifers you 
see out as late as a quarter after ten are headed, in all 
probability, for some hamburger haunt. 

And speaking of night-life, there isn't much of it in 
evidence. And really not much more not in evidence. 
Hollywood and Los Angeles, too, at midnight, look like 
New York at a quarter to five in the morning. The only 
people noticeable are the street cleaners and the cops. 

HOLLYWOOD AFTER MIDNIGHT 

IN regard to that an incident took place once at the end 
of a vaudeville show. Al Herman, the black-faced 
comedian on the bill, espied Ruth Rowland in the audi- 
ence, and asked her if she wouldn't sing a song for the boys 
and girls there gathered together. Miss Rowland de- 
murred, pointing out, in a conversation across the foot- 
lights, that it was the end of the show, and that the audi- 
ence would want to be going. 

"Want to be going?" repeated Herman, "Where would 
they go after eleven o'clock in this town?" 

Which is true — or partly so. So far as small-hour 
amusements are concerned, Herman was right. But he 
wasn't entirely correct in assuming that Hollywood had 
no place at all to go. It did — and does — have a very 
definite destination: bed. And in ninety-nine cases out 
of a hundred, that's where you'll find Hollywood after 
ten-thirty. They don't have a curfew, of course. But the 
reason is that they don't need one. 

Don't you think that the idea that "Hollywood is the 
name of a spot where concentrated wine, women and song 
abound" is a bit far fetched? It's really a great little 
town. A town to live in, laugh in, love in, and struggle 
in. It's a great place to be in — and a nice place to be 
from. 



53 




It was with something of a shock that we learned that this picture of Vilma Banky was from a 
screen story called "The Awakening." We had thought that it must be connected, in some way or 

other, with The Legend of Sheepy Hollow 



54 



A Cynic 
of the Cinema 

William K^Howard 

^Believes in Santa Qlaus 

With c R s eservations 

By DOROTHY MANNERS 



WALLACE SMITH, the writer, once inscribed a 
book of his own which he presented to William 
K. Howard with this inscription : 

To Bill: The Cinderella of the cinema who still 
suspects the Golden Coach is a pumpkin. 

In the vernacular, Mr. Smith said it. Anyway you 
want to put it, Mr. Smith said it. He sized up the 
young Irishman who made "The Thundering 
Herd," "White Gold," "Gigolo" and "His 
Country" more neatly in a phrase or two 
than most people could do in the same 
number of pages. He hit the funny, 
half-ironical, half-sentimental phi- 
losophy of this young-fellow director 
right on the head and nailed it for 
a loop. And left nothing more to 
be said. To continue is super- 
fluous. However — 

Mr. Howard, is by ancestry, 
part Hollywood and wholly 
Hibernian. His hair is black. 
His eyes are blue. He is young 
enough to be a little bitter 
still about the casual events 
of every twenty-four hours both 
on and off the screen. He will 
never be entirely happy in pic- 
tures because he suspects that 
they are a very fine, very splen- 
did, medium of expression. On 
the other hand, he would never be 
happy away from them. He has it in 
him to make delicate, taunting pic- 
tures that would never make a dime 
at the box-office. But when he wants 
to, he can take hold of a meaty thing like 
"The Thundering Herd" and clean up for 
his producers. 



EVERY OTHER ONE FOR HIMSELF 



YOU can't quite catalogue Howard with any con- 
sistent rating at the box-office. He fools 'em. About 
every other production he makes to please the producers. 
The rest of the time he pleases himself and a certain group 
of sophisticated reviewers. Maybe you missed his "White 
Gold." It was in no sense a special, and due to indifferent 
efforts in bookings it was used in many theaters to round 
out a vaudeville program of trained seals and untrained 
sopranos. But there are people who hold that this picture 
was the most worthy contribution to the screen since 




Chaplin's "A Woman of 
Paris." It made not a 
cent of profit for Cecil 
De Mille, who produced 
it, but it increased enor- 
mously the prestige of 
both Jetta Goudal and 
Bill. During the making 
of the picture Miss Gou- 
dal saw nothing in it. The 
French lady and the Irish 
gentleman did not fare any 
too well together. She 
wanted to play the scenes 
with gestures and dramatics. 
He would say "No" in every 
language, including the Scandi- 
navian. They spent a good deal of the 
time in the front office letting Papa De 
Mille smooth out their litcle difficulties. 
When the picture was released and the reviewers gathered 
great bunches of superlatives to lay at its feet, Jetta told 
Bill, "You were right." She told her friends that she had 
had to fight to get it that way. Which may, or may not, 
have added to Mr. Howard's cynicism. 



B 



SALESMAN, SOLDIER, SUCKER 

ILL Howard started out in pictures as a salesman for 
one of the largest and cheapest (Continued on page 90) 



55 



^ is tynfin ite 



Caricatures by 
D. G. Shore 





Until Emil Jannings 
impersonated Louis 
XV of France — above 
— a movie monarch 
was about as realistic 
as the king of dia- 
monds. His perform- 
ance in "Passion" thus 
proved in more than 
one sense to be of 
sovereign worth 



The great German ac- 
tor's fame can hardly 
hang upon a hair. For 
as Pharaoh — above 
— he appeared as bald 
as the Sahara. Yet in 
this guise he achieved 
a characterization 
likely to endure as 
long as the pyramids 



Even the most re- 
strained and grudging 
critics waxed enthu- 
siastic over Jannings 
as Mephistopheles in 
"Faust." They united 
in the pronouncement 
that he was devilish 
good 



56 



"Variety 



,^.»— , 




As the ageing porter in 
"The Last Laugh"— 
above — Emil's 
strength may have 
failed him in lifting 
luggage. But his im- 
personation of him 
lifted his audiences to 
an exalted apprecia- 
tion of his genius 



At home they say that 
the great Jannings is 
just a little boy. Every- 
one, that is, except the 
hobby-horse that has 
to carry him. For 
Emil is a physical as 
well as a histrionic 
heavyweight 



D.GP> 



ore> 



" f.i' / / i ^A\£ P ? 

'I. < U i 'l. < \ ^ £ 




JK lu 




Give those who saw 
Jannings as the Grand 
Duke in "The Last 
Command" free rein 
in Russia and royalty 
would instantly be re- 
established. You 
wouldn't be able to 
find a Bolshevik in a 
droskyload 



57 




Hesser 



For shear sensationalism, no screen star can this year rival Mary Pickford. The amputation of the 
celebrated curls of the most celebrated motion picture actress in the world created unquestionably 

the coiffurore of the season 



58 







Qood-byeto 
Curlhood 



<lM^ss c Pickford Uses 
Scissors to Sign Her 
declaration of Independence 

By DOROTHY CALHOUN 



D 



L OUG says that it's a Scotch bob," 
Mary smiles, "because I wouldn't let 
them take off more." 

It still waves about her face, golden, shining, 
breaking into tiny spirals, still long enough to be 
caught into a roll at the nape of the neck, but the fairy 
story ringlets (the last ringlets in a blase grown-up world) 
are gone! The most famous hair in America has been shorn 
at last, and not since Delilah shingled Samson has there been a 
hair cut of such importance. 

"It came below my waist," says Mary, in the subdued tone of 
one speaking of a departed friend. "It took hours of my life. to 
shampoo it and brush it and arrange it! There were eighteen curls 
when the barber cut them off. He laid them aside carefully in a 
row on the shelf, which wasn't as harrowing as if I'd stepped out of 
the chair into a heap of hair, like Emil Jannings when he had his 
beard cut in 'The Way of All Flesh.'" 

The eighteen golden ringlets, she adds, are in New York now, to be 
mounted so that their bereaved owner may pin them on whenever she 
feels homesick for curls. Ever since the news was announced, letters 
have been pouring in from the fans, letters of protest, grief, even letters 
of rage. Her French maid bursts into tears whenever anyone speaks 
of that lost golden glory, but Mary is almost triumphant. And per- 
haps the least little bit in the world defiant. And probably even a 
little scared. 

DEFERENCE TO HER FANS 

T'VE been wanting to bob my hair for five years," she nods 
A nobody would let me. I went on trying to play the American 
girl with so much hair that I looked top-heavy in short 
skirts, while the real American girls were getting 
wind-blown bobs and boyish bobs and Dutch 
cuts that they could tuck under tight little 
hats. But every time I would suggest bob- 
bing, the fans would write in and beg me 
not to. I had my hair {Continued on page 87) 

The long and short of Mary Pick- 
ford's headdress: at the right, before 
the amputation of her curls; and, 
above, after clipping them 






59 




By Elizabeth 













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i 






i^- _-t' ^^Eb.v 


-<CsmI 








a ■ • j^. " 




J^PB- 




JKfl& 










hHBm>>. • 






^^■MI-JM 



T#£ BATTLE OF THE SEXES 

OALLY O'NEIL has the difficult job of keeping her family 
*3 together in this latest Griffith opus. She has a tough time, 
because her daddy has let his susceptible eye rove in the direction 
of Phyllis Haver, and what can Belle Bennett and the children 
mean to a man who has known Phyllis? Belle, who is easily 
stunned, sits in a daze through most of the picture. But Sally, the 
dynamic member of the family, goes out to bring her dad back at 
the point of a gun if necessary. This is intended to be a poignant 
tale of filial devotion, but somehow it fails to touch the heart 
strings. Sally is splendid. But Jean Hersholt and Belle Bennett, 
while giving good individual performances, seem to be people from 
different spheres of life. They are never convincing as husband 
and wife. Nevertheless, there is plenty to amuse and interest you. 
Especially Sally. 




A WOMAN DISPUTED 

rHIS is the story of the rivalry of two friends, a Russian and an 
Austrian. These boys meet and both fall in love with a little 
Austrian coquette. Then comes the war. And it turns out that 
the Russian did not love her in a very nice way. He captures her 
home town, sentences her and a lot of others to death, and Norma 
in order to save her country and incidentally her own life, is forced 
to make the dreadful sacrifice of worse-than-death. Her true lover 
comes along and for a time there is some misunderstanding, but in 
the end she gets the public recognition that her heroism deserves. 
It is all very dignified. Norma Talmadge dispenses charm and 
affection, and the situation leading up to the sacrifice is very 
cleverly devised. Gilbert Roland acts about as usual, but looks 
more like John Gilbert, owing to his shaved head and his uniform. 
I much preferred the Russian gentleman, so I couldn't feel much 
sympathy for our heroine. 

60 




THE MYSTERIOUS LADY 

GRETA GARBO'S latest picture is devoted to disproving those 
two disagreeable statements of Jim Tully's — that Greta is 
anemic and flat-chested. She darts about displaying unwonted 
vim and vigor, and wears gowns that might very appropriately 
have adorned Barbara La Marr. Greta as a beautiful lady spy 
is too alluring to miss. The action alternates between Austria and 
Russia. A Russian spy falls in love with the man she is sent to spy 
on, and is torn twixt love and duty, in the usual way. This is one 
of those plots that hinges on stealing The Papers, never a very 
absorbing topic. But there is a good deal of suspense. And the 
love scenes are numerous and all that could be desired, even though 
Conrad Nagel is occupying John Gilbert's usual place beside the 
couch. Gustav Von Seyffertitz supplies the menace. Give "The 
Mysterious Lady" a buzz when she shows up. 




A WOMAN OF MOSCOW 

POLA NEGRI starts out very vigorously as a Cossack lady in 
white furs and a dashing sleigh. She dances, flirts, drinks, and 
scandalizes the chaperons in a most promising way. But before 
many reels have passed she has drawn her hair over her forehead in 
two demure locks and is acting as girlish as Sally O'Neil. That's 
what love does to a woman. Pola is a lady from Moscow whose 
Russian fiance is mysteriously killed. She goes to Paris to look 
for the murderer, finds him at the first party she's invited to, and 
falls in love with him. With much anguish she keeps her word and 
arranges to give him up to the police inspector, but at the last 
moment weakens. Then what with one thing and another she feels 
she would be better dead, and obeys that impulse. This is an 
incredibly slow-moving story, and I was quite unable to feel the 
tragedy of it. But I have seldom seen Pola look more beautiful. 
Norman Kerry is the hero. 



s 




FOUR WALLS 

/J DRAMA laid in the underworld, interesting mostly because 
S± of John Gilbert's personality. John is a gang leader, who serves 
a jail sentence and there learns that the. only walls that can im- 
prison a man are the walls of his own soul. The plot concerns his 
struggle, after he is released, to preserve the freedom his spirit has 
found. This is made much harder because his hard-boiled girl 
friend, Joan Crawford, is pulling him in the other direction. Be- 
sides this spiritual theme, there are a gang war and other forms of 
action to entertain you. Vera Gordon, as the mama, does her 
mother stuff well, but she doesn't seem like any kin of Jack's. 
Carmel Myers is unusually good, as a plain spinster with an unre- 
quited passion for Jack. The hero is supposed to be a lad who 
resists one temptation after another. It seemed to me he just said, 
"No! No!" two or three times and then quietly gave in. 




THE CARDBOARD LOVER 

OUR best comedienne in her best comedy. Marion Davies has 
a part which gives her a chance to clown and carry on to her 
heart's content. She is an American schoolgirl, traveling in Paris. 
Of course, she falls in love with a handsome but unresponsive 
young Frenchman, handsomely played by Nils Asther. He loves a 
seductive French lady but feels she is not good for him, so, as he 
can't get rid of Marion, he hires her to get rid of the French lady. 
To this end she disguises herself as his fiancee, as a bell-hop, as a 
bedspread, and other absurd things, and after a long struggle she 
lands her man. The result is a riotous comedy which you are 
advised not to miss. Marion is artless and engaging and mis- 
chievous and all those other things she does so well. Jetta Goudal 
looks quite charming and depraved as the French lady. This is 
ridiculous, but nice. We advise cutting yourself a piece of card- 
board and making yourself a nice time. 



CELEBRITY 

rHIS is really Robert Armstrong's picture. He duplicates the 
characterization that made him famous in " Is Zat So?" — the 
dumb prize-fighter with sex appeal. Clyde Cook is, the manage^ 
who has a few more brains than his pal, and loves Robert as he 
would his idiot child. Inspired by Gene Tunney, the plot has a 
little fun with the idea of a prize-fighter whose books are his best 
friends. Clyde hires a mother, a fiancee, and a ghost writer, fcr 
his moron protege, and lands him on all the front pages as the 
Intellectual Athlete. Everything is going to be all right, when 
someone publishes the poems our hero really wrote, and the humili- 
ation nearly costs him the championship. Clyde Cook is ex- 
cellent, and Robert Armstrong is absolutely perfect. He appeals 
to everyone's maternal instinct or something. It would have 
been a lot better without Lina Basquette as the fiancee. 




THE WATERHOLE 

rHIS is one of my favorite plots — that familiar one about the 
pampered darling of the rich being tamed by a he-man from 
the open spaces. Only in this case, to my great relief, the girl 
simply does not respond to the treatment. You know these spoiled 
heroines usually end by washing the hero's shirt and singing at 
their work. But even Jack Holt can't make this girl give up her 
willful ways. The scene of their little domestic experiment is a cave 
in the desert, and it ends in their struggle to cross the burning 
sands, with parched throats and exhausted limbs. Harrowing, 
entertaining, and charmingly acted by Nancy Carroll, Jack Holt, 
and John Boles. There is a little prelude done in technicolor or 
some equally runny process. A dull episode in the prehistoric ages, 
which contributes nothing to the picture or to Nancy's beauty. 
You had better be a little late. It is our opinion that "The 
Waterhole" is disappointingly, but appropriately a bit wet. 



61 



CWRReNT TIQTUTitJ 




THE BELLAMY TRIAL 

A MURDER story, which takes place in the courtroom where 
SI Leatrice Joy as Sue Ives and Kenneth Thomson as Stephen 
Bellamy are being tried for the murder of Bellamy's wife. The 
testimony of the witnesses, done in flash-backs, reveals the events 
leading up to the crime. This is a distinct novelty for movies, 
but much of it is shamelessly copied from "The Trial of Mary 
Dugan." Things are looking bad for Leatrice and Kenneth when a 
schoolteacher, who says nothing till the last moment just to keep 
everyone on edge, steps forth with evidence that leads to their 
acquittal. Then we have the revelation of who really committed 
the murder, which comes as a complete surprise to everyone who 
hasn't guessed it in the third or fourth reel. There are so many 
different couples and romances involved that it's hard to know 
just whom your interest is supposed to be centered on. Mine 
wandered to Betty Bronson and Eddie Nugent, who play a couple 
of reporters at the trial, and supply all the humor and most of the 
charm. This is novel and interesting and will probably give you 
some thrills. 




THREE RING MARRIAGE 

OTILL another little drama of circus life has for its stars Lloyd 
O Hughes and Mary Astor. Lloyd comes riding out of the West 
and takes a job as sharpshooter in a circus, to prove that he's 
worthy of the girl he left behind him. She gets tired of waiting and 
joins him in a rough-riding act. Meanwhile a hard-boiled bareback 
rider in the person of Alice White has come into his life, and 
Mary's head is being turned by the manager of the show. This is a 
muddled romance and doesn't gain much glamour from its circus 
atmosphere, genuine though it may be. The big punch is furnished 
by the well-known midget, Harry Earles, who hides himself in a 
suitcase. When the villain has Mary locked in his room and is 
just about to bite her, in the last reel, Harry steps out of the bag 
and holds everything until our hero gallops up on his white steed. 
Unless you have some particular craving for Mary Astor or Lloyd 
Hughes, I can't think of any reason for seeing this. Except for 
the acting of the miniature Mr. Earles and the personality of Alice 
White, it has no more freshness or savor than cold roast beef 
warmed up. It's considerably less fun than a circus. 

62 




THE FIRST KISS 

rHIS is the most romantic picture I've seen for many months. 
It was taken on the Maryland shore, and has a lovely lazy 
atmosphere of boats and trees and gently decaying homesteads. 
Furthermore, it is the best part Gary Cooper has ever had, and he 
brings to it an unexpected ability. He seems to have a real feeling 
for the character of the boy who gathers up the last remnants of 
family pride and forces his shiftless brothers back into respecta- 
bility. AH because the girl he loves has called him "poor white 
trash," in a moment of anger. There's something tremendously 
appealing in this lonely desperate figure, who risks his personal 
honor and safety to make his family one he can be proud of. Fay 
Wray is the girl who is the cause of it all, and Lane Chandler and 
Leslie Fenton are two of the brothers. The third brother and the 
drunken father are excellent, too. Maybe this is an improbable 
story, but it's so beautifully done that you'll never notice that. 
And above all, it's romantic. Or am I just getting fatuous? Any- 
way, I know you'll like Cary Cooper. And this in spite of whether 
you have liked him before or not. 




SHOW PEOPLE 

71 yTARION DAVIES gives her impression of how breaking into 
J-VJL the movies is accomplished. But I imagine very few actors 
would recognize her experiences as the real thing. Marion is a 
fluffy belle from Georgia who chugs into Hollywood with her 
daddy — an old Southern Colonel — prepared to sweep the film 
people off their feet. Only one story has ever been written about 
Hollywood, and this is it — the girl who lets fame go to her head, 
and is brought to her senses only after learning a terrible lesson. 
All the lessons in Marion's picture are taught by means of slap- 
stick. Almost everyone gets a custard pie in the face before it is 
over. A lot of good-natured fun is poked at movies and stars, and 
a lot of good chances are allowed to slip by. Marion is clever and 
zestful, but I prefer her when she has to spend less time looking 
like Mae Murray. She does a lightning transformation from Mae 
to Gloria Swanson that is miraculous. You had better see this. 
Dozens of stars wander through the scenes. There are glimpses 
of the inside workings of the studios. And William Haines is the 
leading man, so what more could you want? 



•ja( itgviefr 




JUST MARRIED 

ONE of those boisterous farces in which everyone gets in the 
wrong bed has been made from the famous stage play. It 
takes place on shipboard. The passenger list includes one honey- 
moon couple, one engaged couple, one swarthy vampire who is 
out to get the engaged man, and one intoxicated gentleman who 
has designs on the engaged girl. This combination of the sexes 
could obviously lead to nothing but a double wedding in the 
captain's cabin. But not before many mistakes have been made, 
many embarrassing moments lived through, and the screams of the 
audience have become louder and longer. James Hall, who ulti- 
mately gets the girl, goes through most of the scenes with his 
trousers missing. It's that sort of thing. Ruth Taylor is, of 
course, the blonde ingenue. Lila Lee is the determined vampire. 
Harrison Ford and somebody else whose name I didn't catch are 
the honeymoon couple. And William Austin is, as usual, the goat. 
They all play with the required hilarity. Now you can look into 
your own hearts and decide whether you're likely to be amused 
by this or not. If not, you'll be a lonely minority. 







THE PERFECT CRIME 

7\/fR- BENSON, a great detective, is bored with crime because 
■L VM. all criminals are such bunglers. He retires from the police 
department, and muses in his library on a possible perfect crime. 
The next step is to commit this crime himself, which he does, 
neatly, expertly, leaving no possible clues. Imagine his embarrass- 
ment when another man is convicted for his crime. This is a well- 
made and smoothly acted picture. Clive Brook is the only man I 
know of who could play this cold-blooded murderer and yet 
capture your sympathy as completely as he does. I had an uneasy 
feeling that one or two points needed explaining, but it is a shame 
to approach such a very good picture with too critical an eye. 
The denouement is bound up with the detective's own romance 
and that of the man on whom the guilt has fallen. Irene Rich, 
Carroll Nye, Gladys McConnell, and Tully